Search results for 'Grantham Couch' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. James J. Hoffman, Grantham Couch & Bruce T. Lamont (1998). The Effect of Firm Profit Versus Personal Economic Well Being on the Level of Ethical Responses Given by Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (3):239-244.score: 240.0
    Members of organizations are continually making decisions that have important consequences for themselves and the firms for which they work. In some cases these decisions affect human well being and social welfare and thus have important ethical impacts for those affected by the decisions.This study examines if certain strategic situations (enhancement of firm profits versus personal economic well being) cause decision makers to act more or less ethically. A questionnaire consisting of two vignettes which depicted actual business situations was used (...)
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  2. Mark Couch (2009). Functional Explanation in Context. Philosophy of Science 76 (2):253-269.score: 60.0
    The claim that a functional kind is multiply realized is typically motivated by appeal to intuitive examples. We are seldom told explicitly what the relevant structures are, and people have often preferred to rely on general intuitions in these cases. This article deals with the problem by explaining how to understand the proper relation between structural kinds and the functions they realize. I will suggest that the structural kinds that realize a function can be properly identified by attending to the (...)
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  3. Mark B. Couch (2011). Mechanisms and Constitutive Relevance. Synthese 183 (3):375-388.score: 30.0
    This paper will examine the nature of mechanisms and the distinction between the relevant and irrelevant parts involved in a mechanism’s operation. I first consider Craver’s account of this distinction in his book on the nature of mechanisms, and explain some problems. I then offer a novel account of the distinction that appeals to some resources from Mackie’s theory of causation. I end by explaining how this account enables us to better understand what mechanisms are and their various features.
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  4. Mark B. Couch (2009). Multiple Realization in Comparative Perspective. Biology and Philosophy 24 (4):505-519.score: 30.0
    Arguments for multiple realization depend on the idea that the same kind of function is realized by different kinds of structures. It is important to such arguments that we know the kinds used in the arguments have been individuated properly. In the philosophical literature, though, claims about how to individuate kinds are frequently decided on intuitive grounds. This paper criticizes this way of approaching kinds by considering how practicing researchers think about the matter. I will consider several examples in which (...)
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  5. Todd A. Grantham (2000). Evolutionary Epistemology, Social Epistemology, and the Demic Structure of Science. Biology and Philosophy 15 (3):443-463.score: 30.0
    One of the principal difficulties in assessing Science as aProcess (Hull 1988) is determining the relationship between the various elements of Hull's theory. In particular, it is hard to understand precisely how conceptual selection is related to Hull's account of the social dynamics of science. This essay aims to clarify the relation between these aspects of his theory by examining his discussion of the``demic structure'' of science. I conclude that the social account cando significant explanatory work independently of the selectionistaccount. (...)
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  6. Shaun Nichols & Todd A. Grantham (2000). Adaptive Complexity and Phenomenal Consciousness. Philosophy of Science 67 (4):648-670.score: 30.0
    Arguments about the evolutionary function of phenomenal consciousness are beset by the problem of epiphenomenalism. For if it is not clear whether phenomenal consciousness has a causal role, then it is difficult to begin an argument for the evolutionary role of phenomenal consciousness. We argue that complexity arguments offer a way around this problem. According to evolutionary biology, the structural complexity of a given organ can provide evidence that the organ is an adaptation, even if nothing is known about the (...)
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  7. Mark B. Couch (2004). Discussion: A Defense of Bechtel and Mundale. Philosophy of Science 71 (2):198-204.score: 30.0
    Kim claims that Bechtel and Mundale's case against multiple realization depends on the wrong kind of evidence. The latter argue that neuroscientific practice shows neural states across individuals and species are type identical. Kim replies that the evidence they cite to support this is irrelevant. I defend Bechtel and Mundale by showing why the evidence they cite is relevant and shows multiple realization does not occur.
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  8. Todd A. Grantham (2004). Conceptualizing the (Dis)Unity of Science. Philosophy of Science 71 (2):133-155.score: 30.0
    This paper argues that conceptualizing unity as "interconnection" (rather than reduction) provides a more fruitful and versatile framework for the philosophical study of scientific unification. Building on the work of Darden and Maull, Kitcher, and Kincaid, I treat unity as a relationship between fields: two fields become more integrated as the number and/or significance of interfield connections grow. Even when reduction fails, two theories or fields can be unified (integrated) in significant ways. I highlight two largely independent dimensions of unification. (...)
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  9. Mark B. Couch (2005). Functional Properties and Convergence in Biology. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):1041-1051.score: 30.0
    Evolutionary convergence is often appealed to in support of claims about multiple realization. The idea is that convergence shows that the same function can be realized by different kinds of structures. I argue here that the nature of convergence is more complicated than it might appear at first look. Broad claims about convergence are made by biologists during general discussions of the mechanisms of evolution. In their specialized work, though, biologists are often more limited in the claims they make. I (...)
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  10. Todd A. Grantham (2004). Constraints and Spandrels in Gould's Structure of Evolutionary Theory. Biology and Philosophy 19 (1):29-43.score: 30.0
    Gould's Structure ofEvolutionary Theory argues that Darwinism hasundergone significant revision. Although Gouldsucceeds in showing that hierarchicalapproaches have expanded Darwinism, hiscritique of adaptationism is less successful. Gould claims that the ubiquity of developmentalconstraints and spandrels has forced biologiststo soften their commitment to adaptationism. Iargue that Gould overstates his conclusion; hisprincipal claims are compatible with at leastsome versions of adaptationism. Despite thisweakness, Gould's discussion of adaptationism –particularly his discussions of the exaptivepool and cross-level spandrels – shouldprovoke new work in evolutionary theory and (...)
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  11. Todd Grantham (2009). Philosophy of Biology • by Brian Garvey. Analysis 69 (1):197-199.score: 30.0
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  12. Todd Grantham (1994). Does Science Have a “Global Goal?”: A Critique of Hull's View of Conceptual Progress. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):85-97.score: 30.0
    Hull's recent work in evolutionary epistemology is marred by a deep tension. While he maintains that conceptual and biological evolution are both driven by selection processes, he also claims that only the former is globally progressive. In this paper I formulate this tension and present four possible responses (including Hull's). I argue that Hull's position rests on the assumption that there is a goal which is sufficiently general to describe most scientific activity yet precise enough to guide research. Working from (...)
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  13. Todd A. Grantham (1999). Explanatory Pluralism in Paleobiology. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):236.score: 30.0
    This paper is a defense of "explanatory pluralism" (i.e., the view that some events can be correctly explained in two distinct ways). To defend pluralism, I identify two distinct (but compatible) styles of explanation in paleobiology. The first approach ("actual sequence explanation") traces out the particular forces that affect each species. The second approach treats the trend as "passive" or "random" diffusion away from a boundary in morphological space. I argue that while these strategies are distinct, some trends are correctly (...)
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  14. Todd A. Grantham (2001). K. Sterelny and P. E. Griffiths Sex and Death: An Introduction to Philosophy of Biology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):175-179.score: 30.0
  15. Todd Grantham (2004). The Role of Fossils in Phylogeny Reconstruction: Why is It so Difficult to Integrate Paleobiological and Neontological Evolutionary Biology? [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 19 (5):687-720.score: 30.0
    Why has it been so difficult to integrate paleontology and mainstream evolutionary biology? Two common answers are: (1) the two fields have fundamentally different aims, and (2) the tensions arise out of disciplinary squabbles for funding and prestige. This paper examines the role of fossil data in phylogeny reconstruction in order to assess these two explanations. I argue that while cladistics has provided a framework within which to integrate fossil character data, the stratigraphic (temporal) component of fossil data has been (...)
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  16. Todd A. Grantham & Shaun Nichols (1999). Evolutionary Psychology: Ultimate Explanations and Panglossian Predictions. In Valerie Gray Hardcastle (ed.), Where Biology Meets Psychology. MIT Press. 47--66.score: 30.0
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  17. Todd A. Grantham (1999). Philosophical Perspectives on the Mass Extinction Debates? Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):143-150.score: 30.0
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  18. Robert B. Couch & Joseph M. Spencer (2013). Economy Suspended: The Possibilities of a Badiouian Business Ethics. Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (4):404-416.score: 30.0
    In the philosophy of Alain Badiou, ethics can only arise in relation to an evental truth procedure that breaks from the economic logic of a situation. Further, because for Badiou there cannot be economic truths per se – rather, economic matters must be understood in their relation to one or more truths in the domain of love, art, science or politics – a Badiouian business ethics would look entirely distinct from any ethics that simply places limits on certain kinds of (...)
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  19. James Couch (2008). Understanding the Worldly and Human Significance of At Through Arendt and Gadamer. Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (1):133-140.score: 30.0
  20. Mark B. Couch (2011). Causal Role Theories of Functional Explanation. In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  21. R. Dunbar, J. Barman, A. Einstein, S. Empiricus, C. Fehr, S. J. Gould, T. Grantham, M. Grene, P. Griffiths & A. Guignard (2002). Fernald, RD 9, 16. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins. 247.score: 30.0
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  22. Todd A. Grantham (1993). Beyond “Individuality” and “Pluralism”: A Review of Ereshefsky'sunits of Evolution: Essays on the Nature of Species. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 8 (4):457-468.score: 30.0
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  23. R. Grantham (1996). Doctrinal Bases for the Recognition of Proprietary Rights. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 16 (4):561-586.score: 30.0
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  24. Russ Couch (2005). Cultural Crisis and the Role of the Artist. Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (1):111-118.score: 30.0
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  25. Todd A. Grantham (1994). Putting the Cart Back Behind the Horse: Group Selection Does Not Require That Groups Be “Organisms”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):622.score: 30.0
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  26. Peter Grantham (1981). Ethical Issues and the Family Doctor. Bioethics Quarterly 3 (3-4):180-189.score: 30.0
    Issues recognized as having ethical or moral components are becoming increasingly common, for society in general, the health care system and for general practitioner/family physicians in particular. Some of the peculiar problems for GP's relate to the provision of continuing, comprehensive, primary medical care to large numbers of individuals who provide extensive potential for conflict between all the involved elements: patients, physicians, families, consultants and societal attitudes. There is a need for more formal education programs.
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  27. John N. Thompson, O. J. Reichman, Peter J. Morin, Gary A. Polis, Mary E. Power, Robert W. Sterner, Carol A. Couch, Laura Gough, Robert Holt, David U. Hooper, Felicia Keesing, Charles R. Lovell, Bruce T. Milne And Manuel C. Molles, David W. Roberts & Sharon Y. Strauss (2001). Frontiers of Ecology. BioScience 51 (1):15.score: 30.0
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  28. John N. Thompson, O. J. Reichman, Peter J. Morin, Gary A. Polis, Mary E. Power, Robert W. Sterner, Carol A. Couch, Laura Gough, Robert Holt & David U. Hooper (2001). Frontiers of Ecology As Ecological Research Enters a New Era of Collaboration, Integration, and Technological Sophistication, Four Frontiers Seem Paramount for Understanding How Biological and Physical Processes Interact Over Multiple Spatial and Temporal Scales to Shape the Earth's Biodiversity. BioScience 51 (1):15-24.score: 30.0
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  29. A. Beckerman, M. Doerfler, E. Couch & J. Lowenstein (1997). Ethical Issues and Relationships Between House Staff and Attending Physicians: A Case Study. Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (1):34.score: 30.0
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  30. Richard V. Burkhauser & Kenneth A. Couch (2009). Intragenerational Inequality and Intertemporal Mobility. In Wiemer Salverda, Brian Nolan & Timothy M. Smeeding (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality. Oup Oxford.score: 30.0
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  31. Richard Grantham (1996). An Alert For Authors and Readers of Translated Books. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 39 (2):281-286.score: 30.0
     
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  32. Todd Grantham (2001). Do Operant Behaviors Replicate? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):538-539.score: 30.0
    Operant conditioning is not a selection process. According to Hull et al., selection processes require entities that reproduce to form lineages. However, since operant behaviors do not reproduce, operant conditioning is not a selection process.
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  33. R. Grantham (1993). Reflections After the Lyon Colloquium on Geotherapy and the Rio Earth Summit on Environment and Development. Global Bioethics 6 (1):75-84.score: 30.0
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  34. Todd Grantham (2006). Rethinking the Gene. BioScience 56 (3):267-269.score: 30.0
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  35. Andrew T. Knight, Robert J. Smith, Richard M. Cowling, Philip G. Desmet, Daniel P. Faith, Simon Ferrier, Caroline M. Gelderblom, Hedley Grantham, Amanda T. Lombard & Kristal Maze (2007). Improving the Key Biodiversity Areas Approach for Effective Conservation Planning. BioScience 57 (3):256-261.score: 30.0
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  36. William K. Michener, Elizabeth R. Blood, Jayne Brim Box, Carol A. Couch, Stephen W. Golladay, Daniel J. Hippe, Robert J. Mitchell & Brian J. Palik (1998). Tropical Storm Flooding of a Coastal Plain Landscape Extensive Floodplains Ameliorated Potential Adverse Effects on Water Quality, Fishes, and Molluskan Communities. BioScience 48 (9):696-705.score: 30.0
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  37. A. J. B. W., Herbert Newell Couch & Hans Mobius (1930). The Treasuries of the Greeks and RomansDie Ornamente der Griechischen Grabstelen Klassischer Und Nachklassischer Zeit. Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:154.score: 30.0
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  38. Thomas R. Flynn (2006). Sartre on the Couch. Sartre Studies International 12 (2):92-100.score: 18.0
    Despite Sartre's almost proverbial rejection of Freudian psychoanalysis, Jean-Pierre Boulé places the philosopher himself on the couch in a wonderfully detailed and suggestive work. He notes that the fruit of his study may well be "to help us gain a better understanding of Sartre as an embodied sexual being and possibly demonstrate a new way of connecting biography with oeuvre." After analyzing Boulé's argument and considering the psychoanalytic method itself, I address this last claim about relating Sartre's biography and (...)
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  39. Charles Spezzano & Gerald J. Gargiulo (eds.) (1997). Soul on the Couch: Spirituality, Religion, and Morality in Contemporary Psychoanalysis. Analytic Press.score: 18.0
    Soul on the Couch is premised on the belief that discourse about the soul and discourse from the couch can inform, and not simply ignore, one another.
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  40. Elaine Hoffman Baruch (1996). She Speaks/He Listens: Women on the French Analyst's Couch. Routledge.score: 15.0
    Although much attention has been given to Jacques Lacan in his rereading of Freud and to French women analysts in their deconstruction of traditional psychoanalysis, little has been available in the US on contemporary male French analysts and their treatment of women. She Speaks/He Listens illustrates the range of thought among some well-known French male psychoanalysts today--from Lacanians to anti-Lacanians to eclectics--with regard to women and sexual difference. Through the interview format, with its possibilities for surprise and spontaneity, the book (...)
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  41. B. C. Douglas (2008). Dickens' Characters on the Couch: An Example of Teaching Psychiatry Using Literature. Medical Humanities 34 (2):64-69.score: 15.0
    The value of literature in medical education is widely accepted by medical teachers. There are examples of psychopathology in the characters of novels that provide illustrations of particular psychiatric diagnoses. Characters created by Charles Dickens, often eccentric, have been deemed to suffer from mental disorders. This may be because Dickens could draw on his extensive contact with Victorian psychiatry and interest in psychopathology to create authentic characters. He is widely acknowledged to have described many other medical conditions in his fiction (...)
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  42. Mladen Dolar (2008). Lord and Bondsman on the Couch. American Journal of Semiotics 9 (2/3):69-90.score: 15.0
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  43. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1996). Secrets of the Couch and the Grave: The Anne Sexton Case. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (02):189-.score: 15.0
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  44. Aikaterini Fotopoulou, Donald Pfaff & Martin A. Conway (eds.) (2012). From the Couch to the Lab: Trends in Psychodynamic Neuroscience. Oup Oxford.score: 15.0
    Can the psychodynamics of the mind be correlated with neurodynamic processes in the brain? The book revisits a question that scientists and psychoanalysts have been asking for more than a century. It brings together experts from Psychology, Psychoanalysis, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Psychiatry and Neurology to consider this question.
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  45. Christine Leuenberger (2000). The Berlin Wall on the Therapist's Couch. Human Studies 23 (2):99-121.score: 15.0
    This paper falls under the rubric of the sociology of knowledge, which bridges the gap between phenomenological philosophy and the human sciences (Berger et al., 1969). It presents an empirical investigation of the communicative construction of psychotherapeutic reality. I examine therapeutic talk and psychotherapists' reconstructions of the transition from state socialism in Germany in 1989. In both instances I show how psychotherapists' commonly shared interpretative conventions and rules of reasoning produce typical accounts. The first part of the paper shows how (...)
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  46. Joseph Bien (2008). Couch on Art in Arendt and Gadamer. Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (2):17-20.score: 15.0
  47. M. T. Griffin (1980). Seneca on the Couch Marc Rozelaar: Seneca. Eine Gesamtdarstellung. Pp. X + 663. Amsterdam: Hakkert, 1976. 178 Sw. Frs. The Classical Review 30 (01):28-31.score: 15.0
  48. Joseph Bien (2005). Couch, Kant, Culture End the Role of the Artist. Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (2):163-165.score: 15.0
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  49. Karin Knorr Cetina (1992). The Couch, the Cathedral, and the Laboratory: On the Relationship Between Experiment and Laboratory in Science'. In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press.score: 15.0
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  50. Catherine Rachel John (1996). Quiller-Couch and G. K. Chesterton. The Chesterton Review 22 (3):349-357.score: 15.0
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