Search results for 'Gravitation' (try it on Scholar)

398 found
Order:
  1.  52
    Steffen Ducheyne (2009). Understanding (in) Newton's Argument for Universal Gravitation. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 40 (2):227 - 258.
    In this essay, I attempt to assess Henk de Regt and Dennis Dieks recent pragmatic and contextual account of scientific understanding on the basis of an important historical case-study: understanding in Newton’s theory of universal gravitation and Huygens’ reception of universal gravitation. It will be shown that de Regt and Dieks’ Criterion for the Intelligibility of a Theory (CIT), which stipulates that the appropriate combination of scientists’ skills and intelligibility-enhancing theoretical virtues is a condition for scientific understanding, is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  2.  59
    Greg Bamford (1996). Popper and His Commentators on the Discovery of Neptune: A Close Shave for the Law of Gravitation? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (2):207-232.
    Knowledge of residual perturbations in Uranus's orbit led to Neptune's discovery in 1846 rather than the refutation of Newton's law of gravitation. Karl Popper asserts that this case is untypical of science and that the law was at least prima facie falsified. I argue that these assertions are the product of a false, a priori methodological position, 'Weak Popperian Falsificationism' (WPF), and that on the evidence the law was not, and was not considered, prima facie false. Many of Popper's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  20
    Steffen Ducheyne (2006). The Argument(s) for Universal Gravitation. Foundations of Science 11 (4):419-447.
    In this paper an analysis of Newton’s argument for universal gravitation is provided. In the past, the complexity of the argument has not been fully appreciated. Recent authors like George E. Smith and William L. Harper have done a far better job. Nevertheless, a thorough account of the argument is still lacking. Both authors seem to stress the importance of only one methodological component. Smith stresses the procedure of approximative deductions backed-up by the laws of motion. Harper stresses “systematic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  5
    Charles Goethe Kuper & Asher Peres (eds.) (1971). Relativity and Gravitation. New York,Gordon and Breach Science Publishers.
  5. Steven Weinberg (1972). Gravitation and Cosmology: Principles and Applications of the General Theory of Relativity. New York,Wiley.
  6. V. A. Fok (1964). The Theory of Space, Time and Gravitation. New York, Macmillan.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  7.  43
    J. M. C. Montanus (2005). Flat Space Gravitation. Foundations of Physics 35 (9):1543-1562.
    A new description of gravitational motion will be proposed. It is part of the proper time formulation of physics as presented on the IARD 2000 conference. According to this formulation the proper time of an object is taken as its fourth coordinate. As a consequence, one obtains a circular space–time diagram where distances are measured with the Euclidean metric. The relativistic factor turns out to be of simple goniometric origin. It further follows that the Lagrangian for gravitational dynamics does not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  25
    Arthur Stanley Eddington (1920/1966). Space, Time, and Gravitation: An Outline of the General Relativity Theory. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.
    The aim of this book is to give an account of Einstein's work without introducing anything very technical in the way of mathematics, physics, or philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  9.  4
    Arthur Stanley Eddington (1959). Space, Time, and Gravitation. New York, Harper.
  10. Peter Gabriel Bergmann (1969). The Riddle of Gravitation. London, J. Murray.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. Tauno Mannila (1973). Planetary Gravitation and History. Distributor, Akateeminen Kirjaksuppa.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  5
    A. R. Marlow (ed.) (1980). Quantum Theory and Gravitation. Academic Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  20
    James Owen Weatherall (forthcoming). Are Newtonian Gravitation and Geometrized Newtonian Gravitation Theoretically Equivalent? Erkenntnis:1-19.
    I argue that a criterion of theoretical equivalence due to Glymour :227–251, 1977) does not capture an important sense in which two theories may be equivalent. I then motivate and state an alternative criterion that does capture the sense of equivalence I have in mind. The principal claim of the paper is that relative to this second criterion, the answer to the question posed in the title is “yes”, at least on one natural understanding of Newtonian gravitation.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  14. Steffen Ducheyne, Testing Universal Gravitation in the Laboratory, or the Significance of Research on the Mean Density of the Earth and Big G, 1798-1898: Changing Pursuits and Long-Term Methodological-Experimental Continuity. [REVIEW]
    This paper seeks to provide a historically well-informed analysis of an important post-Newtonian area of research in experimental physics between 1798 and 1898, namely the determination of the mean density of the earth and, by the end of the nineteenth century, the gravitational constant. Traditionally, research on these matters is seen as a case of ‘puzzle solving.’ In this paper, I show that such focus does not do justice to the evidential significance of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century experimental research on the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  37
    John D. Norton (2007). Einstein, Nordstrom, and the Early Demise of Scalar, Lorentz Covariant Theories of Gravitation. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 250 (3).
    The advent of the special theory of relativity in 1905 brought many problems for the physics community. One, it seemed, would not be a great source of trouble. It was the problem of reconciling Newtonian gravitation theory with the new theory of space and time. Indeed it seemed that Newtonian theory could be rendered compatible with special relativity by any number of small modifications, each of which would be unlikely to lead to any significant deviations from the empirically testable (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  16.  74
    H.-H. V. Borzeszkowski & T. Chrobok (2003). Are There Thermodynamical Degrees of Freedom of Gravitation? Foundations of Physics 33 (3):529-539.
    In discussing fundamentals of general-relativistic irreversible continuum thermodynamics, this theory is shown to be characterized by the feature that no thermodynamical degrees of freedom are ascribed to gravitation. However, accepting that black hole thermodynamics seems to oppose this harmlessness of gravitation one is called on to consider other approaches. Therefore, in brief some gravitational and thermodynamical alternatives are reviewed.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  22
    Fritz Rohrlich (1989). The Logic of Reduction: The Case of Gravitation. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 19 (10):1151-1170.
    The reduction from Einstein's to Newton's gravitation theories (and intermediate steps) is used to exemplify reduction in physical theories. Both dimensionless and dimensional reduction are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are pointed out. It is concluded that neither a completely reductionist nor a completely antireductionist view can be maintained. Only the mathematical structure is strictly reducible. The interpretation (the model, the central concepts) of the superseded theory T′ can at best only partially be derived directly from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  18.  20
    Carl Hoefer (1994). Einstein's Struggle for a Machian Gravitation Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (3):287-335.
    The story of Einstein's struggle to create a general theory of relativity, and his early discontentment with the final form of the theory , is well known in broad outline. Thanks to the work of John Norton and others, much of the fine detail of the story is also now known. One aspect of Einstein's work in this period has, however, been relatively neglected: Einstein's commitment to Mach's ideas on inertia, and the influence this commitment had on Einstein's work (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  19.  45
    A. Nairz (1996). A Class of Metric Theories of Gravitation on Minkowski Spacetime. Foundations of Physics 26 (3):369-389.
    A class of metric theories of gravitation on Minkowski spacetime is considered, which is—provided that certain assumptions (staying close to the original ideas of Einstein) are made—the almost most general one that can be considered. In addition to the Minkowskian metric G a dynamical metric H (called the Einstein metric)is defined by means of a second-rank tensor field S (referred to as gravitational potential).The theory is defined by a Lagrangian ℒ, from which the field equations as well as, e.g., (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  39
    J. Brian Pitts & W. C. Schieve (1999). On the Form of Parametrized Gravitation in Flat Spacetime. Foundations of Physics 29 (12):1977-1985.
    In a framework describing manifestly covariant relativistic evolution using a scalar time τ, consistency demands that τ-dependent fields be used. In recent work by the authors, general features of a classical parametrized theory of gravitation, paralleling general relativity where possible, were outlined. The existence of a preferred “time” coordinate τ changes the theory significantly. In particular, the Hamiltonian constraint for τ is removed From the Euler-Lagrange equations. Instead of the 5-dimensional stress-energy tensor, a tensor comprised of 4-momentum density mid (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  11
    Gavin Kennedy (forthcoming). Adam Smith's Use of the 'Gravitation' Metaphor. Economic Thought.
    Adam Smith, in _Wealth of Nations_, used gravitation as a rhetorical metaphor and not in a formal philosophical sense, as used by Newton, Aristotle or Empedocles. Physical gravitational attraction is predictable, accurate and rule-bound; metaphoric gravity, as in relationships between natural and market prices, are neither strictly rule-based nor predictable. Market exchange relationships between independent people are subject to the vagaries of imperfect rhetorical persuasion.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  16
    James Owen Weatherall (2014). What Is a Singularity in Geometrized Newtonian Gravitation? Philosophy of Science 81 (5):1077-1089.
    I discuss singular space-times in the context of the geometrized formulation of Newtonian gravitation. I argue first that geodesic incompleteness is a natural criterion for when a model of geometrized Newtonian gravitation is singular, and then I show that singularities in this sense arise naturally in classical physics by stating and proving a classical version of the Raychaudhuri-Komar singularity theorem.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  8
    David Andrews (2014). Adam Smith’s Natural Prices, the Gravitation Metaphor, and the Purposes of Nature. Economic Thought:42.
    Adam Smith’s ‘natural price’ has long been interpreted as a ‘normal price’ or ‘centre of gravitation price’ based on the famous gravitation metaphor of the Wealth of Nations I.vii, natural in the sense that it is the price that would … More ›.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  21
    John W. Moffat (1984). Generalized Theory of Gravitation. Foundations of Physics 14 (12):1217-1252.
    The mathematical formulation of the nonsymmetric gravitation theory (NGT) as a geometrical structure is developed in a higher-dimensional space. The reduction of the geometrical scheme to a dynamical theory of gravitation in four-dimensional space-time is investigated and the basic physical laws of the theory are reviewed in detail.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  20
    D. Pandres Jr (1977). Gravitation and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 7 (5-6):421-430.
    We obtain a general relativistic unification of gravitation and electromagnetism by simply(1) restricting the metric so that it admits an orthonormal tetrad representation in which the spacelike vectors are curl-free, and(2) identifying the timelike vector as the potential for an electromagnetic field whose only sources are singularities. It follows that: (A) The energy density is everywhere nonnegative, (B) the space is flat if and only if the electromagnetic field vanishes, (C) the vector potential (through which all curvature enters) admits (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  19
    Donald Greenspan (1974). Discrete Newtonian Gravitation and the Three-Body Problem. Foundations of Physics 4 (2):299-310.
    Newtonian gravitation is studied from a discrete point of view, in that the dynamical equation is an energy-conserving difference equation. Application is made to planetary-type, nondegenerate three-body problems and several computer examples of perturbed orbits are given.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  19
    M. Carmeli & S. Malin (1987). Field Theory onR×S 3 Topology. VI: Gravitation. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 17 (4):407-417.
    We extend to curved space-time the field theory on R×S3 topology in which field equations were obtained for scalar particles, spin one-half particles, the electromagnetic field of magnetic moments, an SU2 gauge theory, and a Schrödinger-type equation, as compared to ordinary field equations that are formulated on a Minkowskian metric. The theory obtained is an angular-momentum representation of gravitation. Gravitational field equations are presented and compared to the Einstein field equations, and the mathematical and physical similarity and differences between (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  17
    G. Zet, C. Pasnicu & M. Agop (1991). Gravitation Theory in the spacetimeR×S 3. Foundations of Physics 21 (4):473-481.
    A geometric formulation of the gravitation theory in the spacetime R × S 3 is given. A linear connection is introduced on the tangent bundle T(R × S 3 ) and then the connection coefficients and the Riemann curvature tensor are calculated. It is shown that their expressions differ from those of Carmeli and Malin [Found. Phys.17, 407 (1987)] by supplementary terms due to the noncommutativity of derivatives used on the spacetime R × S 3 . The Einstein field (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  16
    N. Ben-Amots (2007). Relativistic Exponential Gravitation and Exponential Potential of Electric Charge. Foundations of Physics 37 (4-5):773-787.
    We present theories of gravitation and electric potentials with exponential dependence on the reciprocal distance. In the context of this kind of electric potential we investigate the dynamics of a relativistic electron interacting with a proton.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  31
    Lawrence Sklar (1976). Inertia, Gravitation and Metaphysics. Philosophy of Science 43 (1):1-23.
    Several variant "Newtonian" theories of inertia and gravitation are described, and their scientific usefulness discussed. An examination of these theories is used to throw light on traditional epistemological and metaphysical questions about space and time. Finally these results are examined in the light of the changes induced by the transition from "Newtonian" to general relativistic spacetime.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  9
    A. A. Logunov & M. A. Mestvirishvili (1986). Relativistic Theory of Gravitation. Foundations of Physics 16 (1):1-26.
    In the present paper a relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) is unambiguously constructed on the basis of the special relativity and geometrization principle. In this a gravitational field is treated as the Faraday-Maxwell spin-2 and spin-0 physical field possessing energy and momentum. The source of a gravitational field is the total conserved energy-momentum tensor of matter and of a gravitational field in Minkowski space. In the RTG the conservation laws are strictly filfilled for the energy-momentum and for the angular (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  42
    Scott Tanona (2000). The Anticipation of Necessity: Kant on Kepler's Laws and Universal Gravitation. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):421-443.
    Kant's views on the epistemological status of physical science provide an important example of how a philosophical system can be applied to understand the foundation of scientific theories. Michael Friedman has made considerable progress towards elucidating Kant's philosophy of science; in particular, he has argued that Kant viewed Newton's law of universal gravitation as necessary for the possibility of experiencing what Kant called true motion, which is more than the mere relative motion of appearances but is different from Newton's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  28
    Dennis Dieks (1987). Gravitation as a Universal Force. Synthese 73 (2):381 - 397.
    In his book Philosophie der Raum-Zeit-Lehre (1928) Reichenbach introduced the concept of universal force. Reichenbach's use of this concept was later severely criticized by Grünbaum. In this article it is argued that although Grünbaum's criticism is correct in an important respect, it misses part of Reichenbach's intentions. An attempt is made to clarify and defend Reichenbach's position, and to show that universal force is a useful notion in the physically important case of gravitation.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  7
    Hans-Jürgen Treder (1976). Gravitation and Universal Fermi Coupling in General Relativity. Foundations of Physics 6 (5):527-538.
    The generally covariant Lagrangian densityG = ℛ + 2K ℒmatter of the Hamiltonian principle in general relativity, formulated by Einstein and Hilbert, can be interpreted as a functional of the potentialsg ikand φ of the gravitational and matter fields. In this general relativistic interpretation, the Riemann-Christoffel form Γ kl i = kl i for the coefficients г kl i of the affine connections is postulated a priori. Alternatively, we can interpret the LagrangianG as a functional of φ, gik, and the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  6
    Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen (1983). A Gauge-Covariant Bimetric Theory of Gravitation and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 13 (10):1023-1045.
    The Weyl theory of gravitation and electromagnetism, as modified by Dirac, contains a gauge-covariant scalar β which has no geometric significance. This is a flaw if one is looking for a geometric description of gravitation and electromagnetism. A bimetric formalism is therefore introduced which enables one to replace β by a geometric quantity. The formalism can be simplified by the use of a gauge-invariant physical metric. The resulting theory agrees with the general relativity for phenomena in the solar (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  6
    Thibault Damour (1984). Strong-Field Effects and Time Asymmetry in General Relativity and in Bimetric Gravitation Theory. Foundations of Physics 14 (10):987-995.
    The concepts underlying our present theoretical understanding of the radiative two-condensed-body problem in general relativity and in bimetric gravitation theory are critically reviewed. The relevance of the 1935 Einstein-Rosen “bridge” article is emphasized. The possibility (first suggested by N. Rosen, for the linearized approximation) of extending to gravity the Wheeler-Feynman time-symmetric approach is questioned.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  13
    Jon Pérez Laraudogoitia (2001). Indeterminism, Classical Gravitation and Non-Collision Singularities. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (3):269 – 274.
    Until the present, the Newtonian theory of gravitation has only been studied in any detail through the usual, presupposed ontology of point particles. This paper shows that changing our ontology into one which makes use of continuous bodies (non-point particles) allows us to obtain in a simple way two important results relevant to the theory: (a) The Newtonian theory of gravitation is indeterministic in a way apparently unparalleled when non-point particle models of it are used. (b) In the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  4
    J. P. Kobus (1973). A Strictly Geometric Interpretation of Gravitation in General Relativity. Foundations of Physics 3 (1):45-51.
    A geometric interpretation of gravitation is given using general relativity. The law of gravitation is taken in the formR 44=0, whereR 44is the component of the contracted Riemann-Christoffel (Ricci) tensor representing the curvature of time. The remaining curvature components of the contracted Riemann-Christoffel tensor may or may not vanish. All that is required in addition toR 44=0 is that the Gaussian curvatureR be nowhere infinite. The conditionR 44=0 yields a nonlinear wave equation. One of the static degenerate solutions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  3
    Mark Israelit (1989). A Gauge-Covariant Bimetric Tetrad Theory of Gravitation and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 19 (1):33-55.
    In order to get to a geometrically based theory of gravitation and electromagnetism, a gauge covariant bimetric tetrad space-time is introduced. The Weylian connection vector is derived from the tetrads and it is identified with the electromagnetic potential vector. The formalism is simplified by the use of gauge-invariant quantities. The theory contains a contorsion tensor that is connected with spinning properties of matter. The electromagnetic field may be induced by conventional sources and by spinning matter. In absence of spinning (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  3
    P. F. Browne (1977). Complementary Aspects of Gravitation and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 7 (3-4):165-183.
    A convention with regard to geometry, accepting nonholonomic aether motion and coordinate-dependent units, is always valid as an alternative to Einstein's convention. Choosing flat spacetime, Newtonian gravitation is extended, step by step, until equations closely analogous to those of Einstein's theory are obtained. The first step, demanded by considerations of inertia, is the introduction of a vector potential. Treating the electromagnetic and gravitational fields as real and imaginary components of a complex field (gravitational mass being treated as imaginary charge), (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  2
    W. Drechsler (1992). Quantized Fiber Dynamics for Extended Elementary Objects Involving Gravitation. Foundations of Physics 22 (8):1041-1077.
    The geometro-stochastic quantization of a gauge theory for extended objects based on the (4, 1)-de Sitter group is used for the description of quantized matter in interaction with gravitation. In this context a Hilbert bundle ℋ over curved space-time B is introduced, possessing the standard fiber ℋ $_{\bar \eta }^{(\rho )} $ , being a resolution kernel Hilbert space (with resolution generator $\tilde \eta $ and generalized coherent state basis) carrying a spin-zero phase space representation of G=SO(4, 1) belonging (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Jan Dubnicka (2009). Philosophical and Methodological Problems in Building the Theory of Quantum Gravitation. Filozofia 64 (7):658-668.
    The paper deals with selected philosophical and methodological problems concerning the building of the quantum theory of gravitation, which is expected to unify general relativity and the quantum field theory into a single consistent and comprehensive theory. It outlines the basic ontological characteristics of such a theory, its structure and the limitations set upon it by the general relativity and the quantum field theory. Models of such a theory are described as well.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Jan Dubnicka (2011). The Theory of Quantum Gravitation and the Theory of Relativity. Filozofia 66 (4):325-335.
    The theory of quantum gravitation, which is designed to unite the general relativity with the quantum field theory into one consistent theory, raises several major problems. The paper examines the limitations posed by general relativity on the efforts to create an ontological basis of the quantum theory of gravitation, which the latter ought to accept. It concerns mainly problems arising from relating the new field theory with the gravitational field in the general theory of relativity, the problems of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Jan Dubnicka (2011). The Theory of Quantum Gravitation and Quantum Field Theory. Filozofia 66 (8):755-768.
    The paper sheds light from philosophical and methodological points of view on limitations, imposed on the building of the ontological basis of the theory of quantum gravitation by the quantum field theory: 1. this basis necessarily has to be a constantly fluctuating global dynamic field; 2. the field has to be locally excited and of quantum character, i.e, with local excitations subordinated to the principle of indeterminacy and the principle of canonic relationship between commutativeness and noncommutativeness; 3. sufficient theoretical (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Arthur Komar (1980). Concerning Canonical Quantization or Gravitation Theory. In A. R. Marlow (ed.), Quantum Theory and Gravitation. Academic Press 127.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Richard Westfall (1967). Hooke and the Law of Universal Gravitation: A Reappraisal Af a Reappraisal. British Journal for the History of Science 3 (3):245-261.
    From the very day in 1686 when Edmond Halley placed Book I of the Principia before the Royal Society, Robert Hooke's claim to prior discovery has been associated with the law of universal gravitation. If the seventeenth century rejected Hooke's claim summarily, historians of science have not forgotten it, and a steady stream of articles continues the discussion. In our own day particularly, when some of the glitter has worn off, not from the scientific achievement, but from the character (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  80
    David B. Malament (2012). Topics in the Foundations of General Relativity and Newtonian Gravitation Theory. Chicago.
    1.1 Manifolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Tangent Vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  48. William Harper (2002). Newton's Argument for Universal Gravitation. In I. Bernard Cohen & George E. Smith (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Newton. Cambridge University Press 174--201.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  49.  78
    K. A. Brading & T. A. Ryckman (2008). Hilbert's 'Foundations of Physics': Gravitation and Electromagnetism Within the Axiomatic Method. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (1):102-153.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  50. Ori Belkind (2012). Newton's Scientific Method and the Universal Law of Gravitation. In Andrew Janiak & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Interpreting Newton: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press 138--168.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 398