Search results for 'Great Man' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Naoko Saito (2011). From Meritocracy to Aristocracy: Towards a Just Society for the 'Great Man'. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):95-109.score: 60.0
    In the practice of education and educational reforms today ‘meritocracy’ is a prevalent mode of thinking and discourse. Behind political and economic debates over the just distribution of education benefits, other kinds of philosophical issues, concerning the question of democracy, await to be addressed. As a means of evoking a language more subtle than what is offered by political and economic solutions, I shall discuss Ralph Waldo Emerson's idea of perfectionism, particularly his ideas of the ‘gleam of light’ and ‘genius’, (...)
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  2. Paul Glenn (2001). The Great Health: Spiritual Disease and the Task of the Higher Man. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (2):100-117.score: 48.0
    Nietzsche's harsh attacks on modernity suggest a problem: if the modern age is so diseased, can we overcome it and move on to something higher? Or is the disease too severe? I examine the question by studying Nietzsche's view of spiritual health. Spiritual illness, even in the highest man, is nothing unusual or necessarily debilitating. Even the strongest have been infected since the earliest days of civilization. Indeed, infection with slave morality and bad conscience are requirements for spiritual elevation. And (...)
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  3. Leonid Grinin (2010). The Role of the Individual in History: A Reconsideration. Social Evolution and History 9 (2).score: 45.0
    This article is devoted to the significant at all times and sounding anew in every epoch problem of the role of an individual (also a Hero, Great Man) in history, including such an aspect as the role of an individual in the process of state formation and progress. It is argued that in the age of globalization, when the humankind has found itself at the new developmental turning point, in the epoch when the influence of various individuals could affect (...)
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  4. John P. Ferre (1995). A 'Great Man' Approach: A Book Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):55 – 56.score: 45.0
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  5. John Atkinson (2005). A Less Heroic Alexander I. Worthington: Alexander the Great: Man and God . Pp. Xx + 251, Maps, Ills, Pls. Harlow: Pearson Longman, 2004. Cased, £19.99. ISBN: 0-582-77224-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):589-.score: 45.0
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  6. Robert Stout (1929). A Great Man's Life. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):225 – 228.score: 45.0
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  7. John Atkinson (2005). Review: Alexander the Great: Man and God. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (2):589-591.score: 45.0
     
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  8. G. K. Chesterton (2002). A Great Man and a Myth. The Chesterton Review 28 (1/2):3-6.score: 45.0
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  9. Michael A. Flower (2007). Not Great Man History. Classical World 100 (4):417-423.score: 45.0
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  10. Michael A. Flower (2007). Not Great Man History: Reconceptualizing a Course on Alexander the Great. Classical World 100 (4):417-423.score: 45.0
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  11. B. Gerlach (1998). Who Was the 'Great Man', Who Prepared the Theory of Space of Transcendental Idealism? (Kant, Moses Mendelssohn). Kant-Studien 89 (1):1-34.score: 45.0
  12. J. Hen (1999). The Jester--The Great Man. Dialogue and Universalism 9:94-110.score: 45.0
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  13. Rani Lill Anjum & Stephen Mumford, With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility - On Causation and Responsibility in Spider-Man, and Possibly Moore. Critical Essays on Causation and Responsibility.score: 39.0
    Omissions are sometimes linked to responsibility. A harm can counterfactually depend on an omission to prevent it. If someone had the ability to prevent a harm but didn’t, this could suffice to ground their responsibility for the harm. We present an argument for this based on the WGPCGR-thesis: With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility. -/- We argue, with reference to Moore’s account in Causation and Responsibility (Moore 2009), that moral and legal responsibility is based on the power we (...)
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  14. Wu Wei Wei (2003). The Tenth Man: The Great Joke (Which Made Lazarus Laugh). Sentient Publications.score: 36.0
    An esssential work of this enigmatic sage, draws from the ancient traditions of Buddhism, Taosim, and Advaita Vedanta.
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  15. Conrad Black (2012). Murdoch, Like Napoleon, is a Great Bad Man. The Chesterton Review 38 (1-2):296-298.score: 36.0
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  16. Paul Brazier (2010). English Hypothetical Universalism: John Preston the Softening of Reformed Theology. By Jonathon D. Moore and John Owen: Reformed Catholic, Renaissance Man (Great Theologians Series). By Carl R. Trueman. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (1):140-142.score: 36.0
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  17. John Coates (1996). Joseph Chamberlain: Entrepreneur in Politics, by Peter T. Marsh; Younghusband: The Last Great Imperial Adventurer, by Patrick French; and Rabindranath Tagore: The Myriad-Minded Man, by Krishna Dutta and Andrew Robinson. The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):158-167.score: 36.0
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  18. L. S. F. (1963). Man and His Destiny in the Great Religions. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):798-798.score: 36.0
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  19. Jonathan J. Sanford (ed.) (2012). Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry. John Wiley & Sons, Inc..score: 27.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Part One. The Spectacular Life of Spider-Man? 1. Does Peter Parker Have a Good Life? Neil Mussett 2. What Price Atonement? Peter Parker and the Infinite Debt Taneli Kukkonen "My Name is Peter Parker": Unmasking the Right and the Good Mark D. White Part Two. Responsibility-Man 4. "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility": Spider-Man, Christian Ethics, and the Problem of Evil Adam Barkman 5. Does Great Power Bring Great Responsibility? Spider-Man and (...)
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  20. Peter Singer, The Great Ape Debate.score: 21.0
    In his History of European Morals, published in 1869, the Irish historian and philosopher W.E.H. Lecky wrote: At one time the benevolent affections embrace merely the family, soon the circle expanding includes first a class, then a nation, then a coalition of nations, then all humanity and finally, its influence is felt in the dealings of man with the animal world... The expansion of the moral circle could be about to take a significant step forwards. Francisco Garrido, a bioethicist and (...)
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  21. Thomas Paine (1995/2008). Rights of Man. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    A spirited denunciation of the aristocracy and of hereditary government, The Rights of Man caused outrage in Great Britain with its call for democratic reforms ...
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  22. Elfed Huw Price (2012). Do Brains Think? Comparative Anatomy and the End of the Great Chain of Being in 19th-Century Britain. History of the Human Sciences 25 (3):32-50.score: 21.0
    The nature of the relationship between mind and body is one of the greatest remaining mysteries. As such, the historical origin of the current dominant belief that mind is a function of the brain takes on especial significance. In this article I aim to explore and explain how and why this belief emerged in early 19th-century Britain. Between 1815 and 1819 two brain-based physiologies of mind were the subject of controversy and debate in Britain: the system of phrenology devised by (...)
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  23. Bat-Ami Bar On (1987). Could There Be a Humean Sex-Neutral General Idea of Man? Philosophy Research Archives 13:367-377.score: 21.0
    In this paper I suggest that the Humean male and Humean female of Hume’s Treatise would have different mental lives due to a great extent to what Hume takes to be the socio-culture in place. Specifically, I show that the Humean male would be incapable but the Humean female would be capable of forming a Humean sex-neutral general idea of man. The Humean male’s inability is not innate but the result of the trauma he experiences when discovering sexuality, reproduction (...)
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  24. Thomas Paine (1969/2008). Rights of Man. Harmondsworth, Penguin.score: 21.0
    A spirited denunciation of the aristocracy and of hereditary government, The Rights of Man caused outrage in Great Britain with its call for democratic reforms ...
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  25. Roderick Graham (2004/2006). The Great Infidel: A Life of David Hume. Birlinn.score: 21.0
    This complete life story of David Hume, one of Scotland’s greatest thinkers, follows the Enlightenment from its early roots to its full blossoming in 18th-century Edinburgh. Using original sources, many for the first time, this biography details every aspect of the philosopher’s life—from the lukewarm reception of his now pivotal work, Treatise of Human Nature, to the fame and near excommunication brought about by his famous Essays and History. Also detailed are the stories behind his nickname, “The Great Infidel,” (...)
     
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  26. Tobias Hoffmann (2008). Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas on Magnanimity. In István Pieter Bejczy (ed.), Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages: Commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, 1200 -1500. Brill.score: 21.0
    Certain traits of the magnanimous man of the Nicomachean Ethics seem incompatible with gratitude and humility. Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas are the first commentators of the Latin West who had access to the integral portrayal of magnanimity in the Nicomachean Ethics. Surprisingly, they welcomed the Aristotelian ideal of magnanimity without reservations. The paper summarizes Aristotle’s account of magnanimity, discusses briefly the transformation of this notion in Stoicism and early scholasticism, and analyzes Albert’s and Thomas’s interpretation of Aristotle. (...)
     
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  27. Marvin Charles Katz (1969). Sciences of Man and Social Ethics. Boston, Branden Press.score: 21.0
    Ethical self-management; an introduction to systematic personality psychology, by M. C. Katz.--Four axiological proofs of the infinite value of man, by R. S. Hartman.--Some thoughts regarding the current philosophy of the behavioral sciences, by C. R. Rogers.--Autonomy and community, by D. Lee.--Synergy in the society and in the individual, by A. H. Maslow.--Human nature: its cause and effect; a theoretical framework for understanding human motivation, by M. C. Katz.--Mental health; a generic attitude, by G. W. Allport.--Love feelings in courtship couples; (...)
     
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  28. Adam Michnik & Agnieszka Marczyk (2012). When Socrates Became Pericles Václav Havel's “Great History,” 1936–2011. Common Knowledge 18 (3):387-418.score: 21.0
    This essay is a memorial tribute from one member of the Common Knowledge editorial board to another. Adam Michnik, a cofounder of the first dissident organization in East-Central Europe, writes about the details and the symbolic importance of his first meeting, in 1978 on Mt. Snĕžka, with Václav Havel, coorganizer of Charter 77. From his insider’s perspective, the author retells the history of dissent in communist Europe from that time until the Velvet Revolution and Havel’s election as president of Czechoslovakia (...)
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  29. Daniel N. Robinson (2004). The Great Ideas of Philosophy. Teaching Co..score: 21.0
    From the Upanishads to Homer -- Philosophy, did the Greeks invent it -- Pythagoras and the divinity of number -- What is there? -- The Greek tragedians on man's fate -- Herodotus and the lamp of history -- Socrates on the examined life -- Plato's search for truth -- Can virtue be taught? -- Plato's Republic, man writ large -- Hippocrates and the science of life -- Aristotle on the knowable -- Aristotle on friendship -- Aristotle on the perfect life (...)
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  30. Richard W. Rousseau (1972). Secular and Christian Images of Man. Thought 47 (2):165-200.score: 21.0
    Secular images of man show him as alienated and masterful; Christian images as alienated, masterful, and redeemed. The differences are great but there are similarities as well.
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  31. Marc Bekoff (1997). Deep Ethology, Animal Rights, and the Great Ape/Animal Project: Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):269-296.score: 18.0
    In this essay I argue that the evolutionary and comparative study of nonhuman animal (hereafter animal) cognition in a wide range of taxa by cognitive ethologists can readily inform discussions about animal protection and animal rights. However, while it is clear that there is a link between animal cognitive abilities and animal pain and suffering, I agree with Jeremy Bentham who claimed long ago the real question does not deal with whether individuals can think or reason but rather with whether (...)
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  32. Lorna Green, The Great Philosophers: Where They Missed It and Why.score: 18.0
    The great philosophers missed it, and here are the reasons why, how to bring them all up to date, a woman's take on things, with new categories and concepts, like love, oneness, the feminine, the earth, Spirit, the end of the old order, and the beginning of the new.
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  33. Logi Gunnarsson (2008). The Great Apes and the Severely Disabled: Moral Status and Thick Evaluative Concepts. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (3):305 - 326.score: 18.0
    The literature of bioethics suffers from two serious problems. (1) Most authors are unable to take seriously both the rights of the great apes and of severely disabled human infants. Rationalism—moral status rests on rational capacities—wrongly assigns a higher moral status to the great apes than to all severely disabled human infants with less rational capacities than the great apes. Anthropocentrism—moral status depends on membership in the human species—falsely grants all humans a higher moral status than the (...)
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  34. Gerasimos Santas (2001). Plato's Criticism of the ``Democratic Man'' in the Republic. Journal of Ethics 5 (1):57-71.score: 18.0
    The article discusses two puzzles about Plato''s account of the democratic person: (1) unlike his account of the democratic city, his characterization of a democratic person is markedly incorrect. (2) His criticism of a person so characterized is criticism of a straw man. The article argues that the first puzzle is resolved if we see it as a result of Plato''s assumption that a democratic person is a person whose soul is isomorphic to a democratic constitution. Such a person has (...)
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  35. Huaiyu Wang (2007). On Ge Wu: Recovering the Way of the "Great Learning". Philosophy East and West 57 (2):204 - 226.score: 18.0
    By rethinking the meaning of a central idiom in the Great Learning, this essay intends to open up a new horizon for the hermeneutics of early Confucian thinking, which has little to do with metaphysics. Through a careful etymological study of ge wu and a dialogue between the Great Learning and Heidegger's phenomenology of human affection, I demonstrate the critical position of the human heart in early Chinese thinking. This new interpretation of early Confucian moral teachings also recovers (...)
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  36. Piers J. Hale (2013). Monkeys Into Men and Men Into Monkeys: Chance and Contingency in the Evolution of Man, Mind and Morals in Charles Kingsley's Water Babies. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):551-597.score: 18.0
    The nineteenth century theologian, author and poet Charles Kingsley was a notable populariser of Darwinian evolution. He championed Darwin’s cause and that of honesty in science for more than a decade from 1859 to 1871. Kingsley’s interpretation of evolution shaped his theology, his politics and his views on race. The relationship between men and apes set the context for Kingsley’s consideration of these issues. Having defended Darwin for a decade in 1871 Kingsley was dismayed to read Darwin’s account of the (...)
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  37. Robert T. Pennock (1995). Moral Darwinism: Ethical Evidence for the Descent of Man. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 10 (3):287-307.score: 18.0
    Could an ethical theory ever play a substantial evidential role in a scientific argument for an empirical hypothesis? InThe Descent of Man, Darwin includes an extended discussion of the nature of human morality, and the ethical theory which he sketches is not simply developed as an interesting ramification of his theory of evolution, but is used as a key part of his evidence for human descent from animal ancestors. Darwin must rebut the argument that, because of our moral nature, humans (...)
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  38. Simon Bacon (2013). “We Can Rebuild Him!”: The Essentialisation of the Human/Cyborg Interface in the Twenty-First Century, or Whatever Happened to The Six Million Dollar Man? [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (3):267-276.score: 18.0
    This paper aims to show how recent cinematic representations reveal a far more pessimistic and essentialised vision of Human/Cyborg hybridity in comparison with the more enunciative and optimistic ones seen at the end of the twentieth century. Donna Haraway’s still influential 1985 essay “A Cyborg Manifesto” saw the combination of the organic and the technological as offering new and exciting ways beyond the normalised culturally constructed categories of gender and identity formation. However, more recently critics see her later writings as (...)
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  39. David Egan (2012). Das Man and Distantiality in Being and Time. Inquiry 55 (3):289-306.score: 18.0
    Heidegger's discussion of das Man (often translated as "the 'They'") in Being and Time is notoriously inconsistent, and raises a number of interpretative issues that have been debated in the secondary literature. This paper offers two arguments that aim to make for a consistent and charitable reading of das Man. First, unlike Dasein, das Man's way of being is not existence: das Man lacks Dasein's particularity (it offers only general norms, and cannot address Dasein's unique situation), unity (das Man is (...)
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  40. Brian Ribeiro (2008). How Often Do We (Philosophy Professors) Commit the Straw Man Fallacy? Teaching Philosophy 31 (1):27-38.score: 18.0
    In a recent paper (in Argumentation, 2006) Robert Talisse and Scott Aikin suggest that we ought to recognize two distinct forms of the straw man fallacy. In addition to misrepresenting the strength of an opponent’s specific argument (= the representation form), one can also misrepresent the strength of one’s opposition in general, or the overall state of a debate, by selecting a (relatively) weak opponent for critical consideration (= the selection form). Here I consider whether we as philosophy professors could (...)
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  41. Duane K. Friesen & Bradley D. Guhr (2009). Metanoia and Healing: Toward a Great Plains Land Ethic. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):723-753.score: 18.0
    A Great Plains land ethic is shaped by an intimate knowledge of and appreciation for the evolution, ecology, and aesthetics of the plains landscape. The landscape evokes a sense of wonder and mystery suggested by the word "sacrament." The biblical concept of "covenant" points to God as a community-forming power, a creative process that has evolved into the earth community to which we humans belong. In contrast to an anthropocentric ethic which emphasizes human dominion over nature, a Theo-centric land (...)
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  42. Anna Dziedzic (2011). Stanisław Brzozowski on the Ideal of the Modern Man. Studies in East European Thought 63 (4):345-354.score: 18.0
    Stanisław Brzozowski formulated the ideal of modern man in the polemic with the contemporary man, who has ceased to believe in truth and moral values and is devoid of the will to act. For Brzozowski modernity involves the discovery of truth about the human condition: about man as an autonomous subject, a creator of values, who struggles with non-human reality. This truth was formulated in Kant’s idea of autonomy and in Marx’ idea of a collective conquest of the world of (...)
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  43. Ayon Roy (2009). Hegel Contra Schlegel; Kierkegaard Contra De Man. PMLA 124 (1):107-126.score: 18.0
    At the turn of the nineteenth century, Friedrich Schlegel developed an influential theory of irony that anticipated some of the central concerns of postmodernity. His most vocal contemporary critic, the philosopher Hegel, sought to demonstrate that Schlegel’s theory of irony tacitly relied on certain problematic aspects of Fichte’s philosophy. While Schlegel’s theory of irony has generated seemingly endless commentary in recent critical discourse, Hegel’s critique of Schlegelian irony has gone neglected. This essay’s primary aim is to defend Hegel’s critique of (...)
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  44. Marcel van Marrewijk (2004). The Social Dimension of Organizations: Recent Experiences with Great Place to Work® Assessment Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (2):135-146.score: 18.0
    This paper elaborates on conceptual, empirical and practical arguments why corporations need to focus on their social dimensions, in order to further enhance organizational performance. The paper starts with an introduction on the general trend towards inclusiveness and connectedness. It then elaborates on the phase-wise development of cultures and organizational structures. Managing corporate improvement by building cultures of trust is the central focus of this contribution. By showing the cultural dimensions of Great Places to Work and their workplace practices, (...)
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  45. Marcin Lewiński (2011). Towards a Critique-Friendly Approach to the Straw Man Fallacy Evaluation. Argumentation 25 (4):469-497.score: 18.0
    In this article I address the following question: When are reformulations in argumentative criticisms reasonable and when do they become fallacious straw men? Following ideas developed in the integrated version of pragma-dialectics, I approach argumentation as an element of agonistic exchanges permeated by arguers’ strategic manoeuvring aimed at effectively defeating the opponent with reasonable means. I propose two basic context-sensitive criteria for deciding on the reasonableness of reformulations: precision of the rules for interpretation (precise vs. loose) and general expectation of (...)
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  46. Caterina Francisco Lorenzo-Molo & Zenon Arthur Siloran Udani (2013). Bringing Back the Essence of the “S” and “R” to CSR: Understanding the Limitations of the Merchant Trade and the White Man's Burden. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):123-136.score: 18.0
    One of the fundamental struggles in corporate social responsibility (CSR) is the uncertainty and inherent contradictions that stem from a company being an individual legal entity and a community of persons. The authors contend that CSR has departed from the essence of “social responsibility.” The paper is a commentary on CSR, presented as two frameworks rooted in individualism—The Merchant Trade (the strategic view of CSR) and The White Man’s Burden (self-righteous CSR heroism that assumes the shackles of responsibility normally offered (...)
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  47. Mathias Osvath & Tomas Persson (2013). Great Apes Can Defer Exchange: A Replication with Different Results Suggesting Future Oriented Behavior. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    The topic of cognitive foresight in non-human animals has received considerable attention in the last decade. The main questions concern whether the animals can prepare for upcoming situations which are, to various degrees, contextually or sensorially detached from the situation in which the preparations are made. Studies on great apes have focused on tool-related tasks, e.g. the ability to select a tool which is functional only in the future. Dufour and Sterck (2008), however, investigated whether chimpanzees were also able (...)
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  48. Rodica Albu (2010). C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (15):110-116.score: 18.0
    C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man HarperCollins Publishers, New York, 2001.
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  49. Jennifer Dawson, Judy Sheeshka, Donald C. Cole, David Kraft & Amy Waugh (2008). Fishers Weigh In: Benefits and Risks of Eating Great Lakes Fish From the Consumer's Perspective. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):349-364.score: 18.0
    Three decades of concern over consumption of potentially contaminated Great Lakes fish has led government agencies and public health proponents to implement risk assessment and management programs as a means of protecting the health of fishers and their families. While well-meaning in their intent, these programs––and much of the research conducted to support and evaluate them––were not designed to accommodate the understandings and concerns of the fish consumer. Results from a qualitative component of a multi-disciplinary, multi-year research project on (...)
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  50. Adam Drozdek (1992). Moral Dimension of Man and Artificial Intelligence. AI and Society 6 (3):271-280.score: 18.0
    Steady technological and economic progress gives science and the scientific method a distinguished position in today's culture. Therefore, there may be an impression that areas not belonging to science may hamper this progress of humanity. The views of Dean E. Wooldridge exemplify this position. The only hope is seen in the rational dimension of man in which there is no room for ethical considerations. This rational dimension is also the sole representation of man in the image created by artificial intelligence. (...)
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