Search results for 'Great Man' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Naoko Saito (2011). From Meritocracy to Aristocracy: Towards a Just Society for the 'Great Man'. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):95-109.score: 120.0
    In the practice of education and educational reforms today ‘meritocracy’ is a prevalent mode of thinking and discourse. Behind political and economic debates over the just distribution of education benefits, other kinds of philosophical issues, concerning the question of democracy, await to be addressed. As a means of evoking a language more subtle than what is offered by political and economic solutions, I shall discuss Ralph Waldo Emerson's idea of perfectionism, particularly his ideas of the ‘gleam of light’ and ‘genius’, (...)
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  2. Paul Glenn (2001). The Great Health: Spiritual Disease and the Task of the Higher Man. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (2):100-117.score: 96.0
    Nietzsche's harsh attacks on modernity suggest a problem: if the modern age is so diseased, can we overcome it and move on to something higher? Or is the disease too severe? I examine the question by studying Nietzsche's view of spiritual health. Spiritual illness, even in the highest man, is nothing unusual or necessarily debilitating. Even the strongest have been infected since the earliest days of civilization. Indeed, infection with slave morality and bad conscience are requirements for spiritual elevation. And (...)
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  3. Leonid Grinin (2010). The Role of the Individual in History: A Reconsideration. Social Evolution and History 9 (2).score: 90.0
    This article is devoted to the significant at all times and sounding anew in every epoch problem of the role of an individual (also a Hero, Great Man) in history, including such an aspect as the role of an individual in the process of state formation and progress. It is argued that in the age of globalization, when the humankind has found itself at the new developmental turning point, in the epoch when the influence of various individuals could affect (...)
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  4. John P. Ferre (1995). A 'Great Man' Approach: A Book Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):55 – 56.score: 90.0
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  5. John Atkinson (2005). A Less Heroic Alexander I. Worthington: Alexander the Great: Man and God . Pp. Xx + 251, Maps, Ills, Pls. Harlow: Pearson Longman, 2004. Cased, £19.99. ISBN: 0-582-77224-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):589-.score: 90.0
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  6. G. K. Chesterton (2002). A Great Man and a Myth. The Chesterton Review 28 (1/2):3-6.score: 90.0
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  7. Robert Stout (1929). A Great Man's Life. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):225 – 228.score: 90.0
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  8. John Atkinson (2005). Review: Alexander the Great: Man and God. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (2):589-591.score: 90.0
     
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  9. Michael A. Flower (2007). Not Great Man History. Classical World 100 (4):417-423.score: 90.0
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  10. Michael A. Flower (2007). Not Great Man History: Reconceptualizing a Course on Alexander the Great. Classical World 100 (4):417-423.score: 90.0
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  11. B. Gerlach (1998). Who Was the 'Great Man', Who Prepared the Theory of Space of Transcendental Idealism? (Kant, Moses Mendelssohn). Kant-Studien 89 (1):1-34.score: 90.0
  12. J. Hen (1999). The Jester--The Great Man. Dialogue and Universalism 9:94-110.score: 90.0
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  13. Rani Lill Anjum & Stephen Mumford, With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility - On Causation and Responsibility in Spider-Man, and Possibly Moore. Critical Essays on Causation and Responsibility.score: 78.0
    Omissions are sometimes linked to responsibility. A harm can counterfactually depend on an omission to prevent it. If someone had the ability to prevent a harm but didn’t, this could suffice to ground their responsibility for the harm. We present an argument for this based on the WGPCGR-thesis: With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility. -/- We argue, with reference to Moore’s account in Causation and Responsibility (Moore 2009), that moral and legal responsibility is based on the power we (...)
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  14. Wu Wei Wei (2003). The Tenth Man: The Great Joke (Which Made Lazarus Laugh). Sentient Publications.score: 72.0
    An esssential work of this enigmatic sage, draws from the ancient traditions of Buddhism, Taosim, and Advaita Vedanta.
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  15. John Coates (1996). Joseph Chamberlain: Entrepreneur in Politics, by Peter T. Marsh; Younghusband: The Last Great Imperial Adventurer, by Patrick French; and Rabindranath Tagore: The Myriad-Minded Man, by Krishna Dutta and Andrew Robinson. The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):158-167.score: 72.0
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  16. Paul Brazier (2010). English Hypothetical Universalism: John Preston the Softening of Reformed Theology. By Jonathon D. Moore and John Owen: Reformed Catholic, Renaissance Man (Great Theologians Series). By Carl R. Trueman. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (1):140-142.score: 72.0
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  17. L. S. F. (1963). Man and His Destiny in the Great Religions. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):798-798.score: 72.0
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  18. Conrad Black (2012). Murdoch, Like Napoleon, is a Great Bad Man. The Chesterton Review 38 (1-2):296-298.score: 72.0
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  19. Jonathan J. Sanford (ed.) (2012). Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry. John Wiley & Sons, Inc..score: 54.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Part One. The Spectacular Life of Spider-Man? 1. Does Peter Parker Have a Good Life? Neil Mussett 2. What Price Atonement? Peter Parker and the Infinite Debt Taneli Kukkonen "My Name is Peter Parker": Unmasking the Right and the Good Mark D. White Part Two. Responsibility-Man 4. "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility": Spider-Man, Christian Ethics, and the Problem of Evil Adam Barkman 5. Does Great Power Bring Great Responsibility? Spider-Man and (...)
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  20. Leone Gazziero (2013). Et quoniam est quis tertius homo. Argument, exégèse, contresens dans la littérature latine apparentée aux Sophistici elenchi d’Aristote. Archives D’Histoire Doctrinale Et Littéraire du Moyen Âge 80:7-48.score: 48.0
  21. Peter Singer, The Great Ape Debate.score: 42.0
    In his History of European Morals, published in 1869, the Irish historian and philosopher W.E.H. Lecky wrote: At one time the benevolent affections embrace merely the family, soon the circle expanding includes first a class, then a nation, then a coalition of nations, then all humanity and finally, its influence is felt in the dealings of man with the animal world... The expansion of the moral circle could be about to take a significant step forwards. Francisco Garrido, a bioethicist and (...)
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  22. Thomas Paine (1995/2008). Rights of Man. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    A spirited denunciation of the aristocracy and of hereditary government, The Rights of Man caused outrage in Great Britain with its call for democratic reforms ...
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  23. Elfed Huw Price (2012). Do Brains Think? Comparative Anatomy and the End of the Great Chain of Being in 19th-Century Britain. History of the Human Sciences 25 (3):32-50.score: 42.0
    The nature of the relationship between mind and body is one of the greatest remaining mysteries. As such, the historical origin of the current dominant belief that mind is a function of the brain takes on especial significance. In this article I aim to explore and explain how and why this belief emerged in early 19th-century Britain. Between 1815 and 1819 two brain-based physiologies of mind were the subject of controversy and debate in Britain: the system of phrenology devised by (...)
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  24. Bat-Ami Bar On (1987). Could There Be a Humean Sex-Neutral General Idea of Man? Philosophy Research Archives 13:367-377.score: 42.0
    In this paper I suggest that the Humean male and Humean female of Hume’s Treatise would have different mental lives due to a great extent to what Hume takes to be the socio-culture in place. Specifically, I show that the Humean male would be incapable but the Humean female would be capable of forming a Humean sex-neutral general idea of man. The Humean male’s inability is not innate but the result of the trauma he experiences when discovering sexuality, reproduction (...)
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  25. Thomas Paine (1969/2008). Rights of Man. Harmondsworth, Penguin.score: 42.0
    A spirited denunciation of the aristocracy and of hereditary government, The Rights of Man caused outrage in Great Britain with its call for democratic reforms ...
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  26. Richard W. Rousseau (1972). Secular and Christian Images of Man. Thought 47 (2):165-200.score: 42.0
    Secular images of man show him as alienated and masterful; Christian images as alienated, masterful, and redeemed. The differences are great but there are similarities as well.
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  27. Roderick Graham (2004/2006). The Great Infidel: A Life of David Hume. Birlinn.score: 42.0
    This complete life story of David Hume, one of Scotland’s greatest thinkers, follows the Enlightenment from its early roots to its full blossoming in 18th-century Edinburgh. Using original sources, many for the first time, this biography details every aspect of the philosopher’s life—from the lukewarm reception of his now pivotal work, Treatise of Human Nature, to the fame and near excommunication brought about by his famous Essays and History. Also detailed are the stories behind his nickname, “The Great Infidel,” (...)
     
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  28. Tobias Hoffmann (2008). Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas on Magnanimity. In István Pieter Bejczy (ed.), Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages: Commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, 1200 -1500. Brill.score: 42.0
    Certain traits of the magnanimous man of the Nicomachean Ethics seem incompatible with gratitude and humility. Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas are the first commentators of the Latin West who had access to the integral portrayal of magnanimity in the Nicomachean Ethics. Surprisingly, they welcomed the Aristotelian ideal of magnanimity without reservations. The paper summarizes Aristotle’s account of magnanimity, discusses briefly the transformation of this notion in Stoicism and early scholasticism, and analyzes Albert’s and Thomas’s interpretation of Aristotle. (...)
     
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  29. Marvin Charles Katz (1969). Sciences of Man and Social Ethics. Boston, Branden Press.score: 42.0
    Ethical self-management; an introduction to systematic personality psychology, by M. C. Katz.--Four axiological proofs of the infinite value of man, by R. S. Hartman.--Some thoughts regarding the current philosophy of the behavioral sciences, by C. R. Rogers.--Autonomy and community, by D. Lee.--Synergy in the society and in the individual, by A. H. Maslow.--Human nature: its cause and effect; a theoretical framework for understanding human motivation, by M. C. Katz.--Mental health; a generic attitude, by G. W. Allport.--Love feelings in courtship couples; (...)
     
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  30. Adam Michnik & Agnieszka Marczyk (2012). When Socrates Became Pericles Václav Havel's “Great History,” 1936–2011. Common Knowledge 18 (3):387-418.score: 42.0
    This essay is a memorial tribute from one member of the Common Knowledge editorial board to another. Adam Michnik, a cofounder of the first dissident organization in East-Central Europe, writes about the details and the symbolic importance of his first meeting, in 1978 on Mt. Snĕžka, with Václav Havel, coorganizer of Charter 77. From his insider’s perspective, the author retells the history of dissent in communist Europe from that time until the Velvet Revolution and Havel’s election as president of Czechoslovakia (...)
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  31. Daniel N. Robinson (2004). The Great Ideas of Philosophy. Teaching Co..score: 42.0
    From the Upanishads to Homer -- Philosophy, did the Greeks invent it -- Pythagoras and the divinity of number -- What is there? -- The Greek tragedians on man's fate -- Herodotus and the lamp of history -- Socrates on the examined life -- Plato's search for truth -- Can virtue be taught? -- Plato's Republic, man writ large -- Hippocrates and the science of life -- Aristotle on the knowable -- Aristotle on friendship -- Aristotle on the perfect life (...)
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  32. Elvira Groza (2010). "Scrisorile către un provincial" ale lui Mircea Eliade. Răspunsul unui provincial din viitor/ Mircea Eliade's Letters for a Provincial. The Answer from a Provincial from the Future. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (15):88-93.score: 36.0
    he article analyzes The Letters for a Provincial, addressed by Mircea Eliade to a hypothetical provincial in order to prepare access to the capital city. The letters are written so as to dislocate the provincial from a cultural model built on fake values and prejudices. From a mere pretext, the letters are turned into a symbolic act through which the historian of religions assumes, on the one hand, the destiny of a messenger of a new humanism, and, on the other (...)
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  33. Uskali Mäki (ed.) (2001). The Economic World View: Studies in the Ontology of Economics. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    The beliefs of economists are not solely determined by empirical evidence in direct relation to the theories and models they hold. Economists hold 'ontological presuppositions', fundamental ideas about the nature of being which direct their thinking about economic behaviour. In this volume, leading philosophers and economists examine these hidden presuppositions, searching for a 'world view' of economics. What properties are attributed to human individuals in economic theories, and which are excluded? Does economic man exist? Do markets have an essence? Do (...)
     
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  34. Ernest Lepore & Francis Jeffry Pelletier, Linguistics and Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Roger Gibson has achieved as much as anyone else, indeed, more, in presenting and defending Quine’s philosophy. It is no surprise that the great man W.V. Quine himself said that in reading Gibson he gained a welcome perspective on his own work. His twin books The Philosophy of W.V. Quine and Enlightened Empiricism have no rivals. We are all indebted to Roger. The essay that follows is intended not only to honor him but also to continue a theme that (...)
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  35. Nicholas Joll (ed.) (2012). Philosophy and the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 30.0
    [Adapted from the book's back-cover:] -/- This is the ‘philosophy and. .’ book that really needed to be written – because it is about The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. For (to paraphrase the great man himself) Hitchhiker’s is not above a little philosophy in the same way that the sea is not above the sky. Moreover: this edited collection tries hard to combine accessibility – and some humour – with rigour. The book contains an introduction, nine chapters (all (...)
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  36. James Rachels (1993). Why Darwinians Should Support Equal Treatment for Other Great Apes. In Paolo Cavalieri Peter Singer (ed.), The Great Ape Project. Fourth Estate. 152--157.score: 30.0
    A few years ago I set out to canvass the literature on Charles Darwin. I thought it would be a manageable task, but I soon realized what a naïve idea this was. I do not know how many books have been written about him, but there seem to be thousands, and each year more appear.1 Why are there so many? Part of the answer is, of course, that he was a tremendously important figure in the history of human thought. But (...)
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  37. Mark Hannam (1988). The Mind of God and the Works of Man. [REVIEW] Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 17.score: 30.0
    A review of Edward Craig's book, "The Mind of God and the Works of Man", published by Oxford University Press in 1987.
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  38. Raymond D. Bradley, Did Einstein Believe in God?score: 30.0
    On the face of it, the answer is "Yes." Hence it is not surprising that many people who say they believe in God like to appeal to Einstein's authority in defense of their own beliefs. It gives them comfort to be able to say that such a great man shared their religious beliefs.
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  39. K. Vaux (1999). Law and Lamb: AKEDAH and the Search for a Deep Religious Symbol for an Ecumenical Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 5 (3):213-219.score: 30.0
    This essay looks at the concept of AKEDAH, the essence of which is the travail of the human condition and the trust in vindication and victory, as a salient and deep metaphor for bioethics. The author first delineates the symbol, then shows its theological and ethical significance, and finally suggests its bioethical applications. The LORD said, “Go get Isaac, your only son, the one you dearly love! Take him to the land of Moriah, and I will show you a mountain (...)
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  40. Nicholas Humphrey, Follow My Leader.score: 30.0
    Ian Kershaw, in his new biography of Hitler2, quotes a teenage girl, writing to celebrate Hitler’s 50th birthday in April 1939: “a great man, a genius, a person sent to us from heaven”. What kind o f design-flaw in human nature could be responsible for such a seemingly grotesque piece of hero-worship? Why do people in general fall so easily under the sway of dictators?
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  41. Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.score: 30.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
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  42. Jiaxiang Hu (2011). Mencius' Aesthetics and its Position. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):41-56.score: 30.0
    Mencius’ aesthetics unfolded around the ideal personality in his mind. Such an ideal personality belonged to a great man who was sublime, practical and honorable, and it was presented as the beauty of magnificence or the beauty of masculinity. Mencius put forward many propositions such as the completed goodness that is brightly displayed is called greatness, nourishing one’s grand qi 气 (the great morale personality), only after a man is a sage can he completely suits himself to his (...)
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  43. Desh Raj Sirswal, Dr. B.R.Ambedkar ‘s Critique of Democracy in India.score: 30.0
    Various philosophers, political scientists and writers have given numerous ideas on democracy. Dr. B.R. Ambedkar was a relentless champion of human rights and staunch believer in democracy, he said: “Democracy is not a form of government, but a form of social organisation.” In “Prospects of Democracy in India” he analyzed Indian Democracy and said a democracy is more than a form of government. It is primarily a mode of associated living. The roots of democracy are to be searched in the (...)
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  44. Miodrag Cekic (1990). Philosophie der Philosophiegeschichte von Hegel Bis Hartmann. Man and World 23 (1):1-22.score: 30.0
    In this paper the author discusses the conceptions of the subject and the method of the history of philosophy by Hegel, Windelband, Dilthey, Hartmann, and other philosophers of the history of philosophy. The history of philosophy as a philosophical discipline was first connected by Hegel with the very system of philosophy. His history of philosophy was the closing and integrating part of his philosophical system. The critics have accepted the view that Hegel had determined the intrinsic regularity of the historico-philosophical (...)
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  45. Hermann Lübbe (1972). Philosophie Als Aufklärung. Man and World 5 (1):38-61.score: 30.0
    It cannot be stated with certainty that the process of enlightenment (Aufklärung) is irreversible. In many systems the tendency to dogmatize the ideologies by means of which political systems define their identity, invariably dominates the emancipatory tendencies of the intelligentsia. In recent years it has become clear that one has to add to this the fact that in the context of the international student youth movement, part of the intelligentsia is unmistakably fascinated by what dogmatism has been able to achieve (...)
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  46. Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.score: 30.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
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  47. Gertrude Himmelfarb (2006). The Moral Imagination: From Edmund Burke to Lionel Trilling. Ivan R. Dee.score: 30.0
    Edmund Burke : apologist for Judaism? -- George Eliot : the wisdom of Dorothea -- Jane Austen : the education of Emma -- Charles Dickens : "a low writer" -- Benjamin Disraeli : the Tory imagination -- John Stuart Mill : the other Mill -- Walter Bagehot : "a divided nature" -- John Buchan : an untimely appreciation -- The Knoxes : a God-haunted family -- Michael Oakeshott : the conservative disposition -- Winston Churchill : "quite simply, a great (...)
     
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  48. Robert Owen (1969). Robert Owen on Education. London, Cambridge U.P..score: 30.0
    Robert Owen was one of the most extraordinary Englishmen who ever lived and a great man. In a way his history is the history of the establishment of modern industrial Britain, reflected in the mind and activities of a very intelligent, capable and responsible industrialist, alive to the best social thought of his time. The organisation of industrial labour, factory legislation, education, trade unionism, co-operation, rationalism: he was passionately and ably engaged in all of them. His community at New (...)
     
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  49. Vickie Sullivan (2006). Against the Despotism of a Republic: Montesquieu's Correction of Machiavelli in the Name of the Security of the Individual. History of Political Thought 27 (2):263-289.score: 30.0
    Montesquieu calls Machiavelli a 'great man' in his Spirit of the Laws, and commentators have demonstrated his knowledge of and indebtedness to the Florentine. Careful consideration of his treatment of Machiavelli in this work, however, suggests that Montesquieu has grave misgivings regarding Machiavelli's form of republicanism. Indeed, far from regarding Machiavelli's republicanism as an embodiment of liberty, the Frenchman suggests that it is actually despotic because it too readily sacrifices the security of the individual in the name of the (...)
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  50. Cheryl Lans (2008). Man Better Man: The Politics of Disappearance. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (4):429-436.score: 24.0
    The discourses of Antillanité and Créolité are both based on the absence of women. This is more important in the discourse of Créolité since it silences the grandmothers, great aunts and village midwives who are the transmitters of folk tales, folk medicines and oral culture. In the struggle for recognition between Caribbean males and western males folk medicine may be too closely associated with the denigrated female role to be considered a suitable inclusion into modern development.
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