Search results for 'Great Man' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  34
    Naoko Saito (2011). From Meritocracy to Aristocracy: Towards a Just Society for the 'Great Man'. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):95-109.
    In the practice of education and educational reforms today ‘meritocracy’ is a prevalent mode of thinking and discourse. Behind political and economic debates over the just distribution of education benefits, other kinds of philosophical issues, concerning the question of democracy, await to be addressed. As a means of evoking a language more subtle than what is offered by political and economic solutions, I shall discuss Ralph Waldo Emerson's idea of perfectionism, particularly his ideas of the ‘gleam of light’ and ‘genius’, (...)
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  2.  2
    Michele Valerie Ronnick (2016). Historical Agency and the “Great Man” in Classical Greece by Sarah Brown Ferrario. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (3):427-428.
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  3.  8
    G. K. Chesterton (2002). A Great Man and a Myth. The Chesterton Review 28 (1/2):3-6.
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  4.  6
    Michael A. Flower (2007). Not Great Man History: Reconceptualizing a Course on Alexander the Great. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 100 (4):417-423.
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  5.  2
    Robert Stout (1929). A Great Man's Life. Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 7 (3):225-228.
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  6.  1
    Roel Konijnendijk (2015). Ferrario Historical Agency and the ‘Great Man’ in Classical Greece. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Pp. Xiii + 409. £65. 9781107037342. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 135:218-219.
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  7.  9
    John P. Ferre (1995). A 'Great Man' Approach: A Book Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):55 – 56.
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  8.  7
    John Atkinson (2005). A Less Heroic Alexander I. Worthington: Alexander the Great: Man and God . Pp. Xx + 251, Maps, Ills, Pls. Harlow: Pearson Longman, 2004. Cased, £19.99. ISBN: 0-582-77224-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):589-.
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  9.  1
    Leslie White (1948). Ikhnaton: The Great Man Vs. The Culture Process. Journal of the American Oriental Society 68 (2):91-114.
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  10.  1
    Michael A. Flower (2007). Not Great Man History. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 100 (4):417-423.
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  11.  1
    Robert Stout (1929). A Great Man's Life. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):225 – 228.
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  12. John Atkinson (2005). Review: Alexander the Great: Man and God. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (2):589-591.
     
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  13. William Edgerton (1948). 'The Great Man': A Note On Methods. Journal of the American Oriental Society 68 (4):192-193.
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  14. B. Gerlach (1998). Who Was the 'Great Man', Who Prepared the Theory of Space of Transcendental Idealism? (Kant, Moses Mendelssohn). Kant-Studien 89 (1):1-34.
  15. J. Hen (1999). The Jester--The Great Man. Dialogue and Universalism 9:94-110.
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  16. F. S. Marvin (1929). The Great Man. Hibbert Journal 28:664.
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  17.  9
    Paul Glenn (2001). The Great Health: Spiritual Disease and the Task of the Higher Man. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (2):100-117.
    Nietzsche's harsh attacks on modernity suggest a problem: if the modern age is so diseased, can we overcome it and move on to something higher? Or is the disease too severe? I examine the question by studying Nietzsche's view of spiritual health. Spiritual illness, even in the highest man, is nothing unusual or necessarily debilitating. Even the strongest have been infected since the earliest days of civilization. Indeed, infection with slave morality and bad conscience are requirements for spiritual elevation. And (...)
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  18. Rani Lill Anjum & Stephen Mumford, With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility - On Causation and Responsibility in Spider-Man, and Possibly Moore. Critical Essays on "Causation and Responsibility".
  19.  10
    John Coates (1996). Joseph Chamberlain: Entrepreneur in Politics, by Peter T. Marsh; Younghusband: The Last Great Imperial Adventurer, by Patrick French; and Rabindranath Tagore: The Myriad-Minded Man, by Krishna Dutta and Andrew Robinson. The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):158-167.
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  20.  5
    L. S. F. (1963). Man and His Destiny in the Great Religions. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):798-798.
  21.  3
    Conrad Black (2012). Murdoch, Like Napoleon, is a Great Bad Man. The Chesterton Review 38 (1-2):296-298.
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  22.  2
    Paul Brazier (2010). English Hypothetical Universalism: John Preston the Softening of Reformed Theology. By Jonathon D. Moore and John Owen: Reformed Catholic, Renaissance Man (Great Theologians Series). By Carl R. Trueman. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (1):140-142.
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  23. Charles Blount, Gildon & John Milton (1695). The Miscellaneous Works of Charles Blount, Esq Containing I. The Oracles of Reason, &C. Ii. Anima Mundi, or the Opinions of the Ancients Concerning Man's Soul After This Life, According to Uninlightned Nature. Iii. Great is Diana of the Ephesians, or the Original of Priestcraft and Idolatry, and of the Sacrifices of the Gentiles. Iv. An Appeal From the Country to the City for the Preservation of His Majesties Person, Liberty and Property, and the Protestant Religion. V. A Just Vindication of Learning, and of the Liberty of the Press. Vi. A Supposed Dialogue Betwixt the Late King James and King William on the Banks of the Boyne, the Day Before That Famous Victory. To Which is Prefixed the Life of the Author, and an Account and Vindication of His Death. With the Contents of the Whole Volume. [REVIEW] S.N.].
     
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  24. E. O. James (1962). BRANDON, "Man and His Destiny in the Great Religions". Hibbert Journal 60 (39):355.
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  25. S. F. L. (1963). Man and His Destiny in the Great Religions. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):798-798.
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  26. T. M. & S. G. F. Brandon (1968). Man and His Destiny in the Great Religions. Journal of the American Oriental Society 88 (2):362.
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  27.  4
    Wu Wei Wei (2003). The Tenth Man: The Great Joke (Which Made Lazarus Laugh). Sentient Publications.
    An esssential work of this enigmatic sage, draws from the ancient traditions of Buddhism, Taosim, and Advaita Vedanta.
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  28.  24
    Leonid Grinin (2010). The Role of the Individual in History: A Reconsideration. Social Evolution and History 9 (2).
    This article is devoted to the significant at all times and sounding anew in every epoch problem of the role of an individual (also a Hero, Great Man) in history, including such an aspect as the role of an individual in the process of state formation and progress. It is argued that in the age of globalization, when the humankind has found itself at the new developmental turning point, in the epoch when the influence of various individuals could affect (...)
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  29.  10
    Jonathan J. Sanford (ed.) (2012). Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry. John Wiley & Sons, Inc..
    _Untangle the complex web of philosophical dilemmas of Spidey and his world—in time for the release of _The Amazing Spider-Man_ movie_ Since Stan Lee and Marvel introduced Spider-Man in _Amazing Fantasy_ #15 in 1962, everyone’s favorite webslinger has had a long career in comics, graphic novels, cartoons, movies, and even on Broadway. In this book some of history’s most powerful philosophers help us explore the enduring questions and issues surrounding this beloved superhero: Is Peter Parker to blame for the death (...)
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  30.  8
    Gary James Jason (2016). Movie Review Of: The Man Who Knew Infinity. Liberty 6.
    This is a review of the biopic of the great mathematician Ramanujan, 'The Man Who Knew Infinity'(2016).
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  31. Carlo Cercignani (1998). Ludwig Boltzmann: The Man Who Trusted Atoms. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The book presents the life and personality, the scientific and philosophical work of Ludwig Boltzmann, one of the great scientists who marked the passage from 19th to 20th century physics. His rich and tragic life, ending by suicide at the age of 62, is described in detail. A substantial part of the book is devoted to discussing his scientific and philosophical ideas and placing them in the context of the second half of the 19th century. The fact that Boltzmann (...)
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  32. Roderick Graham (2004). The Great Infidel: A Life of David Hume. Birlinn.
    This complete life story of David Hume, one of Scotland’s greatest thinkers, follows the Enlightenment from its early roots to its full blossoming in 18th-century Edinburgh. Using original sources, many for the first time, this biography details every aspect of the philosopher’s life—from the lukewarm reception of his now pivotal work, Treatise of Human Nature, to the fame and near excommunication brought about by his famous Essays and History. Also detailed are the stories behind his nickname, “The Great Infidel,” (...)
     
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  33.  7
    Thomas Paine (1995). Rights of Man. Oxford University Press.
    A spirited denunciation of the aristocracy and of hereditary government, The Rights of Man caused outrage in Great Britain with its call for democratic reforms ...
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  34. Tobias Hoffmann (2008). Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas on Magnanimity. In István Pieter Bejczy (ed.), Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages: Commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, 1200 -1500. Brill
    Certain traits of the magnanimous man of the Nicomachean Ethics seem incompatible with gratitude and humility. Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas are the first commentators of the Latin West who had access to the integral portrayal of magnanimity in the Nicomachean Ethics. Surprisingly, they welcomed the Aristotelian ideal of magnanimity without reservations. The paper summarizes Aristotle’s account of magnanimity, discusses briefly the transformation of this notion in Stoicism and early scholasticism, and analyzes Albert’s and Thomas’s interpretation of Aristotle. (...)
     
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  35. Carlo Cercignani (2006). Ludwig Boltzmann: The Man Who Trusted Atoms. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This book presents the life and personality, the scientific and philosophical work of Ludwig Boltzmann, one of the great scientists who marked the passage from 19th- to 20th-Century physics. His rich and tragic life, ending by suicide at the age of 62, is described in detail. A substantial part of the book is devoted to discussing his scientific and philosophical ideas and placing them in the context of the second half of the 19th century. The fact that Boltzmann was (...)
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  36.  3
    Thomas Paine (1969). Rights of Man. Harmondsworth, Penguin.
    A spirited denunciation of the aristocracy and of hereditary government, The Rights of Man caused outrage in Great Britain with its call for democratic reforms ...
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  37.  16
    Richard W. Rousseau (1972). Secular and Christian Images of Man. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 47 (2):165-200.
    Secular images of man show him as alienated and masterful; Christian images as alienated, masterful, and redeemed. The differences are great but there are similarities as well.
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  38.  12
    I. I. Evlampiev (2002). Dostoevsky and Nietzsche: Toward a New Metaphysics of Man. Russian Studies in Philosophy 41 (3):7-32.
    The theme "Dostoevsky and Nietzsche" is one of the most important for understanding the meaning of the abrupt changes that took place in European philosophy and culture at the turn of the nineteenth century. This epoch is still a puzzle: it was a flourishing period for the creative powers of European humanity and at the same time the beginning of the tragic "breakdown" of history that gave birth to two world wars and unprecedented calamities, the consequences of which Europe has (...)
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  39.  5
    Adam Michnik & Agnieszka Marczyk (2012). When Socrates Became Pericles Václav Havel's “Great History,” 1936–2011. Common Knowledge 18 (3):387-418.
    This essay is a memorial tribute from one member of the Common Knowledge editorial board to another. Adam Michnik, a cofounder of the first dissident organization in East-Central Europe, writes about the details and the symbolic importance of his first meeting, in 1978 on Mt. Snĕžka, with Václav Havel, coorganizer of Charter 77. From his insider’s perspective, the author retells the history of dissent in communist Europe from that time until the Velvet Revolution and Havel’s election as president of Czechoslovakia (...)
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  40.  17
    Bat-Ami Bar On (1987). Could There Be a Humean Sex-Neutral General Idea of Man? Philosophy Research Archives 13:367-377.
    In this paper I suggest that the Humean male and Humean female of Hume’s Treatise would have different mental lives due to a great extent to what Hume takes to be the socio-culture in place. Specifically, I show that the Humean male would be incapable but the Humean female would be capable of forming a Humean sex-neutral general idea of man. The Humean male’s inability is not innate but the result of the trauma he experiences when discovering sexuality, reproduction (...)
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  41.  5
    R. G. Muehlmann (1996). George Berkeley: Idealism and the Man. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):305-306.
    BOOK REVIEWS $0 5 David Berman. George Ber~ley: Idealism anti the Man. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994. Pp. xi + 230. Cloth, $42.00. Professor Berman's focus on Berkeley is more on "the Man" than on the metaphysics and this engaging study will therefore be of greater value to those with a historical, rather than a philosophical, interest in the good bishop. The book is aptly subtitled, particularly if we understand 'idealism' in its first, or Platonic sense , rather than just (...)
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  42.  7
    Elfed Huw Price (2012). Do Brains Think? Comparative Anatomy and the End of the Great Chain of Being in 19th-Century Britain. History of the Human Sciences 25 (3):32-50.
    The nature of the relationship between mind and body is one of the greatest remaining mysteries. As such, the historical origin of the current dominant belief that mind is a function of the brain takes on especial significance. In this article I aim to explore and explain how and why this belief emerged in early 19th-century Britain. Between 1815 and 1819 two brain-based physiologies of mind were the subject of controversy and debate in Britain: the system of phrenology devised by (...)
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  43. J. H. Brumfitt (1978). Diderot: Man and Society: J. H. Brumfitt. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 12:162-183.
    Principal editor of the great Encyclopedia , novelist and prose writer of genius, contributor to the development of scientific thought and method, to the theory of the bourgeois drama and to the practice of art criticism, Diderot perhaps embodies the rich variety of the Enlightenment spirit more than any other man. His only real rival is surely Voltaire. Rousseau, whose influence was greater than Diderot's, would not thank us for classing him among the philosophes . The more profound philosophers (...)
     
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  44.  10
    A. S. Garbuzov (1985). The Conception of Man in the Philosophy of Erich Fromm. Russian Studies in Philosophy 24 (2):41-61.
    Erich Fromm occupies a special place among the representatives of the Frankfurt School. Throughout nearly all of his creative life he systematically investigated the special problems of man from the standpoints of psychoanalysis, philosophical anthropology and social psychology. At the same time he is one of the most prominent advocates and "modifiers" of the psychoanalytic theory of Sigmund Freud. Fromm contributed a great deal, particularly in the period of his activity in the USA, to the conversion of this theory (...)
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  45.  4
    Robert L. Carringer (1975). "Citizen Kane", "The Great Gatsby", and Some Conventions of American Narrative. Critical Inquiry 2 (2):307-325.
    It is widely thought that what finally characterizes American literary narratives is a preoccupation with Americanness. If the "great theme" of European fiction has been "man's life in society," Walter Allen writes in The Modern Novel, "the great theme of American fiction has been the exploration of what it means to be an American." The best American film narratives also seem to bear out this proposition, especially those of the great American naturals like Griffith and Ford and (...)
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  46.  3
    Troy Re Paddock (2013). “No Man's Land”: Forbidden and Subversive Space in War. Environment, Space, Place 5 (1):73-84.
    This article explores one of the iconic spaces of the Western Front of the Great War: ‘No Man’s Land.’ It offers an explanation of why one of the most extraordinary events of the First World War, the Christmas Truce of 1914, was only possible in that space. The paper suggests that the subversive nature of the truce required undermined the legitimacy of the state and thus forced state authorities to suppress further similar occurrences.One of the enduring images of World (...)
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  47.  3
    Jennifer Roback Morse (1997). Who is Rational Economic Man? Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):179.
    There is, in Sarajevo, a man who comes out into the streets each day and plays his cello on the sidewalk. He does this at the same time each day, no matter how much shooting or shelling is going on, no matter how great the danger to himself. He describes himself as having decided to take a stand for beauty in the face of horror. Can the rational choice paradigm, as currently practiced in the various disciplines of economics, philosophy, (...)
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  48. Henry Drummond (2009). The Ascent of Man. Cambridge University Press.
    The Lowell Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, founded in 1836, supports an annual series of distinguished lectures. Henry Drummond, the influential Scottish scientist, Free Church minister, explorer and evangelist published his Lowell Lectures as The Ascent of Man in 1894. This provocative book examines Darwinism in a Christian context. It describes the rise of man, who is considered the highest purpose of the universe, and his relations with the lower animals. In particular, it addresses the question of altruism and its role (...)
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  49. Tinsley E. Yarbrough (1992). John Marshall Harlan: Great Dissenter of the Warren Court. Oxford University Press Usa.
    When David Souter was nominated by President Bush to the Supreme Court, he cited John Marshall Harlan as his model. It was an interesting choice. Admired by conservatives and deeply respected by his liberal brethren, Harlan was a man, as Justice William Brennan lamented, whose "massive scholarship" has never been fully recognized. In addition, he was the second Harlan to sit on the Court, following his grandfather--also named John Marshall Harlan. But while his grandfather was an outspoken supporter of reconstruction (...)
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  50. William Irwin & Jonathan J. Sanford (eds.) (2012). Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry. Wiley.
    _Untangle the complex web of philosophical dilemmas of Spidey and his world—in time for the release of _The Amazing Spider-Man_ movie_ Since Stan Lee and Marvel introduced Spider-Man in _Amazing Fantasy_ #15 in 1962, everyone’s favorite webslinger has had a long career in comics, graphic novels, cartoons, movies, and even on Broadway. In this book some of history’s most powerful philosophers help us explore the enduring questions and issues surrounding this beloved superhero: Is Peter Parker to blame for the death (...)
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