Search results for 'Greek drama (Tragedy History and criticism' (try it on Scholar)

15 found
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  1.  19
    Martha Craven Nussbaum (2001). The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a study of ancient views about 'moral luck'. It examines the fundamental ethical problem that many of the valued constituents of a well-lived life are vulnerable to factors outside a person's control, and asks how this affects our appraisal of persons and their lives. The Greeks made a profound contribution to these questions, yet neither the problems nor the Greek views of them have received the attention they deserve. This book thus recovers a central dimension of (...)
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  2. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series (...)
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  3.  26
    Dana LaCourse Munteanu (2012). Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of (...)
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  4.  31
    Richard Seaford (2004). Money and the Early Greek Mind: Homer, Philosophy, Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    How were the Greeks of the sixth century BC able to invent philosophy and tragedy? Richard Seaford argues that a large part of the answer can be found in another momentous development, the invention and rapid spread of coinage. By transforming social relations, monetization contributed to the concepts of the universe as an impersonal system (fundamental to Presocratic philosophy) and of the individual alienated from his own kin and from the gods, as found in tragedy.
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  5.  27
    Peter J. Ahrensdorf (2009). Greek Tragedy and Political Philosophy: Rationalism and Religion in Sophocles' Theban Plays. Cambridge University Press.
    Oedipus the tyrant and the limits of political rationalism -- Blind faith and enlightened statesmanship in Oedipus at colonus -- The pious heroism of Antigone -- Conclusion: Nietzsche, Plato, and Aristotle on philosophy and tragedy.
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  6.  20
    Seth Benardete (2000). The Argument of the Action: Essays on Greek Poetry and Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
    This volume brings together Seth Benardete's studies of Hesiod's Theogony, Homer's Iliad, and Greek tragedy, of eleven Platonic dialogues, and Aristotle's Metaphysics. These essays, some never before published, others difficult to find, span four decades of his work and document its impressive range. Benardete's philosophic reading of the poets and his poetic reading of the philosophers share a common ground that makes this collection a whole. The key, suggested by his reflections on Leo Strauss in the last piece, lies (...)
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  7.  17
    John Sallis (1991). Crossings: Nietzsche and the Space of Tragedy. University of Chicago Press.
    Boldly contesting recent scholarship, Sallis argues that The Birth of Tragedy is a rethinking of art at the limit of metaphysics. His close reading focuses on the complexity of the Apollinian/Dionysian dyad and on the crossing of these basic art impulses in tragedy. "Sallis effectively calls into question some commonly accepted and simplistic ideas about Nietzsche's early thinking and its debt to Schopenhauer, and proposes alternatives that are worth considering."--Richard Schacht, Times Literary Supplement.
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  8.  34
    M. S. Silk & J. P. Stern (1981). Nietzsche on Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive study of Nietzsche's earliest (and extraordinary) book, The Birth of Tragedy (1872). When he wrote it, Nietzsche was a Greek scholar, a friend and champion of Wagner, and a philosopher in the making. His book has been very influential and widely read, but has always posed great difficulties for readers because of the particular way Nietzsche brings his ancient and modern interests together. The proper appreciation of such a work requires access to ideas that (...)
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  9.  10
    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1956). The Birth of Tragedy ; and, the Genealogy of Morals. Anchor Books.
    Skillful, sophisticated translations of two of Nietzsche's essential works about the conflict between the moral and aesthetic approaches to life, the impact of Christianity on human values, the meaning of science, the contrast between the Apollonian and Dionysian spirits, and other themes central to his thinking.
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  10.  17
    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1927). Ecce Homo: And the Birth of Tragedy. The Modern Library.
    Published posthumously in 1908, Ecce Homo was written in 1888 and completed just a few weeks before Nietzsche's complete mental collapse.
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  11. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (2000). The Birth of Tragedy. Oxford University Press.
    In The Birth of Tragedy Nietzsche expounds on the origins of Greek tragedy and its relevance to the German culture of its time. He declares it to be the expression of a culture which has achieved a delicate but powerful balance between Dionysian insight into the chaos and suffering which underlies all existence and the discipline and clarity of rational Apollonian form. In order to promote a return to these values, Nietzsche critiques the complacent rationalism of late nineteenth-century German (...)
     
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  12.  43
    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1993). The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music. Penguin.
    Classic, influential study of Greek tragedy.
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  13.  21
    Douglas Burnham (2010). Nietzsche's the Birth of Tragedy: A Reader's Guide. Continuum.
    Introduction -- Context -- Overview of themes -- Reading the text -- Reception and influence.
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  14. Jan Krauss (2007). Abgeschrieben: Nietzsches "Geburt der Tragödie". La-Mancha-Verlag.
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  15. Gherardo Ugolini (2007). Guida Alla Lettura Della Nascita Della Tragedia di Nietzsche. Laterza.
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