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  1. Greg Carlson, Sherlock Holmes Was In No Danger.
    An important ingredient in understanding such sentences is resolving the question of: level in/of what? protection from what? what sort of documents? danger from what? Each of these is an example coming from novels, television commercials, and news reports. In the first instance, it is from a commercial for a brand of computers. In the commercial, which is pushing the most recent version of that computer, the voice-over announces (1a) just as a teenager exults after having apparently accomplished something worthy (...)
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  2. Natalie M. Klein, Whitney M. Gegg-Harrison, Greg N. Carlson & Michael K. Tanenhaus (2013). Experimental Investigations of Weak Definite and Weak Indefinite Noun Phrases. Cognition 128 (2):187-213.
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  3. Gregory Carlson (2011). Genericity. In Claudia Maienborn, Klaus von Heusinger & Paul Portner (eds.), Semantics: An International Handbook of Natural Language Meaning. De Gruyter Mouton. 2--1153.
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  4. Greg N. Carlson & Francis Jeffry Pelletier (eds.) (2005). Reference and Quantification: The Partee Effect. Csli.
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  5. Gregory N. Carlson (2005). Generics, Habituals and Iteratives. In Alex Barber (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier.
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  6. Greg Carlson, Lisa Cheng, Gennaro Chierchia, Östen Dahl, Mary Dalrymple, Veneeta Dayal, Paul Dekker, Josh Dever, Markus Egg & Martina Faller (2002). 802 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Aaron Broadwell Miriam Butt Alex Byrne. Linguistics and Philosophy 25:801-802.
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  7. Gregory N. Carlson, Francis Jeffry Pelletier & Richmond H. Thomason (2002). Editors'note to the 25th Anniversary Issue. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (505).
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  8. Hana Filip & Gregory N. Carlson (2001). Distributivity Strengthens Reciprocity, Collectivity Weakens It. Linguistics and Philosophy 24 (4):417-466.
    In this paper we examine interactions of the reciprocal with distributive and collective operators, which are encoded by prefixes on verbs expressing the reciprocal relation: namely, the Czech distributive po and the collectivizing na-. The theoretical import of this study is two-fold. First, it contributes to our knowledge of how word-internal operators interact with phrasal syntax/semantics. Second, the prefixes po and na generate (a range of) readings of reciprocal sentences for which the Strongest Meaning Hypothesis (SMH) proposed by Dalrymple et (...)
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  9. Gregory N. Carlson & Francis Jefery Pelletier (2000). Philosophy and Linguistics K. Murasugi and R. Stainton, Editors Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1998, Ix + 285 Pp., $65.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 39 (03):605-.
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  10. Julie C. Sedivy, Michael K. Tanenhaus, Craig G. Chambers & Gregory N. Carlson (1999). Achieving Incremental Semantic Interpretation Through Contextual Representation. Cognition 71 (2):109-147.
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  11. Julie Sedivy, MichaelTanenhaus, Craig Chambers & Gregory Carlson (1999). Achieving Incremental Semantic Interpretation Through Contextual Representation. Cognition 71:109-47.
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  12. Greg Carlson (1998). Names, and What They Are Names Of. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):69-70.
    Terms designating substances and kinds function grammatically much like proper names of individuals. This supports Ruth Millikan's theory, but it also poses the question of how we can understand the reference of kind terms when the ontological status of the kind term is uncertain or disputed.
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  13. Greg N. Carlson & Beverly Spejewski (1997). Generic Passages. Natural Language Semantics 5 (2):101-165.
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  14. Greg N. Carlson (1987). Same and Different: Some Consequences for Syntax and Semantics. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 10 (4):531 - 565.
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  15. Greg N. Carlson (1985). Review. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (4):505-519.
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  16. Greg N. Carlson (1983). Logical Form: Types of Evidence. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 6 (3):295 - 317.
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  17. Greg N. Carlson (1982). Generic Terms and Generic Sentences. Journal of Philosophical Logic 11 (2):145 - 181.
    Whether or not the particular view of generic sentences articulated above is correct, it is quite clear that the study of generic terms and the truth-conditions of generic sentences touches on the representation of other parts of the grammar, as well as on how the world around us is reflected in language. I would hope that the problems mentioned above will highlight the relevance of semantic analysis to other apparently distinct questions, and focus attention on the relevance of linguistic problems (...)
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  18. Greg N. Carlson (1979). Generics and Atemporalwhen. Linguistics and Philosophy 3 (1):49 - 98.
    Beginning with analyses of English generic sentences and English plural indefinite noun phrases (e.g.dogs), we proceed to apply mechanisms there motivated to a characterization of atemporalwhen, a sense ofwhen which does not appear to involve time. Dealt with are such examples as Dogs are intelligent when they have blue eyes, and their relationships to examples like Dogs that have blue eyes are intelligent. The proposed treatment of atemporalwhen helps motivate the existence of a generic verb phrase operator in English, as (...)
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  19. Greg N. Carlson (1977). A Unified Analysis of the English Bare Plural. Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (3):413 - 456.
    It is argued that the English bare plural (an NP with plural head that lacks a determiner), in spite of its apparently diverse possibilities of interpretation, is optimally represented in the grammar as a unified phenomenon. The chief distinction to be dealt with is that between the generic use of the bare plural (as in Dogs bark) and its existential or indefinite plural use (as in He threw oranges at Alice). The difference between these uses is not to be accounted (...)
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  20. Greg N. Carlson (1977). A Unified Treatment of the English Bare Plural. In P. Portner & B. H. Partee (eds.), Formal Semantics - the Essential Readings. Blackwell. 35--75.
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