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Profile: Greg Ray (University of Florida)
  1. Greg Ray, Representative Publications.
    Alfred Tarski (1944) wrote that "the condition of the 'essential richness' of the metalanguage proves to be, not only necessary, but also sufficient for the construction of a satisfactory definition of truth." But it has remained unclear what Tarski meant by an 'essentially richer' metalanguage. Moreover, DeVidi & Solomon (1999) have argued that there is nothing that Tarski could have meant by that phrase which would make his pronouncement true.
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  2. Greg Ray (2014). Meaning and Truth. Mind 123 (489):79-100.
    This paper concerns a key point of decision in Donald Davidson's early work in philosophy of language — a fateful decision that set him and the discourse in the area on the path of truth-theoretic semantics. The decision of moment is the one Davidson makes when, in the face of a certain barrier, he gives up on the idea of constructing an explicit meaning theory that would parallel Tarski's recursive way with truth theory. For Davidson there was little choice: he (...)
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  3. Marc Moffett & Greg Ray (2011). The 37th Annual Meeting of the Society for Exact Philosophy. Synthese 181 (2):181 - 184.
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  4. Greg Ray (2005). On the Matter of Essential Richness. Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (4):433 - 457.
    Alfred Tarski (1944) wrote that "the condition of the 'essential richness' of the metalanguage proves to be, not only necessary, but also sufficient for the construction of a satisfactory definition of truth." But it has remained unclear what Tarski meant by an 'essentially richer' metalanguage. Moreover, DeVidi and Solomon (1999) have argued in this Journal that there is nothing that Tarski could have meant by that phrase which would make his pronouncement true. We develop an answer to the historical question (...)
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  5. Greg Ray (2004). Williamson's Master Argument on Vagueness. Synthese 138 (2):175 - 206.
    According to Timothy Williamson's epistemic view, vague predicates have precise extensions, we just don't know where their boundaries lie. It is a central challenge to his view to explain why we would be so ignorant, if precise borderlines were really there. He offers a novel argument to show that our insuperable ignorance ``is just what independently justified epistemic principles would lead one to expect''. This paper carefully formulates and critically examines Williamson's argument. It is shown that the argument (...)
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  6. Greg Ray (2003). Tarski and the Metalinguistic Liar. Philosophical Studies 115 (1):55 - 80.
    I offer an interpretation of a familiar, but poorly understood portion of Tarskis work on truth – bringing to light a number of unnoticed aspects of Tarskis work. A serious misreading of this part of Tarski to be found in Scott Soames Understanding Truth is treated in detail. Soamesreading vies with the textual evidence, and would make Tarskis position inconsistent in an unsubtle way. I show that Soames does not finally have a coherent interpretation of Tarski. This is unfortunate, since (...)
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  7. Greg Ray (2000). De Re Modality: Lessons From Quine. In A. Orenstein & Petr Kotatko (eds.), Knowledge, Language and Logic: Questions for Quine. Kluwer Academic Print on Demand. 347--365.
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  8. Greg Ray (1999). Introduction. Topoi 18 (2):87-92.
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  9. Kirk Ludwig & Greg Ray (1998). Semantics for Opaque Contexts. Philosophical Perspectives 12 (S12):141--66.
  10. Greg Ray (1997). Fodor and the Inscrutability Problem. Mind and Language 12 (3-4):475-89.
  11. Greg Ray (1996). Logical Consequence: A Defense of Tarski. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 25 (6):617 - 677.
    In his classic 1936 essay "On the Concept of Logical Consequence", Alfred Tarski used the notion of satisfaction to give a semantic characterization of the logical properties. Tarski is generally credited with introducing the model-theoretic characterization of the logical properties familiar to us today. However, in his book, The Concept of Logical Consequence, Etchemendy argues that Tarski's account is inadequate for quite a number of reasons, and is actually incompatible with the standard model-theoretic account. Many of his criticisms are meant (...)
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  12. Greg Ray (1996). Ontology-Free Modal Semantics. Journal of Philosophical Logic 25 (4):333 - 361.
    The problem with model-theoretic modal semantics is that it provides only the formal beginnings of an account of the semantics of modal languages. In the case of non-modal language, we bridge the gap between semantics and mere model theory, by claiming that a sentence is true just in case it is true in an intended model. Truth in a model is given by the model theory, and an intended model is a model which has as domain the actual objects of (...)
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  13. Greg Ray (1996). On the Possibility of a Privileged Class of Logical Terms. Philosophical Studies 81 (2-3):303 - 313.
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  14. Greg Ray (1995). Thinking in L. Noûs 29 (3):378-396.
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  15. Greg Ray (1994). Kripke & the Existential Complaint. Philosophical Studies 74 (2):121 - 135.
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  16. Greg Ray (1992). Probabilistic Causality Reexamined. Erkenntnis 36 (2):219 - 244.
    According to Nancy Cartwright, a causal law holds just when a certain probabilistic condition obtains in all test situations which in turn satisfy a set of background conditions. These background conditions are shown to be inconsistent and, on separate account, logically incoherent. I offer a corrective reformulation which also incorporates a strategy for problems like Hesslow's thrombosis case. I also show that Cartwright's recent argument for modifying the condition to appeal to singular causes fails.Proposed modifications of the theory's probabilistic condition (...)
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