Search results for 'Gregory A. Clark' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Francis Clark (1999). RA Markus, Gregory the Great and'In I Regum'(A Medieval Worldview on Church Ministry and Polity). Heythrop Journal-a Quarterly Review of Philosophy and Theology 40 (2):207-211.score: 1980.0
     
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  2. Stephen Clark (1996). La Contribution de Stephen Clark à la Philosophie Sur Internet. Horizons Philosophiques 6 (2):95.score: 1260.0
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  3. Gregory A. Clark (2002). Reason in Faith. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (3):510-511.score: 870.0
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  4. David A. Mccormick, David G. Lavond, Gregory A. Clark, Ronald E. Kettner, Christina E. Rising & Richard F. Thompson (1981). The Engram Found? Role of the Cerebellum in Classical Conditioning of Nictitating Membrane and Eyelid Responses. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (3):103-105.score: 870.0
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  5. Graham Cairns-Smith, Thomas W. Clark, Ravi Gomatam, Robert H. Kane, Nicholas Maxwell, J. J. C. Smart, Sean A. Spence & Henry P. Stapp (2005). Commentaries on David Hodgson's "a Plain Person's Free Will&Quot;. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):20-75.score: 780.0
    REMARKS ON EVOLUTION AND TIME-SCALES, Graham Cairns-Smith; HODGSON'S BLACK BOX, Thomas Clark; DO HODGSON'S PROPOSITIONS UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE FREE WILL?, Ravi Gomatam; WHAT SHOULD WE RETAIN FROM A PLAIN PERSON'S CONCEPT OF FREE WILL?, Gilberto Gomes; ISOLATING DISPARATE CHALLENGES TO HODGSON'S ACCOUNT OF FREE WILL, Liberty Jaswal; FREE AGENCY AND LAWS OF NATURE, Robert Kane; SCIENCE VERSUS REALIZATION OF VALUE, NOT DETERMINISM VERSUS CHOICE, Nicholas Maxwell; COMMENTS ON HODGSON, J.J.C. Smart; THE VIEW FROM WITHIN, Sean Spence; COMMENTARY ON HODGSON, Henry (...)
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  6. Leigh A. Clark & Sherry J. Roberts (2010). Employer's Use of Social Networking Sites: A Socially Irresponsible Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):507 - 525.score: 600.0
    The Internet has drastically changed how people interact, communicate, conduct business, seek jobs, find partners, and shop. Millions of people are using social networking sites to connect with others, and employers are using these sites as a source of background information on jobapplicants.Employers report making decisions not to hire people based on the information posted on social networking sites. Few employers have policies in place to govern when and how these online character checks should be used and how to ensure (...)
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  7. Andy Clark (2005). Coupling, Constitution and the Cognitive Kind: A Reply to Adams and Aizawa. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. Ashgate.score: 600.0
    Adams and Aizawa, in a series of recent and forthcoming papers ((2001), (In Press), (This Volume)) seek to refute, or perhaps merely to terminally embarrass, the friends of the extended mind. One such paper begins with the following illustration: "Question: Why did the pencil think that 2+2=4? Clark's Answer: Because it was coupled to the mathematician" Adams and Aizawa (this volume) ms p.1 "That" the authors continue "about sums up what is wrong with Clark's extended mind hypothesis". The (...)
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  8. Austen Clark (2000). A Theory of Sentience. New York: Oxford University Press.score: 600.0
    Austen Clark offers a general account of the forms of mental representation that we call "sensory." Drawing on the findings of current neuroscience, Clark defends the hypothesis that the various modalities of sensation share a generic form that he calls "feature-placing." Sensing proceeds by picking out place-times in or around the body of the sentient organism, and characterizing qualities (features) that appear at those place-times. The hypothesis casts light on many other troublesome phenomena, including the varieties of illusion, (...)
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  9. Michael Clark (2007). Paradoxes From A to Z, 2nd Ed. Routledge.score: 600.0
    This essential guide to paradoxes takes the reader on a lively tour of puzzles that have taxed thinkers from Zeno to Galileo and Lewis Carroll to Bertrand Russell. Michael Clark uncovers an array of conundrums, such as Achilles and the Tortoise, Theseus' Ship, Hempel's Raven, and the Prisoners' Dilemma, taking in subjects as diverse as knowledge, ethics, science, art and politics. Clark discusses each paradox in non-technical terms, considering its significance and looking at likely solutions.
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  10. J. F. Ralph, T. D. Clark, H. Prance, R. J. Prance, A. Widom & Y. N. Srivastava (1998). Solutions of the Time-Dependent Schrödinger Equation for a Two-State System. Foundations of Physics 28 (8):1271-1282.score: 600.0
    The statistical properties of a single quantum object and an ensemble of independent such objects are considered in detail for two-level systems. Computer simulations of dynamic zero-point quantum fluctuations for a single quantum object are reported and compared with analytic solutions for the ensemble case.
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  11. Austen Clark, Thoughts on Sensory Representation: A Commentary on S a Theory of Sentience Joseph Levine.score: 600.0
    1. Clark’s book is a detailed study of the nature of sensory representation. It is highly informed by empirical results in the psychology of perception, and philosophically rich and significant. I admire the book and learned a great deal from reading it. As it covers a wide range of topics, and as I have no overarching critique to present, in this commentary I will briefly address three issues that come up in the book: Clark’s relational type-identity thesis for (...)
     
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  12. Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). A Parliament of Souls. Oxford University Press.score: 600.0
    This second volume in the Limits and Renewals trilogy is an attempt to restate a traditional philosophy of mind, drawing on philosophical and poetical resources that are often neglected in modern and postmodern thought, and emphasizing the moral and political implications of differing philosophies of mind and value. Clark argues that without the traditional concept of the soul, we have little reason to believe that rational thought and individual autonomy are either possible or desirable. The particular topics covered include (...)
     
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  13. Ian Clark (1988). Waging War: A Philosophical Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 600.0
    What is war, and how should it be waged? Are there restraints on its conduct? What can philosophers contribute to the study of warfare? Arguing that the practice of war requires a sound philosophical understanding, Ian Clark writes a fascinating synthesis of the philosophy, history, political theory, and contemporary strategy of warfare. Examining the traditional doctrines of the "just" and the "limited" war with fresh insight, Clark also addresses the applicability of these ideas to the modern issues of (...)
     
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  14. Kevin J. O'Regan, Ronald A. Rensink & James J. Clark (1999). Change Blindness as a Result of Mudsplashes. Nature 398 (6722):34-34.score: 580.0
  15. S. Atran, J. N. Bailenson, I. Boutet, A. Chaudhuri, H. H. Clark, J. D. Coley & J. E. Fox Tree (2002). Angrilli, A., B1. Cognition 84:363.score: 580.0
     
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  16. Gayle A. Buck, Vicki L. Plano Clark, Diandra Leslie‐Pelecky, Yun Lu & Particia Cerda‐Lizarraga (2008). Examining the Cognitive Processes Used by Adolescent Girls and Women Scientists in Identifying Science Role Models: A Feminist Approach. Science Education 92 (4):688-707.score: 580.0
  17. A. Clark (2005). Review: Thought in a Hostile World: The Evolution of Human Cognition. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (455):777-782.score: 540.0
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  18. Peter A. Clark (2009). Prejudice and the Medical Profession: A Five-Year Update. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):118-133.score: 540.0
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  19. John A. Clark (1936). A Definition of the Good. Journal of Philosophy 33 (16):421-437.score: 540.0
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  20. S. A. Clark, M. S. Seidenberg & M. C. MacDonald (1999). A Probabilistic Constraints Approach to Language Acquisition and Processing-Influences of Content-Based Expectations. Cognitive Science 23 (4):569-588.score: 540.0
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  21. William R. Clark & David A. Johnson (1970). Effects of Instructional Set on Pupillary Responses During a Short-Term Memory Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (2):315.score: 540.0
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  22. Mark A. Clark (forthcoming). Learning Ethics on a Pedagogical Playground. Journal of Medical Humanities:1-4.score: 540.0
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  23. A. D. M. Clark (1998). This Officer Kept Lecturing the Wounded on What to Say Day After Day."[Perhaps This is Why When Questioned Years Later, They All Tell Exactly the Same Story.) Lt Peterson Said He Listened to the Wounded Talking Between Themselves About How the" Sydney" Had Hit Them and Had Caused Large Fires. They Spoke About the" Sydney" Starting to Come Closer After the" Kormoran" Hoisted a White Flag. [REVIEW] Inquiry 55:1.score: 540.0
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  24. Ronald A. Rensink, Kevin J. O'Regan & James J. Clark (2000). On Failures to Detect Changes in Scenes Across Brief Interruptions. Visual Cognition 7 (1-3):127-145.score: 480.0
    When brief blank fields are placed between alternating displays of an original and a modified scene, a striking failure of perception is induced: the changes become extremely difficult to notice, even when they are large, presented repeatedly, and the observer expects them to occur (Rensink, O'Regan, & Clark, 1997). To determine the mechanisms behind this induced "change blindness", four experiments examine its dependence on initial preview and on the nature of the interruptions used. Results support the proposal that representations (...)
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  25. Andy Clark & Rick Grush (1999). Towards a Cognitive Robotics. Adaptive Behavior 7 (1):5-16.score: 420.0
    There is a definite challenge in the air regarding the pivotal notion of internal representation. This challenge is explicit in, e.g., van Gelder, 1995; Beer, 1995; Thelen & Smith, 1994; Wheeler, 1994; and elsewhere. We think it is a challenge that can be met and that (importantly) can be met by arguing from within a general framework that accepts many of the basic premises of the work (in new robotics and in dynamical systems theory) that motivates such scepticism in the (...)
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  26. Andy Clark (2008). Pressing the Flesh: A Tension in the Study of the Embodied, Embedded Mind? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):37–59.score: 420.0
    Mind, it is increasingly fashionable to assert, is an intrinsically embodied and environmentally embedded phenomenon. But there is a potential tension between two strands of thought prominent in this recent literature. One of those strands depicts the body as special, and the fine details of a creature’s embodiment as a major constraint on the nature of its mind: a kind of new-wave body-centrism. The other depicts the body as just one element in a kind of equal-partners dance between brain, body (...)
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  27. Andy Clark (2005). Beyond the Flesh: Some Lessons From a Mole Cricket. Artificial Life 11 (1-2):233-44.score: 420.0
    What do linguistic symbols do for minds like ours, and how (if at all) can basic embodied, dynamical and situated approaches do justice to high-level human thought and reason? These two questions are best addressed together, since our answers to the first may inform the second. The key move in ‘scaling-up’ simple embodied cognitive science is, I argue, to take very seriously the potent role of human-built structures in transforming the spaces of human learning and reason. In particular, in this (...)
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  28. Austen Clark (1985). A Physicalist Theory of Qualia. The Monist 68 (October):491-506.score: 420.0
    Although the capacity to discriminate between different qualia is typically admitted to have a definition in terms of functional role, the qualia thereby related are thought to elude functional definition. In this paper I argue that these views are inconsistent. Given a functional model of discrimination, one can construct from it a definition of qualia. The problem is similar in many ways to Goodman's definition of qualia in terms of 'matching', and I argue that many of his findings survive reinterpretation (...)
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  29. Austen Clark (2006). Attention & Inscrutability: A Commentary on John Campbell, Reference and Consciousness for the Pacific APA Meeting, Pasadena, California, 2004. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):167-193.score: 420.0
    We assemble here in this time and place to discuss the thesis that conscious attention can provide knowledge of reference of perceptual demonstratives. I shall focus my commentary on what this claim means, and on the main argument for it found in the first five chapters of Reference and Consciousness. The middle term of that argument is an account of what attention does: what its job or function is. There is much that is admirable in this account, and I am (...)
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  30. John P. Clark, A Social Ecology.score: 420.0
    community reflecting on itself, uncovering its history, exploring its present predicament, and contemplating its future. [2] One aspect of this awakening is a process of philosophical reflection. As a philosophical approach, a social ecology investigates the ontological, epistemological, ethical and political dimensions of the relationship between the social and the ecological, and seeks the practical wisdom that results from such reflection. It seeks to give us, as beings situated in the course of real human and natural history, guidance in facing (...)
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  31. Andy Clark & Jesse Prinz, Putting Concepts to Work: Some Thoughts for the 21st Century (a Reply to Fodor).score: 420.0
    Fodor’s theory makes thinking prior to doing. It allows for an inactive agent or pure reflector, and for agents whose actions in various ways seem to float free of their own conceptual repertoires. We show that naturally evolved creatures are not like that. In the real world, thinking is always and everywhere about doing. The point of having a brain is to guide the actions of embodied beings in a complex material world. Some of those actions are, to be sure, (...)
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  32. Andy Clark (2008). The Frozen Cyborg: A Reply to Selinger and Engström. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):343-346.score: 420.0
    Selinger and Engstrom, A moratorium on cyborgs: Computation, cognition and commerce, 2008 (this issue) urge upon us a moratorium on ‘cyborg discourse’. But the argument underestimates the richness and complexity of our ongoing communal explorations. It leans on a somewhat outdated version of the machine metaphor (exemplified perhaps by a frozen 1970’s Cyborg). The modern cyborg, informed by an evolving computational model of mind, can play a positive role in the critical discussions that Selinger and Engstrom seek.
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  33. Andy Clark, The Presence of a Symbol.score: 420.0
    The image of the presence of symbols in an inner code pervades recent debates in cognitive science. Classicists worship in the presence. Connectionists revel in the absence. However, the very ideas of code and symbol are ill understood. A major distorting factor in the debates concerns the role of processing in determining the presence or absence of a stuctured inner code. Drawing on work by David Kirsh and David Chambers , the present paper attempts to re-define such notions to begin (...)
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  34. Austen Clark (2010). Color, Qualia, and Attention : A Non-Standard Interpretation. In Jonathan D. Cohen & Mohan Matthen (eds.), Color Ontology and Color Science. Mit Press. 203.score: 420.0
    A standard view in philosophy of mind is that qualia and phenomenal character require consciousness. This paper argues that various experimental and clinical phenomena can be better explained if we reject this assumption. States found in early visual processing can possess qualitative character even though they are not in any sense conscious mental states. This non-standard interpretation bears the burden of explaining what must be added to states that have qualitative character in order to yield states of sensory awareness or (...)
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  35. Austen Clark (2008). Classes of Sensory Classification: A Commentary on Mohan Matthen, "Seeing, Doing, and Knowing". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):400 - 406.score: 420.0
    Forthcoming in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 2008, A book symposium commentary on Mohan Matthen’s Seeing, Doing, and Knowing.
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  36. Andy Clark & Josefa Toribio, Sensorimotor Chauvinism?” Commentary on O'Reagan, J. Kevin and Noë, Alva, “A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness”.score: 420.0
    While applauding the bulk of the account on offer, we question one apparent implication viz, that every difference in sensorimotor contingencies corresponds to a difference in conscious visual experience.
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  37. Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Waking-Up: A Neglected Model for the Afterlife. Inquiry 26 (2):209 – 230.score: 420.0
    An inquiry into the possibility that life?after?death be understood as waking from a shared dream into the real world. Attempts to outlaw the possibility that ?really? we are, e.g., vat?brains are shown to lead to unwelcome, anti?realist conclusions about either the world or consciousness. The unsatisfactory nature of empirically observable (Humean) causal connections suggests that real causes may be found beyond the world of our present experience. Though such a story cannot now be proved to be true, we are entitled (...)
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  38. Austen Clark (2005). Painfulness is Not a Quale. In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press.score: 420.0
    When you suffer a pain are you suffering a sensation? An emotion? An aversion? Pain typically has all three components, and others too. There is indeed a distinct sensory system devoted to pain, with its own nociceptors and pathways. As a species of somesthesis, pain has a distinctive sensory organization and its own special sensory qualities. I think it is fair to call it a distinct sensory modality, devoted to nociceptive somesthetic discrimination. But the typical pain kicks off other processes (...)
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  39. Andy Clark (1993). Superpositional Connectionism: A Reply to Marinov. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 3 (3):271-81.score: 420.0
    Marinov''s critique I argue, is vitiated by its failure to recognize the distinctive role of superposition within the distributed connectionist paradigm. The use of so-called subsymbolic distributed encodings alone is not, I agree, enough to justify treating distributed connectionism as a distinctive approach. It has always been clear that microfeatural decomposition is both possible and actual within the confines of recognizably classical approaches. When such approaches also involve statistically-driven learning algorithms — as in the case of ID3 — the fundamental (...)
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  40. Austen Clark (2008). Classes of Sensory Classification: A Commentary on Mohan Matthen, Seeing, Doing, and Knowing. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):400–406.score: 420.0
    Sensory classification is a central theme of Mohan Matthen's wonderful book, Seeing, Doing, and Knowing. ( All page references are to Matthen 2005 unless otherwise indicated.) My plan for this commentary is simple: I shall list a series of claims that Matthen makes about the classes involved in sensory classification. Each member of the series is admirable, and seems credible on its own. The question at the end is whether we can hold them all, together.
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  41. Tom Clark, The Commitments of Naturalism – a Dialog.score: 420.0
    As a worldview , naturalism depends on a set of cognitive commitments from which flow certain propositions about reality and human nature. These propositions in turn might have implications for how we live, for social policy, and for human flourishing. But the presuppositions, basis, and implications of naturalism are not uncontested, and indeed there’s considerable debate about them among naturalists themselves.
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  42. Philip Clark, Mackie's Motivational Argument Philip Clark.score: 420.0
    Mackie doubted anything objective could have the motivational properties of a value. In thinking we are morally required to act in a certain way, he said, we attribute objective value to the action. Since nothing has objective value, these moral judgments are all false. As to whether Mackie proved his error theory, opinions vary. But there is broad agreement on one issue. A litany of examples, ranging from amoralism to depression to downright evil, has everyone convinced that Mackie vastly overstated (...)
     
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  43. E. Ann Clark & B. R. Christie (1988). A Forage-Based Vision of Ontario Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1 (2):109-121.score: 420.0
    The necessity of incorporating societal and environmental concerns into publicly funded agricultural initiatives in research, extension, and practice is increasingly evident. Agriculturalists are urged to acknowledge and respond to societal concerns before an insensitive and largely ill-informed urban majority assumes a dominant posture in agricultural policy. In recent history, the availability of unrealistically cheap energy encouraged the evolution of a form of commercial agriculture unfettered by sound ecological principles. At present, external, resource-intensive intervention of increasing magnitude is needed to compensate (...)
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  44. Andy Clark & Josefa Toribio, Commentary on J.K O'Regan and A Noe: A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness.score: 420.0
    O'Regan and Noe present a wonderfully detailed and comprehensive defense of a position whose broad outline we absolutely and unreservedly endorse. They are right, it seems to us, to stress the intimacy of conscious content and embodied action, and to counter the idea of a Grand Illusion with the image of an agent genuinely in touch, via active exploration, with the rich and varied visual scene. This is an enormously impressive achievement, and we hope that the comments that follow will (...)
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  45. Michael Clark (2002). Paradoxes From A to Z. Routledge.score: 420.0
    This essential guide to paradoxes takes the reader on a lively tour of puzzles that have taxed thinkers from Zeno to Galileo ...
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  46. Jason Clark (2012). Integrating Basic and Higher-Cognitive Emotions Within a Common Evolutionary Framework: Lessons From the Transformation of Primate Dominance Into Human Pride. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):437-460.score: 420.0
    Many argue that higher-cognitive emotions such as pride arose de novo in humans, and thus fall outside of the scope of the kinds of evolutionary explanations offered for ?basic emotions,? like fear. This approach fractures the general category of ?emotion? into two deeply distinct kinds of emotion. However, an increasing number of emotion researchers are converging on the conclusion that higher-cognitive emotions are evolutionarily rooted in simpler emotional responses found in primates. I argue that pride fits this pattern, and then (...)
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  47. Gianluca Giorgolo, Shalom Lappin & Alexander Clark, Towards a Statistical Model of Grammaticality.score: 420.0
    The question of whether it is possible to characterise grammatical knowledge in probabilistic terms is central to determining the relationship of linguistic representation to other cognitive domains. We present a statistical model of grammaticality which maps the probabilities of a statistical model for sentences in parts of the British National Corpus (BNC) into grammaticality scores, using various functions of the parameters of the model. We test this approach with a classifier on test sets containing different levels of syntactic infelicity. With (...)
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  48. L. Obolensky, T. Clark, G. Matthew & M. Mercer (2010). A Patient and Relative Centred Evaluation of Treatment Escalation Plans: A Replacement for the Do-Not-Resuscitate Process. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):518-520.score: 420.0
    The Treatment Escalation Plan (TEP) was introduced into our trust in an attempt to improve patient involvement and experience of their treatment in hospital and to embrace and clarify a wider remit of treatment options than the Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order currently offers. Our experience suggests that the patient and family are rarely engaged in DNR discussions. This is acutely relevant considering that the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) now obliges these discussions to take place. The TEP is a form (...)
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  49. Gordon Sammut, Marilyn Clark & Greta Darmanin Kissaun (2014). Dialogue, Linguistic Hinges and Semantic Barriers: Social Psychological Uses and Functions of a Vulgar Term. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (3):326-346.score: 420.0
    The present paper reports a study of conversational acts in dialogical interaction. Conversation in which the use of a vulgar term [à la bieb żobbi] in the Maltese language was used was recorded and analysed for the present purpose. The term is demonstrated to serve social psychological functions. We documented three modes governing its use in conversation, that is, (a) as a personality descriptor, (b) as a strategy for shutting down an alternative view, and (c) as a strategy for shifting (...)
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