143 found
Sort by:
  1. Gregory Currie, Art and the Anthropologists.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Gregory Currie, Characters and Contingency.
    One way creatures of fiction seem to differ from real things is in their essential properties. While you and I might not have done many of the things we did do, Anna Karenina could not, surely, have been other than a lover of Vronsky. Is that right? Not straightforwardly: while it is true that “Necessarily, someone who was not a lover of Vronsky would not be Anna”, it is also true that “Someone who was necessarily a lover of Vronsky would (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Gregory Currie (2014). Standing in the Last Ditch: On the Communicative Intentions of Fiction Makers. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (4):351-363.
    Some of us have suggested that what fiction makers do is offer us things to imagine, that this is what is distinctive of fiction and what distinguishes it from narrative-based but assertive activities such as journalism or history. Some of us hold, further, that it is the maker's intention which confers fictional status. Many, I think, feel the intuitive appeal of this idea at the same time as they sense looming problems for any proposal about fiction's nature based straightforwardly on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Gregory Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin & Margaret Moore (eds.) (2014). Philosophical Aesthetics and the Sciences of Art: Volume 75. Cambridge University Press.
    Musical listening, looking at paintings and literary creation are activities that involve perceptual and cognitive activity and so are of interest to psychologists and other scientists of the mind. What sorts of interest should philosophers of the arts take in scientific approaches to such issues? Opinion currently ranges across a spectrum, with 'take no notice' at one end and 'abandon traditional philosophical methods' at the other. This collection of essays, originating in a Royal Institute of Philosophy conference at the Leeds (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Gregory Currie (2013). On the Enjoyment of Tragedy. Rivista di Estetica 53 (2):7-24.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Gregory Currie (2013). Sul Godimento Della Tragedia. Rivista di Estetica 53 (53):7-24.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Gregory Currie (2013). To Do aestheticsI. In Matthew C. Haug (ed.), Philosophical Methodology: The Armchair or the Laboratory? Routledge 435.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Gregory Currie (2012). Nota sobre arte e conceitos históricos. Critica.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Gregory Currie (2012). Literature and Truthfulness. In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor. 23-31.
    How should we characterise the view that we can learn about the mind from literature? Should we say that such learning consists in acquiring knowledge of truths? That option is more attractive than it is sometimes made to seem by those who oppose propositional knowledge to practical knowledge or “knowing how”. But some writers on this topic—Lamarque and Olsen—argue that, while literature may express interesting propositions, it is not their truth that matters, but their “content”. Matters to what? To literary (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Gregory Currie, Petr Kotatko & Martin Pokorny (eds.) (2012). Mimesis: Metaphysics, Cognition, Pragmatics. College Publications.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Gregory Currie (2011). As obras de arte como tipos de acções. Critica.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Gregory Currie (2011). Empathy for Objects1. In Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.), Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press 82.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Gregory Currie (2011). The Master of the Masek Beds: Handaxes, Art, and the Minds of Early Humans1. In Elisabeth Schellekens & Peter Goldie (eds.), The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press 9.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Gregory Currie (2011). Telling Stories. The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):44-49.
    As Dr Johnson said, argument is like a crossbow: it owes its force to the mechanisms of the bow, as argument owes its force to its intrinsic rational power. But testimony is like the longbow: we cannot tell what it will do unless we know the strength of the user.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Gregory Currie (2010). Bergman and the Film Image. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):323-339.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Gregory Currie (2010). Narratives and Narrators: A Philosophy of Stories. Oxford University Press.
    This text offers a reflection on the nature and significance of narrative in human communication.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Gregory Currie (2010). Narrative, Imitation, and Point of View. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Gregory Currie (2010). Q & A. The Philosophers' Magazine 49 (49):114-115.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Gregory Currie (2010). Actual Art, Possible Art, and Art's Definition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):235-241.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. John Worrall & Gregory Currie (eds.) (2010). Mathematics, Science and Epistemology: Volume 2, Philosophical Papers. Cambridge University Press.
    Imre Lakatos' philosophical and scientific papers are published here in two volumes. Volume I brings together his very influential but scattered papers on the philosophy of the physical sciences, and includes one important unpublished essay on the effect of Newton's scientific achievement. Volume 2 presents his work on the philosophy of mathematics , together with some critical essays on contemporary philosophers of science and some famous polemical writings on political and educational issues.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Gregory Currie (2009). Narrative and the Psychology of Character. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (1):61-71.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Gregory Currie (2009). The Ontology of Conceptual Art. In Peter Goldie & Elisabeth Schellekens (eds.), Philosophy and Conceptual Art. OUP Oxford
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Gregory Currie (2008). Écho et feintise : quelle est la différence et qui a raison ? Philosophiques 35 (1):13.
    Dans un essai antérieur j’ai défendu une version de la théorie de l’ironie comme feintise — selon laquelle l’ironiste prétend adopter une perspective qui est en quelque sorte déficiente. J’ai aussi comparé cette version de la théorie de la feintise avec la théorie échoïque de Sperber et Wilson, en concluant que la théorie de la feintise était supérieure. Deirdre Wilson a répondu à cet article . Dans le présent article, je réponds aux contre-arguments de Wilson. Je fournis aussi un contre-exemple (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Gregory Currie (2008). Some Ways to Understand People. Philosophical Explorations 11 (3):211 – 218.
    Shaun Gallagher and Dan Hutto claim that those once bitter rivals, simulation theory and theory-theory, are now to be treated as partners in crime. It's true that the debate has become more nuanced, with detailed suggestions abroad as to how these two approaches might peaceably divide the field. And there is common ground between them, at least to the extent that they agree on what needs to be explained. But I see no fatal flaw in what they share. In particular, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Gregory Currie (2007). Both Sides of the Story: Explaining Events in a Narrative. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 135 (1):49 - 63.
    Our experience of narrative has an internal and an external aspect--the content of the narrative’s representations, and its intentional, communicative aetiology. The interaction of these two things is crucial to understanding how narrative works. I begin by laying out what I think we can reasonably expect from a narrative by way of causal information, and how causality interacts with other attributes we think of as central to narrative. At a certain point this discussion will strike a problem: our judgements about (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Gregory Currie (2007). Framing Narratives. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (60):17-.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Gregory Currie (2007). Visual Conceptual Art. In Peter Goldie & Elisabeth Schellekens (eds.), Philosophy and Conceptual Art. Oxford University Press 33.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Gregory Currie (2006). Narrative Representation of Causes. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (3):309–316.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Gregory Currie (2006). Rationality, Decentring, and the Evidence for Pretence in Nonhuman Animals. In Susan L. Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford University Press
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Gregory Currie (2006). Why Irony is Pretence. In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Clarendon Press
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Gregory Currie & Nicholas Jones (2006). McGinn on Delusion and Imagination. Philosophical Books 47 (4):306-313.
  32. Gregory Currie (2004). Arts and Minds. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical questions about the arts go naturally with other kinds of questions about them. Art is sometimes said to be an historical concept. But where in our cultural and biological history did art begin? If art is related to play and imagination, do we find any signs of these things in our nonhuman relatives? Sometimes the other questions look like ones the philosopher of art has to answer. Anyone who thinks that interpretation in the arts is an activity that leaves (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Gregory Currie (2004). Genre. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Gregory Currie (2004). Introduction. Mind and Language 19 (4):359–359.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Gregory Currie (2004). The Representational Revolution. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (2):119–128.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Gregory Currie & Jon Jureidini (2004). Narrative and Coherence. Mind and Language 19 (4):409–427.
  37. Gregory Currie & Ian Ravenscroft (2004). Recreative Minds. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (4):406-407.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Gregory Currie (2003). Aesthetics and Cognitive Science. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press 706--721.
  39. Gregory Currie (2003). Interpretation in Art. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press 291--306.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Gregory Currie (2003). The Capacities That Enable Us to Produce and Consume Art. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge 293--304.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Gregory Currie (2002). Desire in Imagination. In Tamar S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Conceivability and Possibility. Oxford University Press 201-221.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Gregory Currie (2002). Imagination as Motivation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (3):201-16.
    What kinds of psychological states motivate us? Beliefs and desires are the obvious candidates. But some aspects of our behaviour suggest another idea. I have in mind the view that imagination can sometimes constitute motivation.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Gregory Currie & Ian Ravenscroft (2002). Recreative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Recreative Minds develops a philosophical theory of imagination that draws upon the latest work in psychology. This theory illuminates the use of imagination in coming to terms with art, its role in enabling us to live as social beings, and the psychological consequences of disordered imagination. The authors offer a lucid exploration of a fascinating subject.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Gregory Currie (2001). Imagination and Make-Believe. In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Gregory Currie (2001). Methodological Individualism. In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 9755--60.
  46. Gregory Currie (2001). Response to Jinhee Choi. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (3):319–319.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Gregory Currie & Jon Jureidini (2001). Delusion, Rationality, Empathy. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 8 (2-3):159-62.
  48. Gregory Currie (2000). Imagination, Delusion and Hallucinations. In Max Coltheart & Martin Davies (eds.), Mind and Language. Blackwell 168-183.
    Chris Frith has argued that a loss of the sense of agency is central to schizophrenia. This suggests a connection between hallucinations and delusions on the one hand, and the misidentification of the subject’s imaginings as perceptions and beliefs on the other. In particular, understanding the mechanisms that underlie imagination may help us to explain the puzzling phenomena of thought insertion and withdrawal. Frith sometimes states his argument in terms of a loss of metarepresentational capacity in schizophrenia. I argue that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Gregory Currie (2000). Imagination, Hallucination and Delusion. Mind and Language 15 (1):168-183.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Gregory Currie (2000). Preserving the Traces: An Answer to Noël Carroll. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):306-308.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 143