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Gregory J. Morgan [14]Gregory J. . Morgan [1]
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Profile: Gregory J Morgan (Stevens Institute of Technology)
  1. Gregory J. Morgan (forthcoming). Scientific Values and Civic Virtues, Edited by Noretta Koertge. Mind:fzt098.
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  2. Gregory J. Morgan (2013). The Value of Beauty in Theory Pursuit: Kuhn, Duhem, and Decision Theory. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):9-14.
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  3. Gregory J. Morgan (2011). Achinstein and Whewell on Theoretical Coherence. In , Philosophy of Science Matters: The Philosophy of Peter Achinstein. Oxford University Press. 151.
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  4. Gregory J. Morgan (ed.) (2011). Philosophy of Science Matters: The Philosophy of Peter Achinstein. Oxford University Press.
    In this, the first book devoted to Peter Achinstein's influential work in philosophy of science, twenty distinguished philosophers, including four Lakatos award ...
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  5. Gregory J. Morgan (2010). Evaluating Maclaurin and Sterelny's Conception of Biodiversity in Cases of Frequent, Promiscuous Lateral Gene Transfer. Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):603-621.
    The recent conception of biodiversity proposed by James Maclaurin and Sterelny was developed mostly with macrobiological life in mind. They suggest that we measure biodiversity by dividing life into natural units (typically species) and quantifying the differences among units using phenetic rather than phylogenetic measures of distance. They identify problems in implementing quantitative phylogenetic notions of difference for non-prokaryotic species. I suggest that if we focus on microbiological life forms that engage in frequent, promiscuous lateral gene transfer (LGT), and their (...)
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  6. Gregory J. Morgan (2010). Heather Douglas: Is Science Value-Free? (Science, Policy, and the Value-Free Ideal). Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (2):423-426.
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  7. Gregory J. Morgan (2010). Laws of Biological Design: A Reply to John Beatty. Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):379-389.
    In this paper, I argue against John Beatty’s position in his paper “The Evolutionary Contingency Thesis” by counterexample. Beatty argues that there are no distinctly biological laws because the outcomes of the evolutionary processes are contingent. I argue that the heart of the Caspar–Klug theory of virus structure—that spherical virus capsids consist of 60T subunits (where T = k 2 + hk + h 2 and h and k are integers)—is a distinctly biological law even if the existence of spherical (...)
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  8. Gregory J. Morgan (2009). The Many Dimensions of Biodiversity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 40 (3):235-238.
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  9. Gregory J. Morgan & W. Brad Pitts (2008). Evolution Without Species: The Case of Mosaic Bacteriophages. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):745-765.
    College of Medicine, University of South Alabama Mobile, AL 36688-0002, USA wbp501{at}jaguar1.usouthal.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Recent work in viral genomics has shown that bacteriophages exhibit a high degree of mosaicism, which is most likely due to a long history of prolific horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Given these findings, we argue that each of the most plausible attempts to properly classify bacteriophages into distinct species fail. Mayr's biological species concept fails because there is (...)
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  10. Gregory J. Morgan (2008). Mohan Matthen and Christopher Stephens:Handbook of the Philosophy of Science: Philosophy of Biology,:Handbook of the Philosophy of Science: Philosophy of Biology. Philosophy of Science 75 (2):246-249.
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  11. Gregory J. Morgan (2008). Review of the Evolution of Morality, by Richard Joyce. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 39 (4-5):685-690.
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  12. Gregory J. Morgan (2007). Prioritizing the Transformative Value of Biodiversity. Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):627-632.
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  13. Gregory J. Morgan (2006). Why There Was a Useful Plausible Analogy Between Geodesic Domes and Spherical Viruses. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (2):215 - 235.
    In 1962, Donald Caspar and Aaron Klug published their classic theory of virus structure. They developed their theory with an explicit analogy between spherical viruses and Buckminster Fuller's geodesic domes. In this paper, I use the spherical virus-geodesic dome case to develop an account of analogy and deductive analogical inference based on the notion of an isomorphism. I also consider under what conditions there is a good reason to claim an experimentally untested analogy is plausible.
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  14. Gregory J. Morgan (2001). Bacteriophage Biology and Kenneth Schaffner's Rendition of Developmentalism. Biology and Philosophy 16 (1):85-92.
    In this paper I consider Kenneth Schaffner''s(1998) rendition of ''''developmentalism'''' from the point of viewof bacteriophage biology. I argue that the fact that a viablephage can be produced from purified DNA and host cellularcomponents lends some support to the anti-developmentalist, ifthey first show that one can draw a principled distinctionbetween genetic and environmental effects. The existence ofhost-controlled phage host range restriction supports thedevelopmentalist''s insistence on the parity of DNA andenvironment. However, in the case of bacteriophage, thedevelopmentalist stands on less firm (...)
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  15. Gregory J. Morgan (1998). Emile Zuckerkandl, Linus Pauling, and the Molecular Evolutionary Clock, 1959-1965. Journal of the History of Biology 31 (2):155 - 178.