Search results for 'Gregory Kane' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Gregory & Laurence B. Mccullough (1998). John Gregory's Writings on Medical Ethics and Philosophy of Medicine.
     
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  2.  5
    Gregory C. Kane (1996). Suicide and Advance Directives: One Doctor's Dilemma. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 17 (3):191-193.
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  3.  5
    John D. Engel, Gregory Kane, Deborah L. Jones, Debra Lynn-McHale, Martha Swartz, Paul Durbin & Don Klingen (1997). The Patient Self-Determination Act and Advance Directives: Snapshots of Activities in a Tertiary Health Care Center. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 18 (3):193-208.
    This study describes the results of a retrospective review of patients' charts who had an advanced directive (AD) and who were hospitalized in a tertiary, acute care teaching hospital. The purpose of the review was to understand from clinical, sociological, ethical and legal perspectives the nature and utility of ADs. Findings and implications of the review are discussed in terms of: patient demographics; diagnoses; quality of ADs; influence of ADs on clinical decisions; and legal aspects of ADs.
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  4. James A. Weisheipl, William Humbert Kane & Ill Dominican College of St Thomas Aquinas Forest (1961). The Dignity of Science Studies in the Philosophy of Science Presented to William Humbert Kane. Thomist Press.
     
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  5.  8
    James A. Weisheipl & William Humbert Kane, The Dignity of Science; Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Presented to William Humbert Kane. Edited, with Introd. By James A. Weisheipl in Collaboration with the Thomist and the Albertus Magnus Lyceum. Pref. By Michael Browne. [REVIEW]
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  6.  10
    Stewart Goetz & Robert Kane (2000). Excerpts From Robert Kane's Discussion with Members of the Audience. Journal of Ethics 4 (4):343 - 347.
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  7.  5
    Charles O. Gregory (1947). Labor and the Law:Labor and the Law. Charles O. Gregory. Ethics 57 (3):206-.
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  8. Richard L. Gregory (1972). Comments on L. E. Krueger's "Disconfirming Evidence" of R. L. Gregory's Theory of Illusions. Psychological Review 79 (6):540-541.
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  9. R. L. Gregory (1981). Mind in Science a History of Explanations in Psychology and Physics /Richard L. Gregory. --. --. Cambridge University Press,1981.
     
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  10. P. F. Kane (1996). Agriculture Liming Materials En Kane PF (Ed.) Official Methods of Analysis of Association of Official Analytical Chemist (AOAC). Method 955:938-945.
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  11. Arvind Sharma & P. Kane (1999). P. V. Kane's Homeric Nod. Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (3):478-479.
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  12. Baruch Spinoza, S. Shirley & Brad Gregory (1989). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition . Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory. Brill.
    This new and complete translation of Spinoza's famous 17th-century work fills an important gap, not only for all scholars of Spinoza, but also for everyone interested in the relationship between Western philosophy and religion, and the history of biblical exegesis.
     
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  13. Baruch Spinoza, S. Shirley & Brad Gregory (1991). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition . Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory. Brill.
    This new and complete translation of Spinoza's famous 17th-century work fills an important gap, not only for all scholars of Spinoza, but also for everyone interested in the relationship between Western philosophy and religion, and the history of biblical exegesis.
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  14. Baruch Spinoza, S. Shirley & Brad Gregory (1989). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition . Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory. Brill.
    This new and complete translation of Spinoza's famous 17th-century work fills an important gap, not only for all scholars of Spinoza, but also for everyone interested in the relationship between Western philosophy and religion, and the history of biblical exegesis.
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  15. Robert H. Kane (1996). The Significance of Free Will. Oxford University Press.
    In the past quarter-century, there has been a resurgence of interest in philosophical questions about free will. After a clear and broad-reaching survey of these recent debates, Robert Kane presents his own controversial view. Arguing persuasively for a traditional incompatibilist or libertarian conception of free will, Kane demonstrates that such a conception can be made intelligible without appeals to obscure or mysterious forms of agency and thus can be reconconciled with a contemporary scientific picture of the world.
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  16. Robert Kane (1998). The Significance of Free Will. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Robert Kane provides a critical overview of debates about free will of the past half century, relating this recent inquiry to the broader history of the free will issue and to vital currents of twentieth century thought. Kane also defends a traditional libertarian or incompatibilist view of free will, employing arguments that are both new to philosophy and that respond to contemporary developments in physics and biology, neuro science, and the cognitive and behavioral sciences.
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  17. Eric Gregory (2010). Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship. University of Chicago Press.
    Augustine—for all of his influence on Western culture and politics—was hardly a liberal. Drawing from theology, feminist theory, and political philosophy, Eric Gregory offers here a liberal ethics of citizenship, one less susceptible to anti-liberal critics because it is informed by the Augustinian tradition. The result is a book that expands Augustinian imaginations for liberalism and liberal imaginations for Augustinianism. Gregory examines a broad range of Augustine’s texts and their reception in different disciplines and identifies two classical themes (...)
     
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  18. R. L. Gregory (ed.) (1998). The Oxford Companion to the Mind. Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Companion to the Mind is a classic. Published in 1987, to huge acclaim, it immediately took its place as the indispensable guide to the mysteries - and idiosyncracies - of the human mind. In no other book can the reader find discussions of concepts such as language, memory, and intelligence, side by side with witty definitions of common human experiences such as the 'cocktail-party' and 'halo' effects, and the least effort principle. Richard Gregory again brings his wit, (...)
     
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  19. Robert H. Kane, Reflections on Free Will, Determinism, and Indeterminism.
    _Some say there is no progress in philosophy, and certainly there is one sense in_ _which they are wrong. There are at least significant developments in philosophical_ _doctrines that have been persistently advocated in the past. With confidence I leave_ _you to arrive at a satisfactory understanding of 'significant'. There is no doubt that_ _Robert Kane has made some progress, probably more than any other contemporary_ _philosopher, in the laying out and defending of the doctrine that an understandable_ _freedom (...)
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  20.  26
    Dominic Gregory (2013). Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents. Oxford University Press.
    Certain representations are bound in a special way to our sensory capacities. Many pictures show things as looking certain ways, for instance, while auditory mental images show things as sounding certain ways. What do all those distinctively sensory representations have in common, and what makes them different from representations of other kinds? Dominic Gregory argues that they are alike in having meanings of a certain special type. He employs a host of novel ideas relating to kinds of perceptual states, (...)
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  21.  26
    Robert Kane (2010). Ethics and the Quest for Wisdom. Cambridge University Press.
    Modernity has challenged the ancient ideal of a universal quest for wisdom, and today's world of conflicting cultures and values has raised further doubts regarding the possibility of objective ethical standards. Robert Kane refocuses the debate on the philosophical quest for wisdom, and argues that ethical principles about right action and the good life can be seen to emerge from that very quest itself. His book contends that the search for wisdom involves a persistent striving to overcome narrowness of (...)
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  22. Robert H. Kane (ed.) (2001). Free Will. Blackwell.
    Over the past three decades, I have been developing a distinctive view of free will motivated by a desire to reconcile a non-determinist view of free will with modern science as well as with recent developments in philosophy. A view of free will of the kind I defend did not exist in a developed form before the 1980s, but is now discussed in the philosophical literature as one of three chief options an incompatibilist or libertarian view of free will might (...)
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  23. Graham Cairns-Smith, Thomas W. Clark, Ravi Gomatam, Robert H. Kane, Nicholas Maxwell, J. J. C. Smart, Sean A. Spence & Henry P. Stapp (2005). Commentaries on David Hodgson's "a Plain Person's Free Will". Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):20-75.
    REMARKS ON EVOLUTION AND TIME-SCALES, Graham Cairns-Smith; HODGSON'S BLACK BOX, Thomas Clark; DO HODGSON'S PROPOSITIONS UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE FREE WILL?, Ravi Gomatam; WHAT SHOULD WE RETAIN FROM A PLAIN PERSON'S CONCEPT OF FREE WILL?, Gilberto Gomes; ISOLATING DISPARATE CHALLENGES TO HODGSON'S ACCOUNT OF FREE WILL, Liberty Jaswal; FREE AGENCY AND LAWS OF NATURE, Robert Kane; SCIENCE VERSUS REALIZATION OF VALUE, NOT DETERMINISM VERSUS CHOICE, Nicholas Maxwell; COMMENTS ON HODGSON, J.J.C. Smart; THE VIEW FROM WITHIN, Sean Spence; COMMENTARY ON HODGSON, Henry (...)
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  24.  53
    Paul Gregory (2008). Quine's Naturalism: Language, Theory, and the Knowing Subject. Continuum.
    W. V. Quine was the most important naturalistic philosopher of the twentieth century and a major impetus for the recent resurgence of the view that empirical science is our best avenue to knowledge. His views, however, have not been well understood. Critics charge that Quine’s naturalized epistemology is circular and that it cannot be normative. Yet, such criticisms stem from a cluster of fundamental traditional assumptions regarding language, theory, and the knowing subject – the very presuppositions that Quine is at (...)
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  25.  11
    Robert Kane (2015). On the Role of Indeterminism in Libertarian Free Will. Philosophical Explorations 19 (1):2-16.
    In a recent paper in this journal, “How should libertarians conceive of the location and role of indeterminism?” Christopher Evan Franklin critically examines my libertarian view of free will and attempts to improve upon it. He says that while Kane's influential [view] offers many important advances in the development of a defensible libertarian theory of free will and moral responsibility … [he made] “two crucial mistakes in formulating libertarianism” – one about the location of indeterminism, the other about its (...)
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  26.  18
    Robert Kane (1994). Through the Moral Maze: Searching for Absolute Values in a Pluralistic World. North Castle Books.
    "On the ... issue of our pluralistic age -- whether we can continue to believe in absolute value -- Robert Kane has written the most helpful discussion I know.
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  27.  8
    Robert Kane (2007). Free Will: New Directions for an Ancient Problem: A Reply to Allen and Rogers. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:291-302.
    Over the past three decades, I have been developing a distinctive view of free will motivated by a desire to reconcile a non-determinist view of free will with modern science as well as with recent developments in philosophy. A view of free will of the kind I defend did not exist in a developed form before the 1980s, but is now discussed in the philosophical literature as one of three chief options an incompatibilist or libertarian view of free will might (...)
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  28. John Gregory (1999). The Neoplatonists: A Reader. Routledge.
    The Neoplatonist philosophers who flourished between the third and sixth centuries AD had a profound influence on western philosophy, on both Christian and Islamic literature and the visual arts from the Renaissance to modern times. This extensively revised and updated second edition of Neoplatonists provides a valuable introduction to the thought of four central Neoplatonic philosophers, Plotinus, Porphyry, Proclus and Iamblichus. John Gregory presents new translations of a selection of key passages from Neoplatonist writings, an introduction that puts in (...)
     
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  29.  10
    Maughn Gregory (2010). New Research on Programs for Classroom Discussion. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 10:1-3.
    Gregory reports on a study by researchers from Ohio State and Pennsylvania State Universities that evaluated nine programs of classroom discussion. The programs were evaluated on their evidence of discourse features that have been shown in research literature to characterize quality discussions. Two programs, Philosophy for Children and Collaborative Reasoning, were found to provide the richest opportunities for individual and collective reasoning, due to the way teachers in these programs model and scaffold argumentation and cultivate a culture of dialogic (...)
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    Toni A. Gregory (2006). An Evolutionary Theory of Diversity: The Contributions of Grounded Theory and Grounded Action to Reconceptualizing and Reframing Diversity as a Complex Phenomenon. World Futures 62 (7):542 – 550.
    The author discusses the contributions of grounded theory and grounded action to the development of a new, and evolutionary, theoretical framework for understanding diversity as a complex phenomenon. She discusses the work of Thomas and Gregory as pioneers in expanding the conceptualization of diversity, arguing that this new understanding increases the potential for creative action in systems.
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  31.  3
    Maughn Rollins Gregory (2014). The Procedurally Directive Approach to Teaching Controversial Issues. Educational Theory 64 (6):627-648.
    Recent articles on teaching controversial topics in schools have employed Michael Hand's distinction between “directive teaching,” in which teachers attempt to persuade students of correct positions on topics that are not rationally controversial, and “nondirective teaching,” in which teachers avoid persuading students on topics that are rationally controversial. However, the four methods of directive teaching discussed in the literature — explicit directive teaching, “steering,” “soft-directive teaching,” and “school ethos endorsement” — make rational persuasion problematic, if not self-defeating. In this essay, (...)
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  32. Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young (2005). Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader. Sheed & Ward.
    Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James (...)
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  33. Mary Gregory (2006). Diderot and the Metamorphosis of Species. Routledge.
    In this study Dr. Gregory examines how Diderot borrowed from Lucretius, Buffon, Maupertuis, and probability theory, and combined ideas from these sources in an innovative fashion to hypothesize that species are mutable and that all life arose randomly from a single prototype.
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  34.  3
    Mary Gregory (2006). Diderot and the Metamorphosis of Species. Routledge.
    In this study Dr. Gregory examines how Diderot borrowed from Lucretius, Buffon, Maupertuis, and probability theory, and combined ideas from these sources in an innovative fashion to hypothesize that species are mutable and that all life arose randomly from a single prototype.
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  35. Mary Gregory (2016). Diderot and the Metamorphosis of Species. Routledge.
    In this study Dr. Gregory examines how Diderot borrowed from Lucretius, Buffon, Maupertuis, and probability theory, and combined ideas from these sources in an innovative fashion to hypothesize that species are mutable and that all life arose randomly from a single prototype.
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  36. Eric Gregory (2008). Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship. University of Chicago Press.
    Augustine—for all of his influence on Western culture and politics—was hardly a liberal. Drawing from theology, feminist theory, and political philosophy, Eric Gregory offers here a liberal ethics of citizenship, one less susceptible to anti-liberal critics because it is informed by the Augustinian tradition. The result is a book that expands Augustinian imaginations for liberalism and liberal imaginations for Augustinianism. Gregory examines a broad range of Augustine’s texts and their reception in different disciplines and identifies two classical themes (...)
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  37. Marshall Gregory (2009). Shaped by Stories: The Ethical Power of Narratives. University of Notre Dame Press.
    In his latest book, Marshall Gregory begins with the premise that our lives are saturated with stories, ranging from magazines, books, films, television, and blogs to the words spoken by politicians, pastors, and teachers. He then explores the ethical implication of this nearly universal human obsession with narratives. Through careful readings of Katherine Anne Porter's "The Grave," Thurber's "The Catbird Seat," as well as _David Copperfield_ and _Wuthering Heights_, Gregory asks the question: How do the stories we absorb (...)
     
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  38.  9
    John Gregory (ed.) (1991). The Neoplatonists. Kyle Cathie.
    John Gregory presents new translations of a selection of key passages from Neoplatonist writings, an introduction that puts in context the writings, and an..
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  39. Jean Kane (2010). Social Class, Gender and Exclusion From School. Routledge.
    Rising exclusion rates indicate the continuing marginalisation of many young people in education in the UK. Working-class boys, children living in poverty, and children with additional/special educational needs are among those experiencing a disproportionate rate of exclusion. This book traces the processes of exclusion and alienation from school and relates this to a changing social and economic context. Jean Kane argues that policy on schooling, including curricular reform, needs to be re-connected to the broad political pursuit of social justice, (...)
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  40. Richard L. Gregory (1988). Consciousness in Science and Philosophy: Conscience and Con-Science. In Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.), Consciousness in Contemporary Science. Oxford University Press
     
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  41.  35
    John Lemos (2011). Kane's Libertarian Theory and Luck: A Reply to Griffith. Philosophia 39 (2):357-367.
    In a recent article, Meghan Griffith (American Philosophical Quarterly 47:43–56, 2010) argues that agent-causal libertarian theories are immune to the problem of luck but that event-causal theories succumb to this problem. In making her case against the event-causal theories, she focuses on Robert Kane’s event-causal theory. I provide a brief account of the central elements of Kane’s theory and I explain Griffith’s critique of it. I argue that Griffith’s criticisms fail. In doing so, I note some important respects (...)
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  42. Alfred R. Mele (1999). Kane, Luck, and the Significance of Free Will. Philosophical Explorations 2 (2):96-104.
    This paper raises a pair of objections to the novel libertarian position advanced in Robert Kane's recent book, The Significance of Free Will.The first objection's target is a central element in Kane's intriguing response to what he calls the "Intelligibility" and "Existence" questions about free will. It is argued that this response is undermined by considerations of luck.The second objection is directed at a portion of Kane's answer to what he calls "The Significance Question" about free will: (...)
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  43. Robert F. Allen (2005). Free Will and Indeterminism: Robert Kane's Libertarianism. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:341-355.
    Drawing on Aristotle’s notion of “ultimate responsibility,” Robert Kane argues that to be exercising a free will an agent must have taken some character forming decisions for which there were no sufficient conditions or decisive reasons.1 That is, an agent whose will is free not only had the ability to develop other dispositions, but could have exercised that ability without being irrational. To say it again, a person has a free will just in case her character is the product (...)
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  44.  53
    James Cain (2014). The Kane-Widerker Objection to Frankfurt Examples. Philosophia 42 (4):949-957.
    I will argue that the Kane-Widerker objection to Frankfurt examples is much weaker than is generally recognized. The Kane-Widerker objection holds that proponents of Frankfurt examples beg the question against incompatibilist accounts of free and responsible action by constructing examples that tacitly assume a compatibilist account of moral responsibility; that is, they assume that one can have non-derivative responsibility for choices that were not undetermined prior to their occurrence. The notion of an event, E, being ‘undetermined prior to (...)
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  45.  98
    Roksana Alavi (2005). Robert Kane, Free Will, and Neuro-Indeterminism. Philo 8 (2):95-108.
    In this paper I argue that Robert Kane’s defense of event-causal libertarianism, as presented in Responsibility, Luck, and Chance: Reflections on Free Will and Indeterminism, fails because his event-causal reconstruction is incoherent. I focus on the notions of efforts and self-forming actions essential to his defense.
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  46.  2
    Yoni Van Den Eede (forthcoming). The Possible Grasp of Networked Realities: Disclosing Gregory Bateson’s Work for the Study of Technology. Human Studies:1-20.
    In a world that is becoming more ‘networked’ than ever, especially on the personal-everyday level—with for example digital media pervading our lives and the Internet of Things now being on the rise—we need to increasingly account for ‘networked realities’. But are we as human beings actually well-equipped enough, epistemologically speaking, to do so? Multiple approaches within the philosophy of technology suggest our usage of technologies to be in the first instance oriented towards efficiency and the achievement of goals. We thereby (...)
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  47.  34
    Daniel Moseley (forthcoming). Review of Robert Kane, "Ethics and the Quest for Wisdom.". [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    Kane's ambitious and bold book presents a sustained argument for an ethical theory that gives an account of right action and the good life. The general structure of the main argument is presented and specific points are critically discussed.
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  48.  14
    Claudia Baracchi (2013). The Syntax of Life: Gregory Bateson and the “Platonic View”. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):204-219.
    The essay follows the fil rouge of ancient Greek thinking in the work of Gregory Bateson, an unusually multi-faceted and energetically nomadic intellect in the landscape of twentieth-century hyper-specialized disciplines, whose eclectic research focused on the question of life and of human participation in a living world. Through the reverberation of Neoplatonic motifs and echoing pre-Socratic intuitions, Bateson reflects on the “pattern which connects”—the λόγος that says one and all things, and the interpenetration of one and all things, thus (...)
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  49.  9
    Giovanni Maio (1999). Is Etiquette Relevant to Medical Ethics? Ethics and Aesthetics in the Works of John Gregory (1724–1773). Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):181-187.
    The writings of the Scottish physician and philosopher John Gregory play an important role in the modern codification of medical ethics. It is therefore appropriate to use his work as a historical example in approaching the question how elements of aesthetics were incorporated in 18th century medical ethics. The concept of a Gentleman is pivotal to the entire medical ethics of John Gregory as it provides him with the ethical source of the duty to patients. Gregory makes (...)
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  50.  9
    Kenneth Kunen & Dilip Raghavan (2009). Gregory Trees, the Continuum, and Martin's Axiom. Journal of Symbolic Logic 74 (2):712-720.
    We continue the investigation of Gregory trees and the Cantor Tree Property carried out by Hart and Kunen. We produce models of MA with the Continuum arbitrarily large in which there are Gregory trees, and in which there are no Gregory trees.
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