Search results for 'Gregory Kane' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John D. Engel, Gregory Kane, Deborah L. Jones, Debra Lynn-McHale, Martha Swartz, Paul Durbin & Don Klingen (1997). The Patient Self-Determination Act and Advance Directives: Snapshots of Activities in a Tertiary Health Care Center. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 18 (3):193-208.score: 240.0
    This study describes the results of a retrospective review of patients' charts who had an advanced directive (AD) and who were hospitalized in a tertiary, acute care teaching hospital. The purpose of the review was to understand from clinical, sociological, ethical and legal perspectives the nature and utility of ADs. Findings and implications of the review are discussed in terms of: patient demographics; diagnoses; quality of ADs; influence of ADs on clinical decisions; and legal aspects of ADs.
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  2. Gregory C. Kane (1996). Suicide and Advance Directives: One Doctor's Dilemma. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 17 (3):191-193.score: 240.0
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  3. Stewart Goetz & Robert Kane (2000). Excerpts From Robert Kane's Discussion with Members of the Audience. Journal of Ethics 4 (4):343 - 347.score: 180.0
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  4. James A. Weisheipl & William Humbert Kane, The Dignity of Science; Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Presented to William Humbert Kane. Edited, with Introd. By James A. Weisheipl in Collaboration with the Thomist and the Albertus Magnus Lyceum. Pref. By Michael Browne. [REVIEW]score: 180.0
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  5. Richard Gregory (forthcoming). An Interview with Richard Gregory. Cogito.score: 180.0
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  6. P. F. Kane (1996). Agriculture Liming Materials En Kane PF (Ed.) Official Methods of Analysis of Association of Official Analytical Chemist (AOAC). Method 955:938-945.score: 180.0
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  7. Baruch Spinoza, S. Shirley & Brad Gregory (1989). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition (1925). Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory. Brill.score: 180.0
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  8. Robert H. Kane, Reflections on Free Will, Determinism, and Indeterminism.score: 60.0
    _Some say there is no progress in philosophy, and certainly there is one sense in_ _which they are wrong. There are at least significant developments in philosophical_ _doctrines that have been persistently advocated in the past. With confidence I leave_ _you to arrive at a satisfactory understanding of 'significant'. There is no doubt that_ _Robert Kane has made some progress, probably more than any other contemporary_ _philosopher, in the laying out and defending of the doctrine that an understandable_ _freedom (...)
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  9. Robert H. Kane (ed.) (2001). Free Will. Blackwell.score: 60.0
    Over the past three decades, I have been developing a distinctive view of free will motivated by a desire to reconcile a non-determinist (incompatibilistor libertarian) view of free will with modern science as well as with recent developments in philosophy. A view of free will of the kind I defend (called a “causalindeterminist” or “event-causal” view in the current literature) did not exist in a developed form before the 1980s, but is now discussed in the philosophical literature as one of (...)
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  10. Graham Cairns-Smith, Thomas W. Clark, Ravi Gomatam, Robert H. Kane, Nicholas Maxwell, J. J. C. Smart, Sean A. Spence & Henry P. Stapp (2005). Commentaries on David Hodgson's "a Plain Person's Free Will&Quot;. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):20-75.score: 60.0
    REMARKS ON EVOLUTION AND TIME-SCALES, Graham Cairns-Smith; HODGSON'S BLACK BOX, Thomas Clark; DO HODGSON'S PROPOSITIONS UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE FREE WILL?, Ravi Gomatam; WHAT SHOULD WE RETAIN FROM A PLAIN PERSON'S CONCEPT OF FREE WILL?, Gilberto Gomes; ISOLATING DISPARATE CHALLENGES TO HODGSON'S ACCOUNT OF FREE WILL, Liberty Jaswal; FREE AGENCY AND LAWS OF NATURE, Robert Kane; SCIENCE VERSUS REALIZATION OF VALUE, NOT DETERMINISM VERSUS CHOICE, Nicholas Maxwell; COMMENTS ON HODGSON, J.J.C. Smart; THE VIEW FROM WITHIN, Sean Spence; COMMENTARY ON HODGSON, Henry (...)
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  11. Robert H. Kane (1996). The Significance of Free Will. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In the past quarter-century, there has been a resurgence of interest in philosophical questions about free will. After a clear and broad-reaching survey of these recent debates, Robert Kane presents his own controversial view. Arguing persuasively for a traditional incompatibilist or libertarian conception of free will, Kane demonstrates that such a conception can be made intelligible without appeals to obscure or mysterious forms of agency and thus can be reconconciled with a contemporary scientific picture of the world.
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  12. Paul Gregory, Quine's Naturalism:.score: 60.0
    W. V. Quine was the most important naturalistic philosopher of the twentieth century and a major impetus for the recent resurgence of the view that empirical science is our best avenue to knowledge. His views, however, have not been well understood. Critics charge that Quine’s naturalized epistemology is circular and that it cannot be normative. Yet, such criticisms stem from a cluster of fundamental traditional assumptions regarding language, theory, and the knowing subject – the very presuppositions that Quine is at (...)
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  13. Robert Kane (2010). Ethics and the Quest for Wisdom. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Modernity has challenged the ancient ideal of a universal quest for wisdom, and today's world of conflicting cultures and values has raised further doubts regarding the possibility of objective ethical standards. Robert Kane refocuses the debate on the philosophical quest for wisdom, and argues that ethical principles about right action and the good life can be seen to emerge from that very quest itself. His book contends that the search for wisdom involves a persistent striving to overcome narrowness of (...)
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  14. Dominic Gregory (2013). Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Certain representations are bound in a special way to our sensory capacities. Many pictures show things as looking certain ways, for instance, while auditory mental images show things as sounding certain ways. What do all those distinctively sensory representations have in common, and what makes them different from representations of other kinds? Dominic Gregory argues that they are alike in having meanings of a certain special type. He employs a host of novel ideas relating to kinds of perceptual states, (...)
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  15. Toni A. Gregory (2006). An Evolutionary Theory of Diversity: The Contributions of Grounded Theory and Grounded Action to Reconceptualizing and Reframing Diversity as a Complex Phenomenon. World Futures 62 (7):542 – 550.score: 60.0
    The author discusses the contributions of grounded theory and grounded action to the development of a new, and evolutionary, theoretical framework for understanding diversity as a complex phenomenon. She discusses the work of Thomas and Gregory as pioneers in expanding the conceptualization of diversity, arguing that this new understanding increases the potential for creative action in systems.
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  16. Robert Kane (1994/1996). Through the Moral Maze: Searching for Absolute Values in a Pluralistic World. North Castle Books.score: 60.0
    "On the ... issue of our pluralistic age -- whether we can continue to believe in absolute value -- Robert Kane has written the most helpful discussion I know.
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  17. John Gregory (ed.) (1991). The Neoplatonists. Kyle Cathie.score: 60.0
    John Gregory presents new translations of a selection of key passages from Neoplatonist writings, an introduction that puts in context the writings, and an ...
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  18. Maughn Gregory (2010). New Research on Programs for Classroom Discussion. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 10:1-3.score: 60.0
    Gregory explains nine educational approaches to discussing Philosophy with children. A general overview through analytical and critical reasoning explains the faults with Philosophy in an education setting and the authors feedback.
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  19. Mary Gregory (2006). Diderot and the Metamorphosis of Species. Routledge.score: 60.0
    In this study Dr. Gregory examines how Diderot borrowed from Lucretius, Buffon, Maupertuis, and probability theory, and combined ideas from these sources in an innovative fashion to hypothesize that species are mutable and that all life arose randomly from a single prototype.
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  20. R. L. Gregory (ed.) (2004/1998). The Oxford Companion to the Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The Oxford Companion to the Mind is a classic. Published in 1987, to huge acclaim, it immediately took its place as the indispensable guide to the mysteries - and idiosyncracies - of the human mind. In no other book can the reader find discussions of concepts such as language, memory, and intelligence, side by side with witty definitions of common human experiences such as the 'cocktail-party' and 'halo' effects, and the least effort principle. Richard Gregory again brings his wit, (...)
     
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  21. John Gregory (1999). The Neoplatonists: A Reader. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The Neoplatonist philosophers who flourished between the third and sixth centuries AD had a profound influence on western philosophy, on both Christian and Islamic literature and the visual arts from the Renaissance to modern times. This extensively revised and updated second edition of Neoplatonists provides a valuable introduction to the thought of four central Neoplatonic philosophers, Plotinus, Porphyry, Proclus and Iamblichus. John Gregory presents new translations of a selection of key passages from Neoplatonist writings, an introduction that puts in (...)
     
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  22. Robert H. Kane (2002). Free Will, Determinism, and Indeterminism. In Harald Atmanspacher & Robert C. Bishop (eds.), Between Chance and Choice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Determinism. Thorverton UK: Imprint Academic. 371--406.score: 30.0
  23. Robert H. Kane (1999). Responsibility, Luck, and Chance: Reflections on Free Will and Determinism. Journal of Philosophy 96 (5):217-40.score: 30.0
    Consider the following principle: (LP) If an action is undetermined at a time t, then its happening rather than not happening at t would be a matter of chance or luck, and so it could not be a free and responsible action. This principle (which we may call the luck principle, or simply LP) is false, as I shall explain shortly. Yet it seems true.
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  24. Robert Kane (2000). Free Will and Responsibility: Ancient Dispute, New Themes. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 4 (4):313-417.score: 30.0
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  25. Robert H. Kane (ed.) (2002). The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This comprehensive reference provides an exhaustive guide to current scholarship on the perennial problem of Free Will--perhaps the most hotly and voluminously debated of all philosophical problems. While reference is made throughout to the contributions of major thinkers of the past, the emphasis is on recent research. The essays, most of which are previously unpublished, combine the work of established scholars with younger thinkers who are beginning to make significant contributions. Taken as a whole, the Handbook provides an engaging and (...)
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  26. Robert H. Kane (1989). Two Kinds of Incompatibilism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (December):219-54.score: 30.0
    The present essay is about this problem of the intelligibility of incompatibilist freedom. I do not think Kant, Nagel and Strawson are right in thinking that incompatibilist theories cannot be made intelligible to theoretical reason, nor are those many others right who think that incompatibilist accounts of freedom must be essentially mysterious or terminally obscure. I doubt if I can say enough in one short paper to convince anyone of these claims who is not already persuaded. But I hope to (...)
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  27. Robert H. Kane (2002). Introduction: The Contours of Contemporary Free Will Debates. In , The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. New York: Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  28. Richard L. Gregory (1996). What Do Qualia Do? Perception 25:377-79.score: 30.0
  29. Robert H. Kane (2006). Libertarian Accounts of Free Will. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (457):136-142.score: 30.0
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  30. Robert H. Kane (1999). On Free Will, Responsibility and Indeterminism: Responses to Clarke, Haji, and Mele. Philosophical Explorations 2 (2):105-121.score: 30.0
    This paper responds to three critical essays on my book, The Significance of Free Will(Oxford, 1996) by Randolph Clarke, Istiyaque Haji and Alfred Mele (which essays appear in this issue and an earlier issue of this journal). This response first explains crucial features of the theory of free will of the book, including the notion of ultimate responsibility.The paper then answers objections of Haji and Mele that the occurrence of undetermined choices would be matters of luck or chance, and so (...)
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  31. Richard L. Gregory (1974). Perceptions as Hypotheses. In Philosophy Of Psychology. London,: Macmillan.score: 30.0
  32. Dominic Gregory (2006). Functionalism About Possible Worlds. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (1):95 – 115.score: 30.0
    Various writers have proposed that the notion of a possible world is a functional concept, yet very little has been done to develop that proposal. This paper explores a particular functionalist account of possible worlds, according to which pluralities of possible worlds are the bases for structures which provide occupants for the roles which analyse our ordinary modal concepts. It argues that the resulting position meets some of the stringent constraints which philosophers have placed upon accounts of possible worlds, while (...)
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  33. Robert H. Kane (2000). The Dual Regress of Free Will and the Role of Alternative Possibilities. Philosopical Perspectives 14 (s14):57-80.score: 30.0
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  34. Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Richard L. Gregory (1991). Perceptual Filling in of Artificially Induced Scotomas in Human Vision. Nature 350:699-702.score: 30.0
  35. Brad S. Gregory (1999). Is Small Beautiful? Microhistory and the History of Everyday Life. History and Theory 38 (1):100–110.score: 30.0
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  36. Robert H. Kane (1994). Free Will: The Elusive Ideal. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 75 (1-2):25-60.score: 30.0
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  37. Robert H. Kane (1985). Free Will and Values. SUNY Press.score: 30.0
    This book is about free will and the relativity of values, two topics that seem to have little in common beyond the fact that both have been the subject of ...
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  38. Robert H. Kane (2000). Responses to Bernard Berofsky, John Martin Fischer and Galen Strawson. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):157-167.score: 30.0
  39. Robert H. Kane, Symposium: The Psychology of Free Will. Commentary.score: 30.0
    These three papers are exceptionally rich and varied and I will be selective in responding. My aim is to relate the psychological research they discuss to the broader context of current philosophical debates about free will.
     
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  40. R. Kane (1996). Review. The Dilemma of Freedom and Foreknowledge. Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski. Mind 105 (419):518-519.score: 30.0
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  41. Anne Kane (1991). Cultural Analysis in Historical Sociology: The Analytic and Concrete Forms of the Autonomy of Culture. Sociological Theory 9 (1):53-69.score: 30.0
    In an effort to clear away confusions regarding the role of cultural analysis in historical explanation, this paper proposes a new approach to the issue of cultural autonomy. The premise is that there are two forms of cultural autonomy, analytic and concrete. Analytic autonomy posits the independent structure of culture-its elements, processes, and reproduction. It is achieved through the theoretical and artificial separation of culture from other social structures, conditions, and action. Concrete autonomy establishes the interconnection of culture with the (...)
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  42. Dominic Gregory (2001). Completeness and Decidability Results for Some Propositional Modal Logics Containing “Actually” Operators. Journal of Philosophical Logic 30 (1):57-78.score: 30.0
    The addition of "actually" operators to modal languages allows us to capture important inferential behaviours which cannot be adequately captured in logics formulated in simpler languages. Previous work on modal logics containing "actually" operators has concentrated entirely upon extensions of KT5 and has employed a particular modeltheoretic treatment of them. This paper proves completeness and decidability results for a range of normal and nonnormal but quasi-normal propositional modal logics containing "actually" operators, the weakest of which are conservative extensions of K, (...)
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  43. R. H. Kane (1972). Presupposition and Entailment. Mind 81 (323):401-404.score: 30.0
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  44. Robert H. Kane (1966). Turing Machines and Mental Reports. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 44 (December):344-52.score: 30.0
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  45. Anne E. Kane (1997). Theorizing Meaning Construction in Social Movements: Symbolic Structures and Interpretation During the Irish Land War, 1879-1882. Sociological Theory 15 (3):249-276.score: 30.0
    Though the process of meaning construction is widely recognized to be a crucial factor in the mobilization, unfolding, and outcomes of social movements, the conditions and mechanisms that allow meaning construction and cultural transformation are often misconceptualized and/or underanalyzed. Following a "tool kit" perspective on culture, dominant social movement theory locates meaning only as it is embodied in concrete social practices. Meaning construction from this perspective is a matter of manipulating static symbols and meaning to achieve goals. I argue instead (...)
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  46. Robert H. Kane (1988). Libertarianism and Rationality Revisited. Southern Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):441-60.score: 30.0
  47. R. Kane (1984). The Modal Ontological Argument. Mind 93 (371):336-350.score: 30.0
    The structure of the second, Or so-Called modal version of anselm's ontological argument is discussed in relation to various systems of alethic modal logic. It is argued that there are three current problems standing in the way of acceptance of the argument, Each related to its modal structure, And each an analogue of a traditional objection to anselm's original argument. Two of these problems can probably be solved, But the third remains recalcitrant.
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  48. John Kane (1996). Justice, Impartiality, and Equality: Why the Concept of Justice Does Not Presume Equality. Political Theory 24 (3):375-393.score: 30.0
  49. Richard L. Gregory (1996). Peculiar Qualia. Perception 25 (7):755-756.score: 30.0
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  50. Brad S. Gregory (2006). The Other Confessional History: On Secular Bias in the Study of Religion. History and Theory 45 (4):132–149.score: 30.0
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