Search results for 'Gregory Luke Larkin' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Gregory Luke Larkin (2008). Deadly Sins and Cardinal Virtues in the Clinical Management of Intimate Partner Violence. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (4):334-345.
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    Gregory Luke Larkin, James E. Weber & Arthur R. Derse (1999). Universal Emergency Access Under Managed Care: Universal Doubt or Mission Impossible? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (2):213-225.
    Appropriate concerns about cost and unequal access to healthcare have resulted in the creation of powerful managed networks seeking to share the risks of high healthcare costs among plans, providers, and patients. Much to their credit, these managed networks have slowed the rise in healthcare spending by as much as 44% in markets with high HMO penetration. However, whether these savings will materially improve access and quality remains to be seen.
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  3.  7
    Roderick S. Hooker & Gregory L. Larkin (2010). Patient Willingness to Be Seen by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Residents in the Emergency Department: Does the Presumption of Assent Have an Empirical Basis? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):1-10.
    Physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and medical residents constitute an increasingly significant part of the American health care workforce, yet patient assent to be seen by nonphysicians is only presumed and seldom sought. In order to assess the willingness of patients to receive medical care provided by nonphysicians, we administered provider preference surveys to a random sample of patients attending three emergency departments (EDs). Concurrently, a survey was sent to a random selection of ED residents and PAs. All respondents (...)
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  4.  32
    Mariale Hardiman, Luke Rinne, Emma Gregory & Julia Yarmolinskaya (2012). Neuroethics, Neuroeducation, and Classroom Teaching: Where the Brain Sciences Meet Pedagogy. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (2):135-143.
    The popularization of neuroscientific ideas about learning—sometimes legitimate, sometimes merely commercial—poses a real challenge for classroom teachers who want to understand how children learn. Until teacher preparation programs are reconceived to incorporate relevant research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences, teachers need translation and guidance to effectively use information about the brain and cognition. Absent such guidance, teachers, schools, and school districts may waste time and money pursuing so called brain-based interventions that lack a firm basis in research. Meanwhile, the (...)
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  5.  12
    Roderick S. Hooker & Gregory L. Larkin (2010). Patient Willingness to Be Seen by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Residents in the Emergency Department: Does the Presumption of Assent Have an Empirical Basis? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):1-10.
    Physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and medical residents constitute an increasingly significant part of the American health care workforce, yet patient assent to be seen by nonphysicians is only presumed and seldom sought. In order to assess the willingness of patients to receive medical care provided by nonphysicians, we administered provider preference surveys to a random sample of patients attending three emergency departments (EDs). Concurrently, a survey was sent to a random selection of ED residents and PAs. All respondents (...)
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  6. John Gregory & Laurence B. Mccullough (1998). John Gregory's Writings on Medical Ethics and Philosophy of Medicine.
     
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  7.  6
    Gregory L. Larkin (2003). Mapping, Modeling, and Mentoring: Charting a Course for Professionalism in Graduate Medical Education. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (2):167-177.
    Professionalism, like common sense, remains a timeless ingredient in the ethically successful practice of medicine in the twenty-first century. Professional ideals are particularly relevant in times of economic and social upheaval, medicolegal crises, provider shortages, and global threats to the public health. The American Board of Internal Medicine specifies professionalism as “constituting those attitudes and behaviors that serve to maintain patient interest above physician self-interest.” Because of its transcendent nature, professionalism, like ethics, is also considered “a structurally stabilizing, morally protective (...)
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  8. Roy C. Strong & William Larkin (1995). William Larkin Icons of Splendor. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  9.  5
    Charles O. Gregory (1947). Labor and the Law:Labor and the Law. Charles O. Gregory. Ethics 57 (3):206-.
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  10. R. L. Gregory (1981). Mind in Science a History of Explanations in Psychology and Physics /Richard L. Gregory. --. --. Cambridge University Press,1981.
     
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  11. Baruch Spinoza, S. Shirley & Brad Gregory (1989). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition . Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory. Brill.
    This new and complete translation of Spinoza's famous 17th-century work fills an important gap, not only for all scholars of Spinoza, but also for everyone interested in the relationship between Western philosophy and religion, and the history of biblical exegesis.
     
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  12. Baruch Spinoza, Brad Gregory & Shirley (1991). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition . Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory. Brill.
    This new and complete translation of Spinoza's famous 17th-century work fills an important gap, not only for all scholars of Spinoza, but also for everyone interested in the relationship between Western philosophy and religion, and the history of biblical exegesis.
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  13. Baruch Spinoza, Brad Gregory & Shirley (1989). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition . Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory. Brill.
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  14. R. L. Gregory (ed.) (2004/1998). The Oxford Companion to the Mind. Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Companion to the Mind is a classic. Published in 1987, to huge acclaim, it immediately took its place as the indispensable guide to the mysteries - and idiosyncracies - of the human mind. In no other book can the reader find discussions of concepts such as language, memory, and intelligence, side by side with witty definitions of common human experiences such as the 'cocktail-party' and 'halo' effects, and the least effort principle. Richard Gregory again brings his wit, (...)
     
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  15. Eric Gregory (2010). Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship. University of Chicago Press.
    Augustine—for all of his influence on Western culture and politics—was hardly a liberal. Drawing from theology, feminist theory, and political philosophy, Eric Gregory offers here a liberal ethics of citizenship, one less susceptible to anti-liberal critics because it is informed by the Augustinian tradition. The result is a book that expands Augustinian imaginations for liberalism and liberal imaginations for Augustinianism. Gregory examines a broad range of Augustine’s texts and their reception in different disciplines and identifies two classical themes (...)
     
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  16.  23
    Dominic Gregory (2013). Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents. Oxford University Press.
    Certain representations are bound in a special way to our sensory capacities. Many pictures show things as looking certain ways, for instance, while auditory mental images show things as sounding certain ways. What do all those distinctively sensory representations have in common, and what makes them different from representations of other kinds? Dominic Gregory argues that they are alike in having meanings of a certain special type. He employs a host of novel ideas relating to kinds (...)
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  17.  50
    Paul Gregory (2008). Quine's Naturalism: Language, Theory, and the Knowing Subject. Continuum.
    W. V. Quine was the most important naturalistic philosopher of the twentieth century and a major impetus for the recent resurgence of the view that empirical science is our best avenue to knowledge. His views, however, have not been well understood. Critics charge that Quine’s naturalized epistemology is circular and that it cannot be normative. Yet, such criticisms stem from a cluster of fundamental traditional assumptions regarding language, theory, and the knowing subject – the very presuppositions that Quine is at (...)
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  18. John Gregory (1999). The Neoplatonists: A Reader. Routledge.
    The Neoplatonist philosophers who flourished between the third and sixth centuries AD had a profound influence on western philosophy, on both Christian and Islamic literature and the visual arts from the Renaissance to modern times. This extensively revised and updated second edition of Neoplatonists provides a valuable introduction to the thought of four central Neoplatonic philosophers, Plotinus, Porphyry, Proclus and Iamblichus. John Gregory presents new translations of a selection of key passages from Neoplatonist writings, an introduction that puts in (...)
     
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  19.  8
    Maughn Gregory (2010). New Research on Programs for Classroom Discussion. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 10:1-3.
    Gregory explains nine educational approaches to discussing Philosophy with children. A general overview through analytical and critical reasoning explains the faults with Philosophy in an education setting and the authors feedback.
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  20.  1
    Maughn Rollins Gregory (2014). The Procedurally Directive Approach to Teaching Controversial Issues. Educational Theory 64 (6):627-648.
    Recent articles on teaching controversial topics in schools have employed Michael Hand's distinction between “directive teaching,” in which teachers attempt to persuade students of correct positions on topics that are not rationally controversial, and “nondirective teaching,” in which teachers avoid persuading students on topics that are rationally controversial. However, the four methods of directive teaching discussed in the literature — explicit directive teaching, “steering,” “soft-directive teaching,” and “school ethos endorsement” — make rational persuasion problematic, if not self-defeating. In this essay, (...)
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  21.  20
    Toni A. Gregory (2006). An Evolutionary Theory of Diversity: The Contributions of Grounded Theory and Grounded Action to Reconceptualizing and Reframing Diversity as a Complex Phenomenon. World Futures 62 (7):542 – 550.
    The author discusses the contributions of grounded theory and grounded action to the development of a new, and evolutionary, theoretical framework for understanding diversity as a complex phenomenon. She discusses the work of Thomas and Gregory as pioneers in expanding the conceptualization of diversity, arguing that this new understanding increases the potential for creative action in systems.
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  22. Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young (2005). Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader. Sheed & Ward.
    Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James (...)
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  23.  3
    Mary Gregory (2006). Diderot and the Metamorphosis of Species. Routledge.
    In this study Dr. Gregory examines how Diderot borrowed from Lucretius, Buffon, Maupertuis, and probability theory, and combined ideas from these sources in an innovative fashion to hypothesize that species are mutable and that all life arose randomly from a single prototype.
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  24. Mary Gregory (2016). Diderot and the Metamorphosis of Species. Routledge.
    In this study Dr. Gregory examines how Diderot borrowed from Lucretius, Buffon, Maupertuis, and probability theory, and combined ideas from these sources in an innovative fashion to hypothesize that species are mutable and that all life arose randomly from a single prototype.
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  25. Eric Gregory (2008). Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship. University of Chicago Press.
    Augustine—for all of his influence on Western culture and politics—was hardly a liberal. Drawing from theology, feminist theory, and political philosophy, Eric Gregory offers here a liberal ethics of citizenship, one less susceptible to anti-liberal critics because it is informed by the Augustinian tradition. The result is a book that expands Augustinian imaginations for liberalism and liberal imaginations for Augustinianism. Gregory examines a broad range of Augustine’s texts and their reception in different disciplines and identifies two classical themes (...)
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  26. Marshall Gregory (2009). Shaped by Stories: The Ethical Power of Narratives. University of Notre Dame Press.
    In his latest book, Marshall Gregory begins with the premise that our lives are saturated with stories, ranging from magazines, books, films, television, and blogs to the words spoken by politicians, pastors, and teachers. He then explores the ethical implication of this nearly universal human obsession with narratives. Through careful readings of Katherine Anne Porter's "The Grave," Thurber's "The Catbird Seat," as well as _David Copperfield_ and _Wuthering Heights_, Gregory asks the question: How do the stories we absorb (...)
     
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  27.  9
    John Gregory (ed.) (1991). The Neoplatonists. Kyle Cathie.
    John Gregory presents new translations of a selection of key passages from Neoplatonist writings, an introduction that puts in context the writings, and an..
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  28. Carmen Luke (2001). Globalization and Women in Academia: North/West-South/East. Routledge.
    In this cross-cultural exploration of the comparative experiences of Asian and Western women in higher education management, leading feminist theorist Carmen Luke constructs a provocative framework that situates her own standpoint and experiences alongside those of Asian women she studied over a three-year period. She conveys some of the complexity of global sweeps and trends in education and feminist discourse as they intersect with local cultural variations but also dovetail into patterns of regional similarities. Western feminist research has established (...)
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  29.  40
    Gregory R. Perry (forthcoming). Book Review: The Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles. [REVIEW] Interpretation 64 (3):318-318.
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  30. Richard L. Gregory (1981). Mind In Science: A History Of Explanations In Psychology And Physics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  31. Richard L. Gregory (1974). Perceptions as Hypotheses. In Philosophy Of Psychology. London,: Macmillan
  32.  92
    Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Richard L. Gregory (1991). Perceptual Filling in of Artificially Induced Scotomas in Human Vision. Nature 350:699-702.
  33. Richard L. Gregory (1996). What Do Qualia Do? Perception 25:377-79.
  34. William S. Larkin (2004). Persons, Animals, and Bodies. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):95-116.
    The philosophical problem of personal identity starts with something like Descartes’ famous question—“But what then am I?”—construed as an inquiry into the most fundamental nature of creatures like us. Let us stipulate that creatures like us are most fundamentally persons. That is, ‘person’ is the name of our..
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  35.  36
    William S. Larkin (1999). Shoemaker on Moore's Paradox and Self-Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 96 (3):239-52.
    Shoemaker argues that a satisfactory resolution of Moore's paradox requires a _self-intimation thesis that posits a "constitutive relation between belief and believing that one believes." He claims that such a thesis is needed to explain the crucial fact that the assent conditions for '_P' entail those for '_I believe that P'. This paper argues for an alternative resolution of Moore's paradox that provides for an adequate explanation of the crucial fact without relying on the kind of necessary connection between first (...)
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  36.  59
    William S. Larkin, A Broad Perceptual Model of Privileged Introspective Judgments.
  37.  48
    Joshua C. Gregory (1923). Some Theories of Laughter. Mind 32 (127):328-344.
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  38.  49
    William S. Larkin (2000). Content Skepticism. Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):33-43.
    Skeptical theses in general claim that we cannot know what we think we know. Content skepticism in particular claims that we cannot know the contents of our own occurrent thoughtsat least not in the way we think we can. I argue that an externalist account of content does engender a mild form of content skepticism but that the condition is no real cause for concern. Content externalism forces us to reevaluate some of our assumptions about introspective knowledge, but it is (...)
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  39.  33
    William S. Larkin, Concepts and Introspection: An Externalist Defense of Inner Sense.
  40.  26
    William S. Larkin, Content Skepticism and Reliable Self-Knowledge.
    Sub-Thesis 1: We should be contingent reliabilists to avoid the threat of an unacceptably strong content skeptical thesis posed by content externalism and the possibility of twin thoughts. The predominant strategy for resisting this threat has been to rely on the claim that introspective self-attributions are immune to brute error; but this claim is problematic from a naturalistic standpoint.
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  41.  24
    William S. Larkin (1999). Brute Error with Respect to Content. Philosophical Studies 94 (1-2):159-71.
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  42.  22
    Richard L. Gregory (1996). Peculiar Qualia. Perception 25 (7):755-756.
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  43.  20
    Joshua C. Gregory (1920). Do We Know Other Minds Mediately or Immediately? Mind 29 (116):446-457.
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  44.  19
    Joshua C. Gregory (1916). Dreams as Psychical Explosions. Mind 25 (98):193-205.
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  45.  19
    William S. Larkin, Twin Earth, Dry Earth, and Brains in Vats.
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  46.  16
    William S. Larkin, Content and Metacognition.
    C. Theses: 1. Content Externalism strictly implies the possibility of acquiring a new concept as the result of an unwitting switch of environments. 2. This intuitively compels us to accept the possibility of someone possessing a concept without being aware that she does. 3. This possibility strictly favors causal models of meta-cognition over constitution models. 4. The possibility of possessing a concept unawares suggests that the contents of metacognitive.
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  47.  13
    Joshua C. Gregory (1922). Some Tendencies of Opinion on Our Knowledge of Other Minds. Philosophical Review 31 (2):148-163.
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  48. Richard L. Gregory (1988). Consciousness in Science and Philosophy: Conscience and Con-Science. In Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.), Consciousness in Contemporary Science. Oxford University Press
     
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  49.  14
    William S. Larkin, Comments on Pryor's “Externalism About Content and McKinsey-Style Reasoning”.
    I. Pryor on McKinsey: " A. Pryor’s Version of McKinsey-style Reasoning 1. Given authoritative self-knowledge, I can usually tell the contents of my own thoughts just by introspection. So I can know the following claim on the basis of reflection alone: " McK-1: I am thinking a thought with the content _water puts out fires_.
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  50.  14
    Joshua C. Gregory (1921). A Comparison of Strong's Theory of Perception with Reid's. Philosophical Review 30 (4):352-366.
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