Search results for 'Gregory Luke Larkin' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gregory Luke Larkin, James E. Weber & Arthur R. Derse (1999). Universal Emergency Access Under Managed Care: Universal Doubt or Mission Impossible? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):213-225.score: 290.0
    Appropriate concerns about cost and unequal access to healthcare have resulted in the creation of powerful managed networks seeking to share the risks of high healthcare costs among plans, providers, and patients. Much to their credit, these managed networks have slowed the rise in healthcare spending by as much as 44% in markets with high HMO penetration. However, whether these savings will materially improve access and quality remains to be seen.
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  2. Gregory Luke Larkin (2008). Deadly Sins and Cardinal Virtues in the Clinical Management of Intimate Partner Violence. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (4):334-345.score: 290.0
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  3. Mariale Hardiman, Luke Rinne, Emma Gregory & Julia Yarmolinskaya (2012). Neuroethics, Neuroeducation, and Classroom Teaching: Where the Brain Sciences Meet Pedagogy. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (2):135-143.score: 120.0
    The popularization of neuroscientific ideas about learning—sometimes legitimate, sometimes merely commercial—poses a real challenge for classroom teachers who want to understand how children learn. Until teacher preparation programs are reconceived to incorporate relevant research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences, teachers need translation and guidance to effectively use information about the brain and cognition. Absent such guidance, teachers, schools, and school districts may waste time and money pursuing so called brain-based interventions that lack a firm basis in research. Meanwhile, the (...)
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  4. Roderick S. Hooker & Gregory L. Larkin (2010). Patient Willingness to Be Seen by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Residents in the Emergency Department: Does the Presumption of Assent Have an Empirical Basis? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):1-10.score: 120.0
    Physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and medical residents constitute an increasingly significant part of the American health care workforce, yet patient assent to be seen by nonphysicians is only presumed and seldom sought. In order to assess the willingness of patients to receive medical care provided by nonphysicians, we administered provider preference surveys to a random sample of patients attending three emergency departments (EDs). Concurrently, a survey was sent to a random selection of ED residents and PAs. All respondents (...)
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  5. Gregory L. Larkin (2003). Mapping, Modeling, and Mentoring: Charting a Course for Professionalism in Graduate Medical Education. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (02):167-177.score: 120.0
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  6. Richard Gregory (forthcoming). An Interview with Richard Gregory. Cogito.score: 120.0
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  7. Baruch Spinoza & Brad Gregory (1989). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition (1925). Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory. Brill.score: 120.0
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  8. Paul Gregory, Quine's Naturalism:.score: 60.0
    W. V. Quine was the most important naturalistic philosopher of the twentieth century and a major impetus for the recent resurgence of the view that empirical science is our best avenue to knowledge. His views, however, have not been well understood. Critics charge that Quine’s naturalized epistemology is circular and that it cannot be normative. Yet, such criticisms stem from a cluster of fundamental traditional assumptions regarding language, theory, and the knowing subject – the very presuppositions that Quine is at (...)
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  9. Toni A. Gregory (2006). An Evolutionary Theory of Diversity: The Contributions of Grounded Theory and Grounded Action to Reconceptualizing and Reframing Diversity as a Complex Phenomenon. World Futures 62 (7):542 – 550.score: 60.0
    The author discusses the contributions of grounded theory and grounded action to the development of a new, and evolutionary, theoretical framework for understanding diversity as a complex phenomenon. She discusses the work of Thomas and Gregory as pioneers in expanding the conceptualization of diversity, arguing that this new understanding increases the potential for creative action in systems.
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  10. Dominic Gregory (2013). Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Certain representations are bound in a special way to our sensory capacities. Many pictures show things as looking certain ways, for instance, while auditory mental images show things as sounding certain ways. What do all those distinctively sensory representations have in common, and what makes them different from representations of other kinds? Dominic Gregory argues that they are alike in having meanings of a certain special type. He employs a host of novel ideas relating to kinds of perceptual states, (...)
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  11. John Gregory (ed.) (1991). The Neoplatonists. Kyle Cathie.score: 60.0
    John Gregory presents new translations of a selection of key passages from Neoplatonist writings, an introduction that puts in context the writings, and an ...
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  12. R. L. Gregory (ed.) (2004/1998). The Oxford Companion to the Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The Oxford Companion to the Mind is a classic. Published in 1987, to huge acclaim, it immediately took its place as the indispensable guide to the mysteries - and idiosyncracies - of the human mind. In no other book can the reader find discussions of concepts such as language, memory, and intelligence, side by side with witty definitions of common human experiences such as the 'cocktail-party' and 'halo' effects, and the least effort principle. Richard Gregory again brings his wit, (...)
     
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  13. Mary Gregory (2006). Diderot and the Metamorphosis of Species. Routledge.score: 60.0
    In this study Dr. Gregory examines how Diderot borrowed from Lucretius, Buffon, Maupertuis, and probability theory, and combined ideas from these sources in an innovative fashion to hypothesize that species are mutable and that all life arose randomly from a single prototype.
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  14. Maughn Gregory (2010). New Research on Programs for Classroom Discussion. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 10:1-3.score: 60.0
    Gregory explains nine educational approaches to discussing Philosophy with children. A general overview through analytical and critical reasoning explains the faults with Philosophy in an education setting and the authors feedback.
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  15. John Gregory (1999). The Neoplatonists: A Reader. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The Neoplatonist philosophers who flourished between the third and sixth centuries AD had a profound influence on western philosophy, on both Christian and Islamic literature and the visual arts from the Renaissance to modern times. This extensively revised and updated second edition of Neoplatonists provides a valuable introduction to the thought of four central Neoplatonic philosophers, Plotinus, Porphyry, Proclus and Iamblichus. John Gregory presents new translations of a selection of key passages from Neoplatonist writings, an introduction that puts in (...)
     
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  16. Richard L. Gregory (1996). What Do Qualia Do? Perception 25:377-79.score: 30.0
  17. William S. Larkin (2004). Persons, Animals, and Bodies. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):95-116.score: 30.0
    The philosophical problem of personal identity starts with something like Descartes’ famous question—“But what then am I?”—construed as an inquiry into the most fundamental nature of creatures like us. Let us stipulate that creatures like us are most fundamentally persons. That is, ‘person’ is the name of our..
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  18. Richard L. Gregory (1974). Perceptions as Hypotheses. In Philosophy Of Psychology. London,: Macmillan.score: 30.0
  19. Dominic Gregory (2006). Functionalism About Possible Worlds. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (1):95 – 115.score: 30.0
    Various writers have proposed that the notion of a possible world is a functional concept, yet very little has been done to develop that proposal. This paper explores a particular functionalist account of possible worlds, according to which pluralities of possible worlds are the bases for structures which provide occupants for the roles which analyse our ordinary modal concepts. It argues that the resulting position meets some of the stringent constraints which philosophers have placed upon accounts of possible worlds, while (...)
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  20. Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Richard L. Gregory (1991). Perceptual Filling in of Artificially Induced Scotomas in Human Vision. Nature 350:699-702.score: 30.0
  21. Brad S. Gregory (1999). Is Small Beautiful? Microhistory and the History of Everyday Life. History and Theory 38 (1):100–110.score: 30.0
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  22. William S. Larkin (2000). Content Skepticism. Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):33-43.score: 30.0
    Skeptical theses in general claim that we cannot know what we think we know. Content skepticism in particular claims that we cannot know the contents of our own occurrent thoughtsat least not in the way we think we can. I argue that an externalist account of content does engender a mild form of content skepticism but that the condition is no real cause for concern. Content externalism forces us to reevaluate some of our assumptions about introspective knowledge, but it is (...)
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  23. William S. Larkin, Concepts and Introspection: An Externalist Defense of Inner Sense.score: 30.0
  24. William S. Larkin, A Broad Perceptual Model of Privileged Introspective Judgments.score: 30.0
  25. William S. Larkin (1999). Shoemaker on Moore's Paradox and Self-Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 96 (3):239-52.score: 30.0
    Shoemaker argues that a satisfactory resolution of Moore's paradox requires a _self-intimation thesis that posits a "constitutive relation between belief and believing that one believes." He claims that such a thesis is needed to explain the crucial fact that the assent conditions for '_P' entail those for '_I believe that P'. This paper argues for an alternative resolution of Moore's paradox that provides for an adequate explanation of the crucial fact without relying on the kind of necessary connection between first (...)
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  26. William S. Larkin, Content Skepticism and Reliable Self-Knowledge.score: 30.0
    Sub-Thesis 1: We should be contingent reliabilists to avoid the threat of an unacceptably strong content skeptical thesis posed by content externalism and the possibility of twin thoughts. The predominant strategy for resisting this threat has been to rely on the claim that introspective self-attributions are immune to brute error; but this claim is problematic from a naturalistic standpoint.
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  27. Joseph M. Larkin (2000). The Ability of Internal Auditors to Identify Ethical Dilemmas. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (4):401 - 409.score: 30.0
    This study surveys the internal audit department of a large financial services organization. Respondents were challenged to recognize and evaluate ethical and unethical situations often encountered in practice. Four key demographic variables were investigated: gender, age, years of employment and peer group influence. For the most part, respondents view themselves as more ethical than their peers. There does appear to be a gender effect suggesting females' ability to identify ethical behavior better than their male counterparts. This study contributes to the (...)
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  28. Richard L. Gregory (1996). Peculiar Qualia. Perception 25 (7):755-756.score: 30.0
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  29. Dominic Gregory (2001). The Worlds of Possibility: Modal Realism and the Semantics of Modal Logic. Charles S. Chihara. Mind 110 (439):736-740.score: 30.0
  30. Brad S. Gregory (2006). The Other Confessional History: On Secular Bias in the Study of Religion. History and Theory 45 (4):132–149.score: 30.0
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  31. Dominic Gregory (2001). Completeness and Decidability Results for Some Propositional Modal Logics Containing “Actually” Operators. Journal of Philosophical Logic 30 (1):57-78.score: 30.0
    The addition of "actually" operators to modal languages allows us to capture important inferential behaviours which cannot be adequately captured in logics formulated in simpler languages. Previous work on modal logics containing "actually" operators has concentrated entirely upon extensions of KT5 and has employed a particular modeltheoretic treatment of them. This paper proves completeness and decidability results for a range of normal and nonnormal but quasi-normal propositional modal logics containing "actually" operators, the weakest of which are conservative extensions of K, (...)
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  32. William S. Larkin (1999). Brute Error with Respect to Content. Philosophical Studies 94 (1-2):159-71.score: 30.0
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  33. William S. Larkin, Content and Metacognition.score: 30.0
    C. Theses: 1. Content Externalism strictly implies the possibility of acquiring a new concept as the result of an unwitting switch of environments. 2. This intuitively compels us to accept the possibility of someone possessing a concept without being aware that she does. 3. This possibility strictly favors causal models of meta-cognition over constitution models. 4. The possibility of possessing a concept unawares suggests that the contents of metacognitive.
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  34. Joshua C. Gregory (1954). Leibniz, the Identity of Indiscernibles, and Probability. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 14 (3):365-369.score: 30.0
  35. William S. Larkin, Twin Earth, Dry Earth, and Brains in Vats.score: 30.0
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  36. Joshua C. Gregory (1920). Do We Know Other Minds Mediately or Immediately? Mind 29 (116):446-457.score: 30.0
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  37. William S. Larkin, Burge on Our Privileged Access to the External World.score: 30.0
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  38. William S. Larkin, Comments on Pryor's “Externalism About Content and McKinsey-Style Reasoning”.score: 30.0
    I. Pryor on McKinsey:
    A. Pryor’s Version of McKinsey-style Reasoning
    1. Given authoritative self-knowledge, I can usually tell the contents of my own thoughts just by introspection.
    So
    I can know the following claim on the basis of reflection alone:
    McK-1: I am thinking a thought with the content _water puts out fires_.
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  39. Ann Gregory (1990). Are Women Different and Why Are Women Thought to Be Different? Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (4-5):257 - 266.score: 30.0
    The existing literature on gender differences and stereotyping is reviewed in this article. Three theoretical perspectives are discussed: person-centred, organization-centred, and gender context, followed by a review concerning both the findings of the research, a critique of the research methodologies used, and suggestions for future research. The article concludes by suggesting other areas in the field of women in management to which little if any attention has been drawn and recommending some research methodologies which would be applied.
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  40. John Gregory (1976). Higher Souslin Trees and the Generalized Continuum Hypothesis. Journal of Symbolic Logic 41 (3):663-671.score: 30.0
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  41. Dominic Gregory (2001). Smith on Truthmakers. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):422 – 427.score: 30.0
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  42. Joshua C. Gregory (1916). Dreams as Psychical Explosions. Mind 25 (98):193-205.score: 30.0
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  43. Joshua C. Gregory (1922). Three Witnesses Against Behaviourism. Philosophical Review 31 (6):581-592.score: 30.0
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  44. Richard L. Gregory (1984). Is Consciousness Sensational Inferences? Perception 13:641-6.score: 30.0
  45. Maughn Gregory (2001). The Perils of Rationality: Nietzsche, Peirce and Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 33 (1):23–34.score: 30.0
  46. Ian Gregory (1983). T. W. Moore on the Ethics of Discrimination. Journal of Philosophy of Education 17 (1):127–130.score: 30.0
  47. Joshua C. Gregory (1922). Visual Images, Words and Dreams. Mind 31 (123):321-334.score: 30.0
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  48. Joshua C. Gregory (1921). A Comparison of Strong's Theory of Perception with Reid's. Philosophical Review 30 (4):352-366.score: 30.0
  49. I. M. M. Gregory & R. G. Woods (1970). Indoctrination. Journal of Philosophy of Education 4 (1):77–105.score: 30.0
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