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Gregory H. Moore [9]Gregory Moore [6]
  1. Gregory Moore (forthcoming). Nietzsche, Degeneration, and the Critique of Christianity. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
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  2. Gregory H. Moore (2011). Early History of the Generalized Continuum Hypothesis: 1878—1938. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 17 (4):489-532.
    This paper explores how the Generalized Continuum Hypothesis (GCH) arose from Cantor's Continuum Hypothesis in the work of Peirce, Jourdain, Hausdorff, Tarski, and how GCH was used up to Gödel's relative consistency result.
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  3. Gregory Moore & Thomas H. Brobjer (eds.) (2003). Nietzsche and Science. Ashgate.
    The first part of the book investigates Nietzsche's knowledge and understanding of specific disciplines and the influence of particular scientists on Nietzsche ...
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  4. Gregory Moore (2002). Art and Evolution: Nietzsche's Physiological Aesthetics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):109 – 126.
  5. Gregory Moore (2002). Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor. Cambridge University Press.
    Nietzsche, Biology and Metaphor explores the German philosopher's response to the intellectual debates sparked by the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species. By examining the abundance of biological metaphors in Nietzsche's writings, Gregory Moore questions his recent reputation as an eminently subversive and (post) modern thinker, and shows how deeply Nietzsche was immersed in late nineteenth-century debates on evolution, degeneration and race. The first part of the book provides a detailed study and new interpretation of Nietzsche's much disputed relationship (...)
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  6. Gregory Moore (2002). Nietzsche, Spencer, and the Ethics of Evolution. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 23 (1):1-20.
  7. Gregory Moore (2001). Hysteria and Histrionics: Nietzsche, Wagner and the Pathology of Genius. Nietzsche-Studien 30 (1).
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  8. Gregory H. Moore (1999). Historians and Philosophers of Logic: Are They Compatible? The Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem as a Case Study. History and Philosophy of Logic 20 (3-4):169-180.
    This paper combines personal reminiscences of the philosopher John Corcoran with a discussion of certain conflicts between historians of logic and philosophers of logic. Some mistaken claims about the history of the Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem are analyzed in detail and corrected.
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  9. Gregory H. Moore (1997). Hilbert and the Emergence of Modern Mathematical Logic. Theoria 12 (1):65-90.
    Hilbert’s unpublished 1917 lectures on logic, analyzed here, are the beginning of modern metalogic. In them he proved the consistency and Post-completeness (maximal consistency) of propositional logic -results traditionally credited to Bernays (1918) and Post (1921). These lectures contain the first formal treatment of first-order logic and form the core of Hilbert’s famous 1928 book with Ackermann. What Bernays, influenced by those lectures, did in 1918 was to change the emphasis from the consistency and Post-completeness of a logic to its (...)
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  10. Gregory H. Moore (ed.) (1994). The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell, Volume 3: Toward the 'Principles of Mathematics' 1900-02. Routledge.
    This volume shows Russell in transition from a neo-Kantian and neo-Hegelian philosopher to an analytic philosopher of the first rank. During this period his research centred on writing The Principles of Mathematics where he drew together previously unpublished drafts. These shed light on Russell's paradox. This material will alter previous accounts of how he discovered his paradox and the related paradox of the largest cardinal. The volume also includes a previously unpublished draft of an early attempt to solve his paradox, (...)
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  11. Bernhard Banaschewski & Gregory H. Moore (1990). The Dual Cantor-Bernstein Theorem and the Partition Principle. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 31 (3):375-381.
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  12. Gregory H. Moore (1987). Review: Michael Hallett, Cantorian Set Theory and Limitation of Size. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 52 (2):568-570.
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  13. Gregory H. Moore (1983). Lebesgue's Measure Problem and Zermelo's Axiom of Choice. In Joseph Warren Dauben & Virginia Staudt Sexton (eds.), History and Philosophy of Science: Selected Papers. New York Academy of Sciences.
     
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  14. Gregory H. Moore (1980). Beyond First-Order Logic: The Historical Interplay Between Mathematical Logic and Axiomatic Set Theory. History and Philosophy of Logic 1 (1-2):95-137.
    What has been the historical relationship between set theory and logic? On the one hand, Zermelo and other mathematicians developed set theory as a Hilbert-style axiomatic system. On the other hand, set theory influenced logic by suggesting to Schröder, Löwenheim and others the use of infinitely long expressions. The questions of which logic was appropriate for set theory - first-order logic, second-order logic, or an infinitary logic - culminated in a vigorous exchange between Zermelo and Gödel around 1930.
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  15. Gregory H. Moore (1978). The Origins of Zermelo's Axiomatization of Set Theory. Journal of Philosophical Logic 7 (1):307 - 329.
    What gave rise to Ernst Zermelo's axiomatization of set theory in 1908? According to the usual interpretation, Zermelo was motivated by the set-theoretic paradoxes. This paper argues that Zermelo was primarily motivated, not by the paradoxes, but by the controversy surrounding his 1904 proof that every set can be wellordered, and especially by a desire to preserve his Axiom of Choice from its numerous critics. Here Zermelo's concern for the foundations of mathematics diverged from Bertrand Russell's on the one hand (...)
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