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Gregory S. Kavka [53]Gregory Stephen Kavka [1]
  1. Gregory S. Kavka (1983). The Toxin Puzzle. Analysis 43 (1):33-36.
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  2.  30
    Gregory S. Kavka (1986). Hobbesian Moral and Political Theory. Princeton University Press.
    In fact, it requires two major social institutions--morality and government--working in a coordinated fashion to do so. This is one of the main themes of Hobbes's philosophy that will be developed in this book.
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  3. Gregory S. Kavka (1982). The Paradox of Future Individuals. Philosophy and Public Affairs 11 (2):93-112.
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  4. Gregory S. Kavka (1983). Hobbes's War of All Against All. Ethics 93 (2):291-310.
  5. Gregory S. Kavka (1979). The Numbers Should Count. Philosophical Studies 36 (3):285 - 294.
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  6.  31
    Gregory S. Kavka (1991). Is Individual Choice Less Problematic Than Collective Choice? Economics and Philosophy 7 (2):143.
    It is commonplace to suppose that the theory of individual rational choice is considerably less problematic than the theory of collective rational choice. In particular, it is often assumed by philosophers, economists, and other social scientists that an individual's choices among outcomes accurately reflect that individual's underlying preferences or values. Further, it is now well known that if an individual's choices among outcomes satisfy certain plausible axioms of rationality or consistency, that individual's choice-behavior can be interpreted as maximizing expected utility (...)
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  7.  87
    Gregory S. Kavka (1978). Some Paradoxes of Deterrence. Journal of Philosophy 75 (6):285-302.
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  8.  83
    Gregory S. Kavka (1995). Why Even Morally Perfect People Would Need Government. Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (01):1-18.
    Why do we need government? A common view is that government is necessary to constrain people's conduct toward one another, because people are not sufficiently virtuous to exercise the requisite degree of control on their own. This view was expressed perspicuously, and artfully, by liberal thinker James Madison, in The Federalist , number 51, where he wrote: “If men were angels, no government would be necessary.” Madison's idea is shared by writers ranging across the political spectrum. It finds clear expression (...)
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  9. Gregory S. Kavka (1995). The Rationality of Rule-Following: Hobbes's Dispute with the Foole. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 14 (1):5 - 34.
  10.  30
    Gregory S. Kavka (1983). When Two 'Wrongs' Make a Right: An Essay on Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 2 (1):61 - 66.
    Sometimes two wrongs do make a right. That is, others' violations of moral rules may make it permissible for one to also violate these rules, to avoid being unfairly disadvantaged. This claim, originally advanced by Hobbes, is applied to three cases in business. It is suggested that the claim is one source of scepticism concerning business ethics. I argue, however, that the conditions under which business competitors' violations of moral rules would render one's own violations permissible are quite restricted. Hence, (...)
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  11.  53
    Jules L. Coleman, Christopher W. Morris & Gregory S. Kavka (eds.) (1998). Rational Commitment and Social Justice: Essays for Gregory Kavka. Cambridge University Press.
    Greg Kavka (1947-1994) was a prominent and influential figure in contemporary moral and political philosophy. The new essays in this volume are concerned with fundamental issues of rational commitment and social justice to which Kavka devoted his work as a philosopher. The essays take Kavka's work as a point of departure and seek to advance the respective debates. The topics include: the relationship between intention and moral action as part of which Kavka's famous 'toxin puzzle' is a focus of discussion, (...)
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  12. Gregory S. Kavka (1982). An Internal Critique of Nozick's Entitlement Theory. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 63 (4):371.
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  13.  21
    Gregory S. Kavka (1982). Deterrence and Utility Again: A Response to Bernard. Theory and Decision 14 (1):99-102.
  14.  12
    Gregory S. Kavka (1974). Extensional Equivalence and Utilitarian Generalization. Theoria 40 (3):125-147.
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  15.  55
    Gregory S. Kavka (1983). Right Reason and Natural Law in Hobbes's Ethics. The Monist 66 (1):120-133.
  16.  21
    Gregory S. Kavka (1980). Deterrence, Utility, and Rational Choice. Theory and Decision 12 (1):41-60.
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  17.  42
    Gregory S. Kavka (1987). Nuclear Weapons and World Government. The Monist 70 (3):298-315.
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  18.  41
    Gregory S. Kavka (1991). Was the Gulf War a Just War? Journal of Social Philosophy 22 (1):20-29.
    In the early months of 1991, the United States—in alliance with a number of other nations—fought a large scale air and ground war to evict Iraq's occupying army from the emirate of Kuwait. In this paper, I will consider the question of whether this U.S. military campaign was a just war according to the criteria of traditional just war theory—the only developed moral theory of warfare that we have. My aim, however, is not so much to reach a verdict about (...)
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  19.  41
    Gregory S. Kavka (1983). Rule by Fear. Noûs 17 (4):601-620.
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  20.  12
    Gregory S. Kavka (1991). Is Individual Choice Less Problematic Than Collective Choice? Economics and Philosophy 7 (2):143-165.
    It is commonplace to suppose that the theory of individual rational choice is considerably less problematic than the theory of collective rational choice. In particular, it is often assumed by philosophers, economists, and other social scientists that an individual's choices among outcomes accurately reflect that individual's underlying preferences or values. Further, it is now well known that if an individual's choices among outcomes satisfy certain plausible axioms of rationality or consistency, that individual's choice-behavior can be interpreted as maximizing expected utility (...)
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  21. John P. Holdren, Paul R. Ehrlich, Anne Ehrlich, Gary Stahl, Berel Lang, Richard H. Popkin, Joseph Margolis, Patrick Morgan, John Hare, Russell Hardin, Richard A. Watson, Gregory S. Kavka, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Sidney Axinn, Terry Nardin, Douglas P. Lackey, Jefferson McMahan, Edmund Pellegrino, Stephen Toulmin, Dietrich Fischer, Edward F. McClennen, Louis Rene Beres, Arne Naess, Richard Falk & Milton Fisk (1986). Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity: The Fundamental Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The excellent quality and depth of the various essays make [the book] an invaluable resource....It is likely to become essential reading in its field.—CHOICE.
     
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  22.  28
    Gregory S. Kavka (1992). Disability and the Right to Work. Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (1):262.
    It is, perhaps, a propitious time to discuss the economic rights of disabled persons. In recent years, the media in the United States have re-ported on such notable events as: students at the nation's only college for the deaf stage a successful protest campaign to have a deaf individual ap-pointed president of their institution; a book by a disabled British physicist on the origins of the universe becomes a best seller; a pitcher with only one arm has a successful rookie (...)
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  23.  40
    Gregory S. Kavka (1975). Extensional Equivalence and Utilitarian Generalization. Theoria 41 (3):125-147.
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  24.  28
    Gregory S. Kavka (1983). Review. [REVIEW] Topoi 2 (2):227-230.
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  25.  20
    Gregory S. Kavka (1980). What Is Newcomb's Problem About? American Philosophical Quarterly 17 (4):271 - 280.
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  26.  22
    Gregory S. Kavka (1988). Some Neglected Liberal Aspects of Hobbes's Philosophy. Hobbes Studies 1 (1):89-108.
  27.  35
    Gregory S. Kavka (1986). A Critique of Pure Defense. Journal of Philosophy 83 (11):625-633.
  28.  34
    Gregory S. Kavka (1975). Rawls on Average and Total Utility. Philosophical Studies 27 (4):237 - 253.
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  29.  15
    Gregory S. Kavka (1982). Two Solutions to the Paradox of Revolution. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 7 (1):455-472.
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  30.  29
    Gregory S. Kavka (1983). Doubts About Unilateral Nuclear Disarmament. Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (3):255-260.
  31.  20
    Gregory S. Kavka (1993). Internal Prisoner's Dilemma Vindicated. Economics and Philosophy 9 (1):171.
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  32.  26
    Gregory S. Kavka (1974). Wrongdoing and Guilt. Journal of Philosophy 71 (18):663-664.
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  33.  14
    Gregory S. Kavka (1993). Rationality Triumphant: Gauthier's Moral Theory. Dialogue 32 (02):347-.
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  34.  18
    Gregory S. Kavka (1985). Space War Ethics. Ethics 95 (3):673-691.
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  35.  14
    Gregory S. Kavka (1991). Book Review:Reason and Morality: A Defense of the Egocentric Perspective. Richard Fumerton. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (3):644-.
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  36.  9
    Gregory S. Kavka (1991). Markets, Morals and the Law, Jules L. Coleman. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988, Xvii + 393 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 7 (1):105-112.
  37.  9
    Gregory S. Kavka (1976). Eschatological Falsification. Religious Studies 12 (2):201 - 205.
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  38.  8
    Gregory S. Kavka (1992). Book Review:The Limits of Government: An Essay on the Public Goods Argument. David Schmidtz. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (2):399-.
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  39.  7
    Gregory S. Kavka (1989). Sweethearts of SDI: A Response to Woodward. Ethics 99 (3):572-573.
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  40.  6
    Gregory S. Kavka (1990). Some Social Benefits of Uncertainty. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):311-326.
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  41.  5
    Gregory S. Kavka (1993). Book Review:Justice Between Age Groups and Generations. Peter Laslett, James S. Fishkin. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (1):184-.
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  42.  2
    Gregory S. Kavka (1994). Review: The Costs of Crimes: Coleman Amended. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (3):582 - 592.
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  43.  2
    Gregory S. Kavka (1994). The Costs of Crimes: Coleman Amended:Risks and Wrongs. Jules L. Coleman. Ethics 104 (3):582-.
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  44. John Charvet, Joshua Cohen, David Gauthier, M. M. Goldsmith, Jean Hampton, Gregory S. Kavka, Patrick Riley, Arthur Ripstein & A. John Simmons (1998). The Social Contract Theorists: Critical Essays on Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This rich collection will introduce students of philosophy and politics to the contemporary critical literature on the classical social contract political thinkers Thomas Hobbes , John Locke , and Jean-Jacques Rousseau . A dozen essays and book excerpts have been selected to guide students through the texts and to introduce them to current scholarly controversies surrounding the contractarian political theories of these three thinkers.
     
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  45. Gregory S. Kavka (1986). A Critique of Pure Defense. Journal of Philosophy 83 (11):625-633.
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  46. Gregory S. Kavka (1995). Contemporary Political and Social Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  47. Gregory S. Kavka (1976). Eschatological Falsification: GREGORY S. KAVKA. Religious Studies 12 (2):201-205.
    In a well-known article, 1 John Hick argues that the proposition ‘God exists' is, in principle, verifiable but is not falsifiable. Essentially, his argument is that while no experience in this life could conclusively disprove the existence of the Christian God, certain experiences one might have in the after-life would conclusively verify the existence of the Christian God. In particular, he argues that post mortem experiences of Christ ruling in the Kingdom of God would constitute a verification of the existence (...)
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  48. Gregory S. Kavka (1991). Jules L. Coleman's "Markets, Morals and the Law". [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 7:105.
     
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  49. Gregory S. Kavka (1987). Moral Paradoxes of Nuclear Deterrence. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume examines the complex and vitally important ethical questions connected with the deployment of nuclear weapons and their use as a deterrent. A number of the essays contained here have already established themselves as penetrating and significant contributions to the debate on nuclear ethics. They have been revised to bring out their unity and coherence, and are integrated with new essays. The books exceptional rigor and clarity make it valuable whether the reader's concern with nuclear ethics is professional or (...)
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  50. Gregory S. Kavka & Renford Bambrough (1981). Moral Scepticism and Moral Knowledge. Philosophical Review 90 (4):630.
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