23 found
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  1.  65
    Guido Palazzo & Andreas Georg Scherer (2006). Corporate Legitimacy as Deliberation: A Communicative Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 66 (1):71 - 88.
    Modern society is challenged by a loss of efficiency in national governance systems values, and lifestyles. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) discourse builds upon a conception of organizational legitimacy that does not appropriately reflect these changes. The problems arise from the a-political role of the corporation in the concepts of cognitive and pragmatic legitimacy, which are based on compliance to national law and on relatively homogeneous and stable societal expectations on the one hand and widely accepted rhetoric assuming that all members (...)
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  2.  75
    Guido Palazzo & Ulf Richter (2005). CSR Business as Usual? The Case of the Tobacco Industry. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):387 - 401.
    Tobacco companies have started to position themselves as good corporate citizens. The effort towards CSR engagement in the tobacco industry is not only heavily criticized by anti-tobacco NGOs. Some opponents such as the the World Health Organization have even categorically questioned the possibility of social responsibility in the tobacco industry. The paper will demonstrate that the deep distrust towards tobacco companies is linked to the lethal character of their products and the dubious behavior of their representatives in recent decades. As (...)
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  3.  11
    Sébastien Mena & Guido Palazzo (2012). Input and Output Legitimacy of Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3):527-556.
    In a globalizing world, governments are not always able or willing to regulate the social and environmental externalities of global business activities. Multi-stakeholder initiatives , defined as global institutions involving mainly corporations and civil society organizations, are one type of regulatory mechanism that tries to fill this gap by issuing soft law regulation. This conceptual paper examines the conditions of a legitimate transfer of regulatory power from traditional democratic nation-state processes to private regulatory schemes, such as MSIs. Democratic legitimacy is (...)
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  4.  9
    Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dirk Matten (2009). The Changing Role of Business in Global Society. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
    This article assesses some of the implications of globalization for the scholarly debate on business ethics, CSR and related concepts. The argument is based, among other things, on the declining capacity of nation state institutions to regulate socially desirable corporate behavior as well as the growing corporate exposure to heterogeneous social, cultural and political values in societies globally. It is argued that these changes are shifting the corporate role towards a sphere of societal governance hitherto dominated by traditional political actors. (...)
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  5.  32
    Guido Palazzo, Franciska Krings & Ulrich Hoffrage (2012). Ethical Blindness. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):323-338.
    Many models of (un)ethical decision making assume that people decide rationally and are in principle able to evaluate their decisions from a moral point of view. However, people might behave unethically without being aware of it. They are ethically blind. Adopting a sensemaking approach, we argue that ethical blindness results from a complex interplay between individual sensemaking activities and context factors.
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  6.  42
    Dorothea Baur & Guido Palazzo (2011). The Moral Legitimacy of NGOs as Partners of Corporations. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):579-604.
    Partnerships between companies and NGOs have received considerable at­tention in CSR in the past years. However, the role of NGO legitimacy in such partnerships has thus far been neglected. We argue that NGOs assume a status as special stakeholders of corporations which act on behalf of the common good. This role requires a particular focus on their moral legitimacy. We introduce a conceptual framework for analysing the moral legitimacy of NGOs along three dimensions, building on the theory of deliberative democracy. (...)
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  7.  13
    Jean-Pascal Gond, Guido Palazzo & Kunal Basu (2009). Reconsidering Instrumental Corporate Social Responsibility Through the Mafia Metaphor. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (1):57-85.
    The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate the instrumental perspective on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in practice and theory by relying on sociological analyses of a well known organization: the Italian Mafia. Legal businesses might share features of the Mafia, such as the propensity to exploit a governance vacuum in society, a strong organizational identity that demarcates the inside from the outside, and an extreme profit motive. Instrumental CSR practices have the power to accelerate a firm’s transition to (...)
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  8.  36
    Guido Palazzo & Kunal Basu (2007). The Ethical Backlash of Corporate Branding. Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):333 - 346.
    Past decades have witnessed the growing success of branding as a corporate activity as well as a rise in anti-brand activism. While appearing to be contradictory, both trends have emerged from common sources – the transition from industrial to post-industrial society, and the advent of globalization – the examination of which might lead to a socially grounded understanding of why brand success in the future is likely to demand more than superior product performance, placing increasing demand on corporations with regard (...)
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  9.  21
    Michael Gonin, Guido Palazzo & Ulrich Hoffrage (2012). Neither Bad Apple nor Bad Barrel: How the Societal Context Impacts Unethical Behavior in Organizations. Business Ethics 21 (1):31-46.
    Every time another corporate scandal captures media headlines, the ‘bad apple vs. bad barrel’ discussion starts anew. Yet this debate overlooks the influence of the broader societal context on organizational behavior. In this article, we argue that misbehaviors of organizations (the ‘barrels’) and their members (the ‘apples’) cannot be addressed properly without a clear understanding of their broader context (the ‘larder’). Whereas previously, a strong societal framework dampened the practical application of the Homo economicus concept (business actors as perfectly rational (...)
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  10.  30
    N. Craig Smith, Guido Palazzo & C. B. Bhattacharya (2010). Marketing's Consequences. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication to counter the (...)
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  11.  33
    Guido Palazzo & Lena Rethel (2008). Conflicts of Interest in Financial Intermediation. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):193 - 207.
    The last years have seen a surge of scandals in financial intermediation. This article argues that the agency structure inherent to most forms of financial intermediation gives rise to conflicts of interest. Though this does not excuse scandalous behavior it points out market imperfections. There are four types of conflicts of interest: personal-individual, personal-organizational, impersonal-individual, and finally, impersonal-organizational conflicts. Analyzing recent scandals we find that all four types of conflicts of interest prevail in financial intermediation.
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  12. Guido Palazzo & Andreas Georg Scherer (2006). Corporate Legitimacy as Deliberation: A Communicative Framework. Journal of Business Ethics 66 (1):71-88.
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  13.  5
    N. Craig Smith, Guido Palazzo & C. B. Bhattacharya (2010). Marketing's Consequences. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication to counter the (...)
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  14. Guido Palazzo & Ulf Richter (2005). CSR Business as Usual? The Case of the Tobacco Industry. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):387-401.
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  15.  12
    Guido Palazzo & Dorothée Baumann (2006). Andreas Georg Scherer. Business Ethics Quarterly 16:505-532.
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  16.  13
    Judith Schrempf & Guido Palazzo (2011). How to Create the Ethical Consumer. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:532-543.
    Consumer surveys confirm two facts: First, consumers are aware of social and ethical side effects of production and consumption. Second, consumers indicate an intention to adapt their consumption behavior. Despite their willingness to change, consumers do not engage in ethical consumption behavior. We assert that the ethical consumer needs to be created and propose two mechanisms how corporations can cocreate the ethical consumer: Influencing external institutional factors and influencing internal psychological factors.
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  17.  10
    Jean-Pascal Gond & Guido Palazzo (2005). The Socially Responsible Corporation, The Law and The Sicilian Mafia. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:124-129.
    The purpose of this paper is to provoke a debate on the management of social issues building on the analysis of a well known illegal organization, namely theSicilian Mafia. According to the analytical framework provided by Gambetta (1993), the Sicilian Mafia could be considered as a business on its own dealing a specific commodity: the ‘protection of people’. That approach of ‘Mafia as a corporation’ allows investigating the social responsibility of that organization and the way the Mafia managed its key (...)
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  18.  11
    Judith Schrempf & Guido Palazzo (2012). Historic Corporate Responsibility. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:26-37.
    During the last years, historic injustices have been on top of the public agenda revolving around the question of how to deal with difficult pasts. This applies togovernments but also to corporations. We aim at addressing this trend of historic corporate responsibility. We examine corporations as intergenerational moral agents, introduce the problem of historic complicity, and propose a concept of historic corporate responsibility.
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  19. Dorothee Baumann-Pauly, Andreas Georg Scherer & Guido Palazzo (forthcoming). Managing Institutional Complexity: A Longitudinal Study of Legitimacy Strategies at a Sportswear Brand Company. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  20. Michael Gonin, Guido Palazzo & Ulrich Hoffrage (2012). Neither Bad Apple nor Bad Barrel: How the Societal Context Impacts Unethical Behavior in Organizations. Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (1):31-46.
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  21. Guido Palazzo & Lena Rethel (2008). Conflicts of Interest in Financial Intermediation. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):193-207.
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  22. Guido Palazzo & Kunal Basu (2007). The Ethical Backlash of Corporate Branding. Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):333-346.
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  23. Guido Palazzo & Judith Schrempf-Stirling (2016). Upstream Corporate Social Responsibility: The Evolution From Contract Responsibility to Full Producer Responsibility. Business and Society 55 (4):491-527.
    The debate about the appropriate standards for upstream corporate social responsibility of multinational corporations has been on the public and academic agenda for some three decades. The debate originally focused narrowly on “contract responsibility” of MNCs for monitoring of upstream contractors for “sweatshop” working conditions violating employee rights. The authors argue that the MNC upstream responsibility debate has shifted qualitatively over time to “full producer responsibility” involving an expansion from “contract responsibility” in three distinct dimensions. First, there is an expansion (...)
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