6 found
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Guy E. Hawkins [4]Guy Hawkins [2]
  1.  5
    Matthias Mittner, Guy E. Hawkins, Wouter Boekel & Birte U. Forstmann (2016). A Neural Model of Mind Wandering. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (8):570-578.
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  2.  17
    Guy Hawkins, Melissa Prince, Scott Brown & Andrew Heathcote (2010). Designing State-Trace Experiments to Assess the Number of Latent Psychological Variables Underlying Binary Choices. In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society
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  3.  28
    Guy Hawkins, Scott D. Brown, Mark Steyvers & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers (2012). Context Effects in Multi-Alternative Decision Making: Empirical Data and a Bayesian Model. Cognitive Science 36 (3):498-516.
    For decisions between many alternatives, the benchmark result is Hick's Law: that response time increases log-linearly with the number of choice alternatives. Even when Hick's Law is observed for response times, divergent results have been observed for error rates—sometimes error rates increase with the number of choice alternatives, and sometimes they are constant. We provide evidence from two experiments that error rates are mostly independent of the number of choice alternatives, unless context effects induce participants to trade speed for accuracy (...)
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  4.  3
    Brett K. Hayes, Guy E. Hawkins, Ben R. Newell, Martina Pasqualino & Bob Rehder (2014). The Role of Causal Models in Multiple Judgments Under Uncertainty. Cognition 133 (3):611-620.
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  5.  7
    Guy E. Hawkins, A. A. J. Marley, Andrew Heathcote, Terry N. Flynn, Jordan J. Louviere & Scott D. Brown (2014). Integrating Cognitive Process and Descriptive Models of Attitudes and Preferences. Cognitive Science 38 (4):701-735.
    Discrete choice experiments—selecting the best and/or worst from a set of options—are increasingly used to provide more efficient and valid measurement of attitudes or preferences than conventional methods such as Likert scales. Discrete choice data have traditionally been analyzed with random utility models that have good measurement properties but provide limited insight into cognitive processes. We extend a well-established cognitive model, which has successfully explained both choices and response times for simple decision tasks, to complex, multi-attribute discrete choice data. The (...)
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  6. Guy E. Hawkins, Brett K. Hayes & Evan Heit (2016). A Dynamic Model of Reasoning and Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (2):155-180.
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