Search results for 'Guy Hoffman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Guy Hoffman (2012). Embodied Cognition for Autonomous Interactive Robots. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):759-772.score: 240.0
  2. Romero Baró, José Ma & Alain Guy (eds.) (2005). Homenaje a Alain Guy. Publicacions I Edicions de la Universitat de Barcelona.score: 210.0
    El filósofo francés Alain Guy (La Rochelle, 1918 - Narbonne, 1998) dedicó por entero su vida al estudio de la filosofía española e hispanoamericana, dándola a conocer no sólo en el extranjero sino también en nuestro país.
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  3. Paul Hoffman (2009). Essays on Descartes. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This is a collection of Paul Hoffman's wide-ranging essays on Descartes composed over the past twenty-five years. The essays in Part I include his celebrated "The Unity of Descartes' Man," in which he argues that Descartes accepts the Aristotelian view that soul and body are related as form to matter and that the human being is a substance; a series of subsequent essays elaborating on this interpretation and defending it against objections; and an essay on Descartes' theory of distinction. (...)
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  4. Mollie Painter-Morland, Juan Fontrodona, W. Michael Hoffman & Mark Rowe (2003). Conversations Across Continents: Teaching Business Ethics Online. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):75-88.score: 60.0
    The paper focuses on an online business ethics course that three professors (Painter-Morland, Fontrodona and Hoffman) taught together, and in which the fourth author (Rowe) participated as a student, from their respective locations on three continents. The course was conducted using Centra software, which allowed for synchronous online interaction. The class included students from Europe, South Africa and the United States. In order to assess the value of synchronous online teaching for ethics training, the paper identifies certain knowledge, skills (...)
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  5. Piotr Hoffman (1989). Violence in Modern Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    Following on the arguments adumbrated in his previous works, Piotr Hoffman here argues that the notion of and concern with violence are not limited to political philosophy but in fact form the essential component of philosophy in general. The acute awareness of the ever-present possibility of violence, Hoffman claims, filters into and informs ontology and epistemology in ways that require careful analysis. In his previous book, Doubt, Time, Violence , Hoffman explored the theme of violence in relation (...)
     
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  6. Paul Hoffman (2007). Descartes's Watch Analogy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (3):561-567.score: 30.0
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 15, 2007, pp. 561-567. (Author Posting. (c) Taylor & Francis, 2007. It is posted here by permission of Taylor & Francis for personal use, not for redistribution.).
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  7. Paul Hoffman (2002). Direct Realism, Intentionality, and the Objective Being of Ideas. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):163-179.score: 30.0
    My aim is to arrive at a better understanding of the distinction between direct realism and representationalism by offering a critical analysis of Steven Nadler.
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  8. Martin L. Hoffman (2001). How Automatic and Representational is Empathy, and Why. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):38-39.score: 30.0
    The claim that empathy is both automatic and representational is criticized as follows: (a) five empathy-arousing processes ranging from conditioning and mimicry to prospective-taking show that empathy can be either automatic or representational, and only under certain circumstances, both; (b) although automaticity decreases, empathy increases with age and cognitive development; (c) observers' causal attributions can shift rapidly and produce more complex empathic responses than the theory allows.
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  9. Robert Deltete & Reed Guy (1991). Einstein and EPR. Philosophy of Science 58 (3):377-397.score: 30.0
    Recent studies have shown that Einstein did not write the EPR paper and that he was disappointed with the outcome. He thought, rightly, that his own argument for the incompleteness of quantum theory was badly presented in the paper. We reconstruct the argument of EPR, indicate the reasons Einstein was dissatisfied with it, and discuss Einstein's own argument. We show that many commentators have been misled by the obscurity of EPR into proposing interpretations of its argument that do not accurately (...)
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  10. Paul Hoffman (2002). Descartes's Theory of Distinction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (1):57-78.score: 30.0
    In the first part of this paper I explore the relations among distinctness, separability, number, and non-identity. I argue that Descartes believes plurality in things themselves arises from distinction, so that things distinct in any of the three ways are not identical. The only exception concerns universals which, considered in things themselves, are identical to particulars. I also argue that to be distinct is to be separable. Things distinct by reason are separable only in thought by means of ideas not (...)
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  11. Paul Hoffman (2005). Locke on the Locked Room. Locke Studies 5:57-73.score: 30.0
  12. Robert J. Deltete & Reed A. Guy (1996). Emerging From Imaginary Time. Synthese 108 (2):185 - 203.score: 30.0
    Recent models in quantum cosmology make use of the concept of imaginary time. These models all conjecture a join between regions of imaginary time and regions of real time. We examine the model of James Hartle and Stephen Hawking to argue that the various no-boundary attempts to interpret the transition from imaginary to real time in a logically consistent and physically significant way all fail. We believe this conclusion also applies to quantum tunneling models, such as that proposed by Alexander (...)
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  13. Paul Hoffman (2005). Aquinas on Threats and Temptations. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):225–242.score: 30.0
    Aquinas maintains that when we succumb to temptation our actions are wholly voluntary. When we give up a good in the face of a threat our actions are partly involuntary, but they are more voluntary than involuntary. I argue that when we succumb to temptation our actions can also be partly involuntary. I also defend my intuition that in some mixed cases our action is more involuntary than voluntary, and I show how Aquinas’s psychological theory can explain this. Finally, I (...)
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  14. Paul Hoffman (1986). The Unity of Descartes's Man. Philosophical Review 95 (3):339-370.score: 30.0
    ne of the leading problems for Cartesian dualism is to provide an account of the union of mind and body. This problem is often construed to be one of explaining how thinking things and extended things can causally interact. That is, it needs to be explained how thoughts in the mind can produce motions in the body and how motions in the body can produce sensations, appetites, and emotions in the mind. The conclusion often drawn, as it was by three (...)
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  15. W. Michael Hoffman & Jennifer Mills Moore (1982). What is Business Ethics? A Reply to Peter Drucker. Journal of Business Ethics 1 (4):293 - 300.score: 30.0
    In his What is Business Ethics? Peter Drucker accuses business ethics of singling out business unfairly for special ethical treatment, of subordinating ethical to political concerns, and of being, not ethics at all, but ethical chic. We contend that Drucker's denunciation of business ethics rests upon a fundamental misunderstanding of the field. This article is a response to his charges and an effort to clarify the nature, scope and purpose of business ethics.
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  16. Paul Hoffman (2006). Thomas Reid's Notion of Exertion. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):431-447.score: 30.0
    : Thomas Reid uses the notion of exertion in various ways that have not been distinguished in the secondary literature. Sometimes he uses it to refer to the exercise of a capacity or power, sometimes to the turning on or activitating of a capacity or power, and still other times to the attempt to activate a capacity or power. Getting clear on Reid's different uses of the term 'exertion' is essential to understanding his account of the sequence of events in (...)
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  17. Paul Hoffman (1985). Kripke on Private Language. Philosophical Studies 47 (1):23-28.score: 30.0
  18. Paul David Hoffman (1999). Cartesian Composites. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (2):251-270.score: 30.0
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  19. Joshua Hoffman (2011). Metametaphysics and Substance: Two Case Studies. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 21 (4):491-505.score: 30.0
    This paper examines an often-ignored aspect of the evaluation of metaphysical analyses, namely, their ontological commitments. Such evaluations are part of metaphysical methodology, and reflection on this methodology is itself part of metametaphysics. I will develop a theory for assessing what these commitments are, and then I will apply it to an important historical and an important contemporary metaphysical analysis of the concept of an individual substance (i.e., an object, or thing). I claim that in evaluating metaphysical analyses, we should (...)
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  20. Joshua Hoffman & Gary Rosenkrantz (1997). Substance: Its Nature and Existence. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Substance: Its Nature and Existence investigates the very nature and existence of individual substances, including both living things and inanimate objects. It provides an accessible introduction to the history and contemporary debates of this important and often complex issue. Starting with a critical survey of the main historical attempts by Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, Locke and Hume to provide an analysis of substance, the authors present the view that a substance must satisfy an independence condition which could not be satisfied by (...)
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  21. Mary E. Guy (1990). Ethical Decision Making in Everyday Work Situations. Quorum Books.score: 30.0
    This book takes a new approach to ethics by focusing on the kinds of dilemmas that confront people almost daily on the job.
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  22. Ginger A. Hoffman, Anne Harrington & Howard L. Fields (2005). Pain and the Placebo: What We Have Learned. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (2):248-265.score: 30.0
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  23. Paul Hoffman (2008). Freedom and Weakness of Will. Ratio 21 (1):42–54.score: 30.0
    Can absolute freedom of will be defended by arguing that apparent cases of diminished freedom when we act out of passion are cases of weakness of will? Rogers Albritton thought so. What is intriguing about Albritton's view is that he thought when we act from desire we are making choices, yet our desires are not functioning as reasons for those choices. So our desires must be influencing our choices in some other unspecified way that does not diminish our freedom. I (...)
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  24. Robert J. Deltete & Reed A. Guy (1997). Hartle-Hawking Cosmology and Unconditional Probabilities. Analysis 57 (4):304–315.score: 30.0
  25. Donald Hoffman (2008). Conscious Realism and the Mind-Body Problem. Mind and Matter 6 (1):87-121.score: 30.0
    Despite substantial efforts by many researchers, we still have no scientific theory of how brain activity can create or be con- scious experience. This is troubling since we have a large body of correlations between brain activity and consciousness, correlations normally assumed to entail that brain activity creates conscious experience. Here I explore a solution to the mind-body problem that starts with the converse assumption: these correlations arise because consciousness creates brain activity and indeed creates all objects and properties of (...)
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  26. Piotr Hoffman (2000). Heidegger and the Problem of Idealism. Inquiry 43 (4):403 – 411.score: 30.0
    Was Heidegger a 'realist' or an 'idealist'? The issue has been and continues to be hotly debated in Heidegger scholarship. Here it is argued that the much more desirable realistic interpretation of Heidegger can be sustained, provided his theory of moods is given its due. Moods, I argue, are not only 'equiprimordial' with Dasein's understanding of being, but are also irreducible to the latter. It is often held - correctly, as it seems to the author - that Heidegger's idealism is (...)
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  27. Robert Louis Hoffman (ed.) (1970/2010). Anarchism as Political Philosophy. Aldinetransaction.score: 30.0
    Against these are set pieces that argue anarchisms impossibility and estimate its relevance to social change.The debate format of Anarchism introduces the ...
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  28. Marcelo Hoffman (2007). Foucault's Politics and Bellicosity as a Matrix for Power Relations. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (6):756-778.score: 30.0
    From the early to mid-1970s, Michel Foucault posited that power consists of a relation rather than a substance and that this relation is comprised of unequal forces engaged in a warlike struggle against each other, resulting invariably in the domination of some forces over others. This understanding of power, which he retrospectively dubbed `Nietzsche's hypothesis' and `the model of war', underpinned his well-known analyses of disciplinary power. Yet, Foucault in his Collège de France course from the academic year 1975-6, (...)
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  29. Robert R. Hoffman (1960). The Problem of Other Minds - Genuine or Pseudo? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (June):503-512.score: 30.0
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  30. Donald D. Hoffman (2006). The Scrambling Theorem: A Simple Proof of the Logical Possibility of Spectrum Inversion. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):31-45.score: 30.0
    The possibility of spectrum inversion has been debated since it was raised by Locke and is still discussed because of its implications for functionalist theories of conscious experience . This paper provides a mathematical formulation of the question of spectrum inversion and proves that such inversions, and indeed bijective scramblings of color in general, are logically possible. Symmetries in the structure of color space are, for purposes of the proof, irrelevant. The proof entails that conscious experiences are not identical with (...)
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  31. Robert Hoffman (1966). Professor Hanson on 'Synthetic-Apriori'. Mind 75 (297):144.score: 30.0
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  32. Donald D. Hoffman (2006). The Scrambling Theorem Unscrambled: A Response to Commentaries. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):51-53.score: 30.0
  33. Sarah Hoffman, You Can't Mean That: Yablo's Figuralist Account of Mathematics.score: 30.0
    Burgess and Rosen argue that Yablo’s figuralist account of mathematics fails because it says mathematical claims are really only metaphorical. They suggest Yablo’s view is implausible as an account of what mathematicians say and confused about literal language. I show their argument isn’t decisive, briefly exploring some questions in the philosophy of language it raises, and argue Yablo’s view may be amended to a kind of revolutionary fictionalism not refuted by Burgess and Rosen.
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  34. Joshua Hoffman & Gary Rosenkrantz (1991). Are Souls Unintelligible? Philosophical Perspectives 5:183-212.score: 30.0
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  35. Ginger A. Hoffman & Jennifer L. Hansen (2011). Is Prozac a Feminist Drug? International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):89-120.score: 30.0
    There is a sense in which antidepressants are feminist drugs, liberating and empowering …A lot of things have been said about Prozac.1 We have been instructed both to "listen" and to "talk back" to Prozac (Kramer 1993; Breggin 1994), Prozac has been called a wonder drug (Schumer 1989; Cowley 1990), it has been described as capable of dramatically changing selves and dramatically changing our conception of what a self is (Kramer 1993), it has been accused of dulling our artistic drive (...)
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  36. Robert Hoffman (1971). On Begging the Question at Any Time. Analysis 32 (2):51 -.score: 30.0
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  37. Wilfried Kunde, Andrea Kiesel & Joachim Hoffman (2003). Conscious Control Over the Content of Unconscious Cognition. Cognition 88 (2):223-242.score: 30.0
  38. Joshua Hoffman & Gary Rosenkrantz (1984). Hard and Soft Facts. Philosophical Review 93 (3):419-434.score: 30.0
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  39. W. Michael Hoffman (1986). What is Necessary for Corporate Moral Excellence? Journal of Business Ethics 5 (3):233 - 242.score: 30.0
    At the beginning of this essay I sketch a solution to the question of how we can predicate moral properties, such as moral excellence, to the corporation. This solution suggests that there are at least two necessary criteria for corporate moral excellence: (1) a moral corporate culture and (2) the moral autonomy of the individual within the corporate culture. I put forward guidelines for the development of both and argue for their necessary interdependence.
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  40. R. Kent Guy (2000). Of Body and Brush: Grand Sacrifice as Text/Performance in Eighteenth-Century China (Review). Philosophy East and West 50 (4):623-625.score: 30.0
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  41. W. Michael Hoffman (1991). Business and Environmental Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (2):169-184.score: 30.0
    This paper explores some interconnections between the business and environmental ethics movements. The first section argues that business has obligations to protect the environment over and above what is required by environmental law and that it should cooperate and interact with government in establishing environmental regulation. Business must develop and demonstrate environmental moral leadership. The second section exposes the danger of using the rationale of "good ethics is good business" as a basis for such business moral leadership in both the (...)
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  42. Frank J. Hoffman (2002). Dao and Process. Asian Philosophy 12 (3):197 – 212.score: 30.0
    This paper is about different types of silence, and about differing processes of philosophical investigation and sagely illumination. It is argued that the sagely Dao of wu wei leads to silence in the sense of no spoken words, and the philosophical way of proof leads to silence in the sense of no spoken words. So both proof and wu wei both lead to silence in the sense of no spoken words. Accordingly there is a type of silence that results from (...)
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  43. Joshua Hoffman & Gary Rosenkrantz (1980). On Divine Foreknowledge and Human Freedom. Philosophical Studies 37 (3):289 - 296.score: 30.0
  44. Alfred Guy (1991). The Role of Aristotle's Praxis Today. Journal of Value Inquiry 25 (3):287-289.score: 30.0
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  45. Sarah Hoffman (2004). Fiction as Action. Philosophia 31 (3-4):513-529.score: 30.0
    Several accounts of the nature of fiction have been proposed that draw on speech act theory. I argue that speech act theory is insufficient for this task. Martinich’s, Searle’s and Currie’s accounts are considered and rejected. However dependent fiction may be on the intentional structure of communication, focus on this structure diverts attention from works themselves in an unhelpful way. The weakness inherent in speech act theory is that it does not have the resources to capture the most interesting processes (...)
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  46. Aviv Hoffman & Geraldine Coggins (2005). Metaphysics. Philosophical Books 46 (2):163-167.score: 30.0
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  47. Joshua Hoffman (1994). Substance Among Other Categories. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    This book revives a neglected but important topic in philosophy: the nature of substance. The belief that there are individual substances, for example, material objects and persons, is at the core of our common-sense view of the world yet many metaphysicians deny the very coherence of the concept of substance. The authors develop a novel account of what an individual substance is in terms of independence from other beings. In the process many other important ontological categories are explored: property, event, (...)
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  48. John Martin Fischer & Paul Hoffman (1994). Alternative Possibilities: A Reply to Lamb. Journal of Philosophy 91 (6):321-326.score: 30.0
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  49. Paul David Hoffman (1996). Descartes on Misrepresentation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):357-381.score: 30.0
    I examine Descartes's theory of cognition, taking as a starting point his account of how misperception is possible. In the Third Meditation Descartes introduces the hypothesis that there are ideas (such as the idea of cold) which seem to be of something real but which in fact represent nothing (if, for example, cold is a privation or absence of heat, rather than the presence of a positive quality). I argue, against Margaret Wilson, that Descartes does not think there are any (...)
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  50. W. Michael Hoffman (1984). Ethics in Business Education: Working Toward a Meaningful Reciprocity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 3 (4):259 - 268.score: 30.0
    This paper outlines and argues against some criticisms of business ethics education. It maintains that these criticisms have been put forward due to a misunderstanding of the nature of business and/or ethics. Business ethics seeks a meaningful reciprocity among economic, social and moral concerns. This demands that business organizations autonomously develop ethical goals from within, which in turn demands a reciprocity between ethical theory and practical experience. Working toward such a reciprocity, the ultimate goal of business ethics education is a (...)
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