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Guy C. Van Orden [7]Guy van Orden [7]
  1. Raymond W. Gibbs & Guy van Orden (2012). Pragmatic Choice in Conversation. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):7-20.
    How do people decide what to say in context? Many theories of pragmatics assume that people have specialized knowledge that drives them to utter certain words in different situations. But these theories are mostly unable to explain both the regularity and variability in people’s speech behaviors. Our purpose in this article is to advance a view of pragmatics based on complexity theory, which specifically explains the pragmatic choices speakers make in conversations. The concept of self-organized criticality sheds light on how (...)
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  2. Michael A. Riley, Kevin Shockley & Guy van Orden (2012). Learning From the Body About the Mind. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):21-34.
    In some areas of cognitive science we are confronted with ultrafast cognition, exquisite context sensitivity, and scale-free variation in measured cognitive activities. To move forward, we suggest a need to embrace this complexity, equipping cognitive science with tools and concepts used in the study of complex dynamical systems. The science of movement coordination has benefited already from this change, successfully circumventing analogous paradoxes by treating human activities as phenomena of self-organization. Therein, action and cognition are seen to be emergent in (...)
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  3. Damian G. Stephen & Guy van Orden (2012). Searching for General Principles in Cognitive Performance: Reply to Commentators. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):94-102.
    The commentators expressed concerns regarding the relevance and value of non-computational non-symbolic explanations of cognitive performance. But what counts as an “explanation” depends on the pre-theoretical assumptions behind the scenes of empirical science regarding the kinds of variables and relationships that are sought out in the first place, and some of the present disagreements stem from incommensurate assumptions. Traditional cognitive science presumes cognition to be a decomposable system of components interacting according to computational rules to generate cognitive performances (i.e., component-dominant (...)
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  4. Guy van Orden & Damian G. Stephen (2012). Is Cognitive Science Usefully Cast as Complexity Science? Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):3-6.
    Readers of TopiCS are invited to join a debate about the utility of ideas and methods of complexity science. The topics of debate include empirical instances of qualitative change in cognitive activity and whether this empirical work demonstrates sufficiently the empirical flags of complexity. In addition, new phenomena discovered by complexity scientists, and motivated by complexity theory, call into question some basic assumptions of conventional cognitive science such as stable equilibria and homogeneous variance. The articles and commentaries that appear in (...)
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  5. Sebastian Wallot & Guy Van Orden (2012). Ultrafast Cognition. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (5-6):5-6.
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  6. Christopher T. Kello, Gordon D. A. Brown, Ramon Ferrer-I.-Cancho, John G. Holden, Klaus Linkenkaer-Hansen, Theo Rhodes & Guy C. Van Orden (2010). Scaling Laws in Cognitive Sciences. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (5):223-232.
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  7. Heidi Kloos & Guy Van Orden (2010). Voluntary Behavior in Cognitive and Motor Tasks. Mind and Matter 8 (1):19-43.
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  8. Christopher T. Kello, Gregory G. Anderson, John G. Holden & Guy C. Van Orden (2008). The Pervasiveness of 1/F Scaling in Speech Reflects the Metastable Basis of Cognition. Cognitive Science 32 (7):1217-1231.
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  9. Guy van Orden (2006). Brad Thompson John Tienson Michael Tomasello JD Trout. Philosophical Psychology 19 (6):853-854.
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  10. Eric L. Amazeen & Guy C. Van Orden (2004). Specificity in a Global Array is Only One Possibility. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):887-888.
    The suggestion of seeking specificity in a higher-order array is attractive, but Stoffregen & Bardy (S&B) fail to provide a compelling empirical basis to their claim that specificity exists solely in the global array. Using the example of relative motion, the alternate hypotheses that must be considered are presented.
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  11. Guy C. Van Orden, John G. Holden & Michael T. Turvey (2003). Self-Organization of Cognitive Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (3):331.
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  12. Guy C. Van Orden & Marian A. Jansen op de Haar (2000). Schneider's Apraxia and the Strained Relation Between Experience and Description. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):247 – 259.
    Borrett, Kelly and Kwan [(2000) Phenomenology, dynamical neural networks and brain function, Philosophical Psychology, 13, 000-000] claim that unbiased, self-evident, direct description is possible, and may supply the data that brain theories account for. Merleau-Ponty's [(1962) Phenomenology of perception, London: Routledge] description of Schneider's apraxia is offered as a case in point. According to the authors, Schneider's apraxia justifies brain components of (...)
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  13. Guy C. Van Orden & Marian A. Jansen op de Haar (2000). Schneider's Apraxia and the Strained Relation Between Experience and Description. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):247-259.
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  14. Johannes C. Ziegler & Guy C. Van Orden (2000). Feedback Consistency Effects. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):351-352.
    Models are not adequately evaluated simply by whether they capture the data, after the fact. Other criteria are needed. One criterion is parsimony; but utility and generality are at least as important. Even with respect to parsimony, however, the case against feedback is not as straightforward as Norris et al. present it. We use feedback consistency effects to illustrate these points.
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