Search results for 'Gyrus Cinguli' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stanislas Dehaene, Michel Kerszberg & Jean-Pierre Changeux (2001). A Neuronal Model of a Global Workspace in Effortful Cognitive Tasks. Pnas 95 (24):14529-14534.score: 60.0
  2. Christopher D. Frith (2002). Attention to Action and Awareness of Other Minds. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):481-487.score: 60.0
  3. A. Etkin, T. Egner & R. Kalisch (2011). Emotional Processing in Anterior Cingulate and Medial Prefrontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):85-93.score: 60.0
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  4. Frederique De Vignemont & Tania Singer (2006). The Empathic Brain: How, When and Why? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):435-441.score: 60.0
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  5. G. Northoff & F. Bermpohl (2004). Cortical Midline Structures and the Self. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):102-107.score: 60.0
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  6. M. F. Rushworth, M. E. Walton, S. W. Kennerley & D. M. Bannerman (2004). Action Sets and Decisions in the Medial Frontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):410-417.score: 60.0
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  7. P. C. Fletcher, F. Happé, U. Frith, S. C. Baker, R. J. Dolan, R. S. Frackowiak & C. D. Frith (1995). Other Minds in the Brain: A Functional Imaging Study of "Theory of Mind" in Story Comprehension. Cognition 57 (2):109-128.score: 60.0
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  8. Yi-Yuan Tang, Mary K. Rothbart & Michael I. Posner (2012). Neural Correlates of Establishing, Maintaining, and Switching Brain States. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (6):330.score: 60.0
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  9. Matthew M. Botvinick, Jonathan D. Cohen & Cameron S. Carter (2004). Conflict Monitoring and Anterior Cingulate Cortex: An Update. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (12):539-546.score: 60.0
    One hypothesis concerning the human dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is that it functions, in part, to signal the occurrence of conflicts in information processing, thereby triggering compensatory adjustments in cognitive control. Since this idea was first proposed, a great deal of relevant empirical evidence has accrued. This evidence has largely corroborated the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, and some very recent work has provided striking new support for the theory. At the same time, other findings have posed specific challenges, especially concerning the (...)
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  10. William D. S. Killgore & Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd (2007). Unconscious Processing of Facial Affect in Children and Adolescents. Social Neuroscience 2 (1):28-47.score: 60.0
  11. Fred M. Levin & Colwyn Trevarthen (2000). Subtle is the Lord: The Relationship Between Consciousness, the Unconscious, and the Executive Control Network (ECN) of the Brain. Annual of Psychoanalysis 28:105-125.score: 60.0
     
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  12. M. F. Rushworth, T. E. Behrens, P. H. Rudebeck & M. E. Walton (2007). Contrasting Roles for Cingulate and Orbitofrontal Cortex in Decisions and Social Behaviour. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):168-176.score: 60.0
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  13. Thomas Dierks Philipp Homan, Jochen Kindler, Martinus Hauf, Sebastian Walther, Daniela Hubl (2013). Repeated Measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow in the Left Superior Temporal Gyrus Reveal Tonic Hyperactivity in Patients with Auditory Verbal Hallucinations: A Possible Trait Marker. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Background: The left superior temporal gyrus (STG) has been suggested to play a key role in auditory verbal hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Eleven medicated subjects with schizophrenia and medication-resistant auditory verbal hallucinations and 19 healthy controls underwent perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling. Three additional repeated measurements were conducted in the patients. Patients underwent a treatment with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) between the first 2 measurements. The main outcome measure was the pooled cerebral blood flow (...)
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  14. C. Mathys, P. Loui, X. Zheng & G. Schlaug (2010). Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Applied to Heschl's Gyrus Modulates Pitch Discrimination. Frontiers in Psychology 1:193-193.score: 24.0
    The neural basis of the human brain's ability to discriminate pitch has been investigated by functional neuroimaging and the study of lesioned brains, indicating the critical importance of right and left Heschl's gyrus (HG) in pitch perception. Nonetheless, there remains some uncertainty with regard to localization and lateralization of pitch discrimination, partly because neuroimaging results do not allow us to draw inferences about the causality. To address the problem of causality in pitch discrimination functions, we used transcranial direct current (...)
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  15. Maarten A. S. Boksem Mattie Tops (2011). A Potential Role of the Inferior Frontal Gyrus and Anterior Insula in Cognitive Control, Brain Rhythms, and Event-Related Potentials. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    In the present paper, we review evidence for of a model in which the inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula area (IFG/AI) is involved in elaborate attentional and working memory processing and we present the hypothesis that this processing may take different forms and may have different effects, depending on the task at hand: 1. it may facilitate fast and accurate responding, or 2. it may cause slow responding when prolonged elaborate processing is required to increase accuracy of responding, or 3. (...)
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  16. A. Morin, Self-Awareness and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Inner Speech Use During Self-Related Processing.score: 18.0
    To test the hypothesis of a participation of inner speech in self-referential activity we reviewed 59 studies measuring brain activity during processing of self-information in the following self-domains: agency, self-recognition, emotions, personality traits, autobiographical memory, preference judgments, and REST. The left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) has been shown to sustain inner speech use. We calculated the percentage of studies reporting LIFG activity for each self-dimension. 55.9% of all studies reviewed identified LIFG (and presumably inner speech) activity during self-awareness tasks. (...)
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  17. Magdalena Wiktoria Wiktoria Sliwinska, Manali Khadilkar, Jonathon Campbell-Ratcliffe, Frances Quevenco & Joseph T. Devlin (2012). Early and Sustained Supramarginal Gyrus Contributions to Phonological Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Reading is a surprisingly difficult task that, at a minimum, requires recognizing a visual stimulus and linking it with its corresponding sound and meaning. Neurologically, this involves an anatomically distributed set of brain regions cooperating to solve the problem. It has been hypothesized that the supramarginal gyrus (SMG) contributes preferentially to phonological aspects of word processing and thus plays an important role in visual word recognition. Here, we used chronometric transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the functional specificity and (...)
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  18. Alan G. Sanfey Alessandro Grecucci, Cinzia Giorgetta, Nicolao Bonini (2013). Reappraising Social Emotions: The Role of Inferior Frontal Gyrus, Temporo-Parietal Junction and Insula in Interpersonal Emotion Regulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Previous studies have reported the effect of emotion regulation strategies on both individual and social decision making, however the effect of regulation on socially driven emotions independent of decisions is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the neural effects of using reappraisal to both up- and down-regulate socially driven emotions. Participants played the Dictator Game in the role of recipient while undergoing fMRI, and concurrently applied the strategies of either up-regulation (reappraising the proposer’s intentions as more negative), down-regulation (...)
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  19. Nicholas B. Turk-Browne, Samuel V. Norman-Haignere & Gregory McCarthy (2010). Face-Specific Resting Functional Connectivity Between the Fusiform Gyrus and Posterior Superior Temporal Sulcus. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:176.score: 18.0
    Faces activate specific brain regions in fMRI, including the fusiform gyrus (FG) and the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS). The fact that the FG and pSTS are frequently co-activated suggests that they may interact synergistically in a distributed face processing network. Alternatively, the functions implemented by these regions may be encapsulated from each other. It has proven difficult to evaluate these two accounts during visual processing of face stimuli. However, if the FG and pSTS interact during face processing, the (...)
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  20. Laurie A. Stowe (2000). Sentence Comprehension and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Storage, Not Computation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):51-51.score: 18.0
    Neuroimaging evidence suggests that the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) supports temporary storage of linguistic material during linguistic tasks rather than computing a syntactic representation. The LIFG is not activated by simple sentences but by complex sentences and maintenance of word lists. Under this hypothesis, agrammatism should only disturb comprehension for constructions in which storage is essential.
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  21. Oshin Vartanian, Peter J. Kwantes, David R. Mandel, Fethi Bouak, Ann Nakashima, Ingrid Smith & Quan Lam (2013). Right Inferior Frontal Gyrus Activation as a Neural Marker of Successful Lying. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    There is evidence to suggest that successful lying necessitates cognitive effort. We tested this hypothesis by instructing participants to lie or tell the truth under conditions of high and low working memory (WM) load. The task required participants to register a response on 80 trials of identical structure within a 2 (WM Load: high, low) × 2 (Instruction: truth or lie) repeated-measures design. Participants were less accurate and responded more slowly when WM load was high, and also when they lied. (...)
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  22. Alain Morin & J. Michaud, Self-Awareness and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Selective Involvement of Inner Speech in Self-Related Processes.score: 15.0
     
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  23. Linden D. (2008). Anatomical Abnormalities of Heschl Gyrus in Schizophrenia Patients and Unaffected Relatives. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 15.0
  24. Giuseppe Di Pellegrino (2001). Superior Temporal Gyrus: A Neglected Cortical Area? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (8):330.score: 15.0
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  25. N. George (1998). Attention to Faces in the Fusiform Gyrus. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (6):205.score: 15.0
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  26. William D. Hopkins, Maria Misiura, Lisa A. Reamer, Jennifer A. Schaeffer, Mary C. Mareno & Steven J. Schapiro (2014). Poor Receptive Joint Attention Skills Are Associated with Atypical Gray Matter Asymmetry in the Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus of Chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes). Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 15.0
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  27. Hester Robert (2012). Evidence for Functionally Distinct Regions of the Right Inferior Frontal Gyrus During Motivationally-Modulated Inhibitory Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 15.0
  28. Bradley R. Buchsbaum, Gregory Hickok & Colin Humphries (2001). Role of Left Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus in Phonological Processing for Speech Perception and Production. Cognitive Science 25 (5):663-678.score: 15.0
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  29. F. A. Elliott (1969). The Corpus Callosum, Cingulate Gyrus, Septum Pellucidum, Septal Area and Fornix. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland. 2--758.score: 15.0
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  30. Bruce D. McCandliss, Laurent Cohen & Stanislas Dehaene (2003). The Visual Word Form Area: Expertise for Reading in the Fusiform Gyrus. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):293-299.score: 15.0
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  31. T. Nichols (1999). Face Up to the Fusiform Gyrus. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (11):409.score: 15.0
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  32. Mattie Tops & Maarten As Boksem (2011). A Potential Role of the Inferior Frontal Gyrus and Anterior Insula in Cognitive Control, Brain Rhythms, and Event-Related Potentials. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 15.0
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  33. Shen Tu, Jiang Qiu, Ulla Martens & Qinglin Zhang (2013). Category-Selective Attention Modulates Unconscious Processes in the Middle Occipital Gyrus. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):479-485.score: 15.0
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  34. Thomas Busigny Bruno Rossion, Laurence Dricot, Rainer Goebel (2010). Holistic Face Categorization in Higher Order Visual Areas of the Normal and Prosopagnosic Brain: Toward a Non-Hierarchical View of Face Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 9.0
    How a visual stimulus is initially categorized as a face in a network of human brain areas remains largely unclear. Hierarchical neuro-computational models of face perception assume that the visual stimulus is first decomposed in local parts in lower order visual areas. These parts would then be combined into a global representation in higher order face-sensitive areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. Here we tested this view in fMRI with visual stimuli that are categorized as faces based on their global configuration (...)
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  35. Esther Alonso Prieto, Stephanie Caharel, Richard N. Henson & Bruno Rossion (2011). Early (N170/M170) Face-Sensitivity Despite Right Lateral Occipital Brain Damage in Acquired Prosopagnosia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:138.score: 9.0
    Compared to objects, pictures of faces elicit a larger early electromagnetic response at occipito-temporal sites on the human scalp, with an onset of 130 ms and a peak at about 170 ms. This N170 face effect is larger in the right than the left hemisphere and has been associated with the early categorization of the stimulus as a face. Here we tested whether this effect can be observed in the absence of some of the visual areas showing a preferential response (...)
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  36. David I. Leitman, Daniel H. Wolf, J. Daniel Ragland, Petri Laukka, James Loughead, Jeffrey N. Valdez, Daniel C. Javitt, Bruce Turetsky & Ruben Gur (2010). "It's Not What You Say, but How You Say It": A Reciprocal Temporo-Frontal Network for Affective Prosody. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 9.0
    Humans communicate emotion vocally by modulating acoustic cues such as pitch, intensity and voice quality. Research has documented how the relative presence or absence of such cues alters the likelihood of perceiving an emotion, but the neural underpinnings of acoustic cue-dependent emotion perception remain obscure. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in 20 subjects we examined a reciprocal circuit consisting of superior temporal cortex, amygdala and inferior frontal gyrus that may underlie affective prosodic comprehension. Results showed that increased saliency of (...)
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  37. Roy Hamilton, Martin Wiener, Daniel Drebing & Branch Coslett (2013). Gone in a Flash: Manipulation of Audiovisual Temporal Integration Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 9.0
    While converging evidence implicates the right inferior parietal lobule in audiovisual integration, its role has not been fully elucidated by direct manipulation of cortical activity. Replicating and extending an experiment initially reported by Kamke, Vieth, Cottrell, and Mattingley (2012), we employed the sound-induced flash illusion, in which a single visual flash, when accompanied by two auditory tones, is misperceived as multiple flashes (Wilson, 1987; Shams, et al., 2000). Slow repetitive (1Hz) TMS administered to the right angular gyrus, but not (...)
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  38. Tokiko Harada, Donna J. Bridge & Joan Y. Chiao (2012). Dynamic Social Power Modulates Neural Basis of Math Calculation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 9.0
    Both situational (e.g., perceived power) and sustained social factors (e.g., cultural stereotypes) are known to affect how people academically perform, particularly in the domain of mathematics. The ability to compute even simple mathematics, such as addition, relies on distinct neural circuitry within the inferior parietal and inferior frontal lobes, brain regions where magnitude representation and addition are performed. Despite prior behavioral evidence of social influence on academic performance, little is known about whether or not temporarily heightening a person’s sense of (...)
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  39. Jasmeet P. Hayes, Rajendra A. Morey, Christopher M. Petty, Srishti Seth, Moria J. Smoski, Gregory Mccarthy & Kevin S. LaBar (2010). Staying Cool When Things Get Hot: Emotion Regulation Modulates Neural Mechanisms of Memory Encoding. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:230.score: 9.0
    During times of emotional stress, individuals often engage in emotion regulation to reduce the experiential and physiological impact of negative emotions. Interestingly, emotion regulation strategies also influence memory encoding of the event. Cognitive reappraisal is associated with enhanced memory while expressive suppression is associated with impaired explicit memory of the emotional event. However, the mechanism by which these emotion regulation strategies affect memory is unclear. We used event-related fMRI to investigate the neural mechanisms that give rise to memory formation during (...)
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  40. Brenda Rapp Jeremy J. Purcell, Peter E. Turkeltaub, Guinevere F. Eden (2011). Examining the Central and Peripheral Processes of Written Word Production Through Meta-Analysis. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 9.0
    Producing written words requires “central” cognitive processes (such as orthographic long-term and working memory) as well as more peripheral processes responsible for generating the motor actions needed for producing written words in a variety of formats (handwriting, typing, etc.). In recent years, various functional neuroimaging studies have examined the neural substrates underlying the central and peripheral processes of written word production. This study provides the first quantitative meta-analysis of these studies by applying Activation Likelihood Estimation methods (Turkeltaub et al., 2002). (...)
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  41. Kerstin H. Kipp, Bertram Opitz, Martina Becker, Juliane Hofmann, Christoph Krick, Ludwig Gortner & Axel Mecklinger (2012). Neural Correlates of Recognition Memory in Children with Febrile Seizures: Evidence From Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:17-17.score: 9.0
    Febrile seizures (FS) are assumed to not have adverse long-term effects on cognitive development. Nevertheless, FS are often associated with hippocampal sclerosis which can imply episodic memory deficits. This interrelation has hardly been studied so far. In the current study 13 children who had suffered from FS during infancy and 14 control children (7–9 years old) were examined for episodic and semantic memory with standardized neuropsychological tests. Furthermore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we studied neuronal activation while the children (...)
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  42. Franz Ebner Roland H. Grabner, Gernot Reishofer, Karl Koschutnig (2011). Brain Correlates of Mathematical Competence in Processing Mathematical Representations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 9.0
    The ability to extract numerical information from different representation formats (e.g., equations, tables, or diagrams) is a key component of mathematical competence but little is known about its neural correlate. Previous studies comparing mathematically less and more competent adults have focused on mental arithmetic and reported differences in left angular gyrus activity which were interpreted to reflect differential reliance on arithmetic fact retrieval during problem solving. The aim of the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate (...)
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  43. Liina Pylkkänen Douglas K. Bemis (2012). Combination Across Domains: An MEG Investigation Into the Relationship Between Mathematical, Pictorial, and Linguistic Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 9.0
    Debates surrounding the evolution of language often hinge upon its relationship to cognition more generally and many investigations have attempted to demark the boundary between the two. Though results from these studies suggest that language may recruit domain-general mechanisms during certain types of complex processing, the domain-generality of basic combinatorial mechanisms that lie at the core of linguistic processing is still unknown. Our previous work (Bemis & Pylkkänen, 2011, 2012) used magnetoencephalography to isolate neural activity associated with the simple composition (...)
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  44. Axel Mecklinger Kerstin H. Kipp, Bertram Opitz, Martina Becker, Juliane Hofmann, Christoph Krick, Ludwig Gortner (2012). Neural Correlates of Recognition Memory in Children with Febrile Seizures: Evidence From Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 9.0
    Febrile seizures (FS) are assumed to not have adverse long-term effects on cognitive development. Nevertheless, FS are often associated with hippocampal sclerosis which can imply episodic memory deficits. This interrelation has hardly been studied so far. In the current study 13 children who had suffered from FS during infancy and 14 control children (7–9 years old) were examined for episodic and semantic memory with standardized neuropsychological tests. Furthermore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we studied neuronal activation while the children (...)
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  45. Marie Postma-Nilsenová & Eric Postma (2013). Auditory Perception Bias in Speech Imitation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 9.0
    In an experimental study, we explored the role of auditory perception bias in vocal pitch imitation. In line with neuroanatomical differences in the lateral Heschl's gyrus, some listeners show an auditory perception bias for the sound as a whole which facilitates their perception of the fundamental frequency (the primary acoustic correlate of pitch). Other listeners focus on the harmonic constituents of the complex sound signal which may hamper the perception of the fundamental. These two listener types are referred to (...)
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  46. K. Suzanne Scherf, Beatriz Luna, Nancy Minshew & Marlene Behrmann (2010). Location, Location, Location: Alterations in the Functional Topography of Face- but Not Object- or Place-Related Cortex in Adolescents with Autism. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 9.0
    In autism, impairments in face processing are a relatively recent discovery, but have quickly become a widely accepted aspect of the behavioral profile. Only a handful of studies have investigated potential atypicalities in autism in the development of the neural substrates mediating face processing. High-functioning individuals with autism (HFA) and matched typically developing (TD) controls watched dynamic movie vignettes of faces, common objects, buildings, and scenes of navigation while undergoing an fMRI scan. With these data, we mapped the functional topography (...)
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  47. Joseph F. X. DeSouza Shima Ovaysikia, Khalid A. Tahir, Jason L. Chan (2010). Word Wins Over Face: Emotional Stroop Effect Activates the Frontal Cortical Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 9.0
    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been implicated in higher order cognitive control of behaviour. Sometimes such control is executed through suppression of an unwanted response in order to avoid conflict. Conflict occurs when two simultaneously competing processes lead to different behavioral outcomes, as seen in tasks such as the anti-saccade, go/no-go and the Stroop task. We set out to examine whether different types of stimuli in a modified emotional Stroop task would cause similar interference effects as the original Stroop-colour/word, and (...)
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  48. Joan Y. Chiao Tokiko Harada, Donna J. Bridge (2012). Dynamic Social Power Modulates Neural Basis of Math Calculation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 9.0
    Both situational (e.g., perceived power) and sustained social factors (e.g., cultural stereotypes) are known to affect how people academically perform, particularly in the domain of mathematics. The ability to compute even simple mathematics, such as addition, relies on distinct neural circuitry within the inferior parietal and inferior frontal lobes, brain regions where magnitude representation and addition are performed. Despite prior behavioral evidence of social influence on academic performance, little is known about whether or not temporarily heightening a person’s sense of (...)
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  49. Feiyan Chen Yongxin Li, Yunqi Wang, Yuzheng Hu, Yurong Liang (2013). Structural Changes in Left Fusiform Areas and Associated Fiber Connections in Children with Abacus Training: Evidence From Morphometry and Tractography. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
    Evidence supports the notion that the fusiform gyrus (FG), as an integral part of the ventral occipitotemporal junction, is involved widely in cognitive processes as perceiving faces, objects, places or words, and this region also might represent the visual form of an abacus in the abacus-based mental calculation process. The current study uses a combined voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis to test whether long-term abacus training could induce structural changes in the left FG and in (...)
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  50. Isabelle Buard, Sally J. Rogers, Susan Hepburn, Eugene Kronberg & Donald C. Rojas (2013). Altered Oscillation Patterns and Connectivity During Picture Naming in Autism. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 6.0
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