Search results for 'Gyrus Cinguli' (try it on Scholar)

44 found
Order:
  1.  68
    Frederique De Vignemont & Tania Singer (2006). The Empathic Brain: How, When and Why? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):435-441.
  2.  6
    Matthew M. Botvinick, Jonathan D. Cohen & Cameron S. Carter (2004). Conflict Monitoring and Anterior Cingulate Cortex: An Update. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (12):539-546.
    One hypothesis concerning the human dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is that it functions, in part, to signal the occurrence of conflicts in information processing, thereby triggering compensatory adjustments in cognitive control. Since this idea was first proposed, a great deal of relevant empirical evidence has accrued. This evidence has largely corroborated the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, and some very recent work has provided striking new support for the theory. At the same time, other findings have posed specific challenges, especially concerning the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   44 citations  
  3. M. F. Rushworth, M. E. Walton, S. W. Kennerley & D. M. Bannerman (2004). Action Sets and Decisions in the Medial Frontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):410-417.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  4. Stanislas Dehaene, Michel Kerszberg & Jean-Pierre Changeux (2001). A Neuronal Model of a Global Workspace in Effortful Cognitive Tasks. Pnas 95 (24):14529-14534.
  5.  10
    G. Northoff & F. Bermpohl (2004). Cortical Midline Structures and the Self. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):102-107.
  6.  4
    P. C. Fletcher, F. Happé, U. Frith, S. C. Baker, R. J. Dolan, R. S. Frackowiak & C. D. Frith (1995). Other Minds in the Brain: A Functional Imaging Study of "Theory of Mind" in Story Comprehension. Cognition 57 (2):109-128.
  7. Christopher D. Frith (2002). Attention to Action and Awareness of Other Minds. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):481-487.
    We have only limited awareness of the system by which we control our actions and this limited awareness does not seem to be concerned with the control of action. Awareness of choosing one action rather than another comes after the choice has been made, while awareness of initiating an action occurs before the movement has begun. These temporal differences bind together in consciousness the intention to act and the consequences of the action. This creates our sense of agency. Activity in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  8.  9
    A. Etkin, T. Egner & R. Kalisch (2011). Emotional Processing in Anterior Cingulate and Medial Prefrontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):85-93.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  9.  2
    Yi-Yuan Tang, Mary K. Rothbart & Michael I. Posner (2012). Neural Correlates of Establishing, Maintaining, and Switching Brain States. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (6):330.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  10. M. F. Rushworth, T. E. Behrens, P. H. Rudebeck & M. E. Walton (2007). Contrasting Roles for Cingulate and Orbitofrontal Cortex in Decisions and Social Behaviour. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):168-176.
    There is general acknowledgement that both the anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex are implicated in reinforcement-guided decision making, and emotion and social behaviour. Despite the interest that these areas generate in both the cognitive neuroscience laboratory and the psychiatric clinic, ideas about the distinctive contributions made by each have only recently begun to emerge. This reflects an increasing understanding of the component processes that underlie reinforcement- guided decision making, such as the representation of reinforcement expectations, the exploration, updating and representation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  11. William D. S. Killgore & Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd (2007). Unconscious Processing of Facial Affect in Children and Adolescents. Social Neuroscience 2 (1):28-47.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Fred M. Levin & Colwyn Trevarthen (2000). Subtle is the Lord: The Relationship Between Consciousness, the Unconscious, and the Executive Control Network (ECN) of the Brain. Annual of Psychoanalysis 28:105-125.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  74
    A. Morin & J. Michaud (2007). Self-Awareness and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Inner Speech Use During Self-Related Processing. Brain Research Bulletin 74 (6):387-396.
    To test the hypothesis of a participation of inner speech in self-referential activity we reviewed 59 studies measuring brain activity during processing of self-information in the following self-domains: agency, self-recognition, emotions, personality traits, autobiographical memory, preference judgments, and REST. The left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) has been shown to sustain inner speech use. We calculated the percentage of studies reporting LIFG activity for each self-dimension. 55.9% of all studies reviewed identified LIFG (and presumably inner speech) activity during self-awareness tasks. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  14.  1
    Laurie A. Stowe (2000). Sentence Comprehension and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Storage, Not Computation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):51-51.
    Neuroimaging evidence suggests that the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) supports temporary storage of linguistic material during linguistic tasks rather than computing a syntactic representation. The LIFG is not activated by simple sentences but by complex sentences and maintenance of word lists. Under this hypothesis, agrammatism should only disturb comprehension for constructions in which storage is essential.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15. Shen Tu, Jiang Qiu, Ulla Martens & Qinglin Zhang (2013). Category-Selective Attention Modulates Unconscious Processes in the Middle Occipital Gyrus. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):479-485.
    Many studies have revealed the top-down modulation on unconscious processing. However, there is little research about how category-selective attention could modulate the unconscious processing. In the present study, using functional magnetic resonance imaging , the results showed that category-selective attention modulated unconscious face/tool processing in the middle occipital gyrus . Interestingly, MOG effects were of opposed direction for face and tool processes. During unconscious face processing, activation in MOG decreased under the face-selective attention compared with tool-selective attention. This result (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Bruce D. McCandliss, Laurent Cohen & Stanislas Dehaene (2003). The Visual Word Form Area: Expertise for Reading in the Fusiform Gyrus. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):293-299.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  17.  1
    Bradley R. Buchsbaum, Gregory Hickok & Colin Humphries (2001). Role of Left Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus in Phonological Processing for Speech Perception and Production. Cognitive Science 25 (5):663-678.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  18. Alain Morin & J. Michaud, Self-Awareness and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Selective Involvement of Inner Speech in Self-Related Processes.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  1
    N. George (1998). Attention to Faces in the Fusiform Gyrus. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (6):205.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  1
    Giuseppe Di Pellegrino (2001). Superior Temporal Gyrus: A Neglected Cortical Area? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (8):330.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. F. A. Elliott (1969). The Corpus Callosum, Cingulate Gyrus, Septum Pellucidum, Septal Area and Fornix. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland 2--758.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. T. Nichols (1999). Face Up to the Fusiform Gyrus. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (11):409.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Barbara Tomasino, Fabio Campanella & Franco Fabbro (2016). Medial Orbital Gyrus Modulation During Spatial Perspective Changes: Pre- Vs. Post-8weeks Mindfulness Meditation. Consciousness and Cognition 40:147-158.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  11
    M. Bar (2007). The Proactive Brain: Using Analogies and Associations to Generate Predictions. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (7):280-289.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  25.  7
    A. Mayes, D. Montaldi & E. Migo (2007). Associative Memory and the Medial Temporal Lobes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):126-135.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  26. Tamara Christie & Virginia Slaughter (2010). Movement Contributes to Infants' Recognition of the Human Form. Cognition 114 (3):329-337.
    Three experiments demonstrate that biological movement facilitates young infants’ recognition of the whole human form. A body discrimination task was used in which 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old infants were habituated to typical human bodies and then shown scrambled human bodies at the test. Recovery of interest to the scrambled bodies was observed in 9- and 12-month-old infants in Experiment 1, but only when the body images were animated to move in a biologically possible way. In Experiment 2, nonbiological movement was (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  14
    Elizabeth A. Hoffman, M. Ida Gobbini & James V. Haxby (2000). The Distributed Human Neural System for Face Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (6):223-233.
    Face perception, perhaps the most highly developed visual skill in humans, is mediated by a distributed neural system in humans that is comprised of multiple, bilateral regions. We propose a model for the organization of this system that emphasizes a distinction between the representation of invariant and changeable aspects of faces. The representation of invariant aspects of faces underlies the recognition of individuals, whereas the representation of changeable aspects of faces, such as eye gaze, expression, and lip movement, underlies the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   59 citations  
  28. Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard (2001). Synaesthesia: A Window Into Perception, Thought and Language. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (12):3-34.
    (1) The induced colours led to perceptual grouping and pop-out, (2) a grapheme rendered invisible through ‘crowding’ or lateral masking induced synaesthetic colours — a form of blindsight — and (3) peripherally presented graphemes did not induce colours even when they were clearly visible. Taken collectively, these and other experiments prove conclusively that synaesthesia is a genuine percep- tual phenomenon, not an effect based on memory associations from childhood or on vague metaphorical speech. We identify different subtypes of number–colour synaesthesia (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   48 citations  
  29.  70
    Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard (2001). Psychophysical Investigations Into the Neural Basis of Synaesthesia. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, B 268:979-983.
    We studied two otherwise normal, synaesthetic subjects who `saw' a speci¢c colour every time they saw a speci¢c number or letter. We conducted four experiments in order to show that this was a genuine perceptual experience rather than merely a memory association. (i)The synaesthetically induced colours could lead to perceptual grouping, even though the inducing numerals or letters did not. (ii)Synaesthetically induced colours were not experienced if the graphemes were presented peripherally. (iii)Roman numerals were ine¡ective: the actual number grapheme was (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  30. Adrian G. Guggisberg, Sarang S. Dalal, Armin Schnider & Srikantan S. Nagarajan (2011). The Neural Basis of Event-Time Introspection. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1899-1915.
    We explored the neural mechanisms allowing humans to report the subjective onset times of conscious events. Magnetoencephalographic recordings of neural oscillations were obtained while human subjects introspected the timing of sensory, intentional, and motor events during a forced choice task. Brain activity was reconstructed with high spatio-temporal resolution. Event-time introspection was associated with specific neural activity at the time of subjective event onset which was spatially distinct from activity induced by the event itself. Different brain regions were selectively recruited for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  31.  3
    Pengmin Qin, Georg Northoff, Timothy Lane & et al (2016). Spontaneous Activity in Default-Mode Network Predicts Ascriptions of Self-Relatedness to Stimuli. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience:xx-yy.
    Spontaneous activity levels prior to stimulus presentation can determine how that stimulus will be perceived. It has also been proposed that such spontaneous activity, particularly in the default-mode network (DMN), is involved in self-related processing. We therefore hypothesised that pre-stimulus activity levels in the DMN predict whether a stimulus is judged as self-related or not. Method: Participants were presented in the MRI scanner with a white noise stimulus that they were instructed contained their name or another. They then had to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  10
    Timothy L. Hodgson, Lisa J. Smith, Paul Anand & Abdelmalek Benattayallah, An fMRI Investigation of Moral Cognition in Healthcare Decision Making.
    This study used fMRI to investigate the neural substrates of moral cognition in health resource allocation decision problems. In particular, it investigated the cognitive and emotional processes that underpin utilitarian approaches to health care rationing such as Quality Adjusted Life Years. Participants viewed hypothetical medical and nonmedical resource allocation scenarios which described equal or unequal allocation of resources to different groups. In addition, participants were assigned to 1 of 2 treatments in which they either did or did not receive advanced (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  20
    Henrik Walter (2012). Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Empathy: Concepts, Circuits, and Genes. Emotion Review 4 (1):9-17.
    This article reviews concepts of, as well as neurocognitive and genetic studies on, empathy. Whereas cognitive empathy can be equated with affective theory of mind, that is, with mentalizing the emotions of others, affective empathy is about sharing emotions with others. The neural circuits underlying different forms of empathy do overlap but also involve rather specific brain areas for cognitive (ventromedial prefrontal cortex) and affective (anterior insula, midcingulate cortex, and possibly inferior frontal gyrus) empathy. Furthermore, behavioral and imaging genetic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    Mary K. Rothbart, Brad E. Sheese, M. Rosario Rueda & Michael I. Posner (2011). Developing Mechanisms of Self-Regulation in Early Life. Emotion Review 3 (2):207-213.
    Children show increasing control of emotions and behavior during their early years. Our studies suggest a shift in control from the brain’s orienting network in infancy to the executive network by the age of 3—4 years. Our longitudinal study indicates that orienting influences both positive and negative affect, as measured by parent report in infancy. At 3—4 years of age, the dominant control of affect rests in a frontal brain network that involves the anterior cingulate gyrus. Connectivity of brain (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  14
    Angela D. Friederici & D. Yves von Cramon (2000). Syntax in the Brain: Linguistic Versus Neuroanatomical Specificity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):32-33.
    We criticize the lack of neuroanatomical precision in the Grodzinsky target article. We propose a more precise neuroanatomical characterization of syntactic processing and suggest that syntactic procedures are supported by the left frontal operculum in addition to the anterior part of the superior temporal gyrus, which appears to be associated with syntactic knowledge representation.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  6
    Ying Gao & Hao Zhang (2014). Unconscious Processing Modulates Creative Problem Solving: Evidence From an Electrophysiological Study. Consciousness and Cognition 26:64-73.
    Previous behavioral studies have identified the significant role of subliminal cues in creative problem solving. However, neural mechanisms of such unconscious processing remain poorly understood. Here we utilized an event-related potential approach and sandwich mask technique to investigate cerebral activities underlying the unconscious processing of cues in creative problem solving. College students were instructed to solve divergent problems under three different conditions . Our data showed that creative problem solving can benefit from unconscious cues, although not as much as from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  4
    John D. Sinden, Helen Hodges & Jeffrey A. Gray (1995). Neural Transplantation and Recovery of Cognitive Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):10-35.
    Cognitive deficits were produced in rats by different methods of damaging the brain: chronic ingestion of alcohol, causing widespread damage to diffuse cholinergic and aminergic projection systems; lesions (by local injection of the excitotoxins, ibotenate, quisqualate, and AMPA) of the nuclei of origin of the forebrain cholinergic projection system (FCPS), which innervates the neocortex and hippocampal formation; transient cerebral ischaemia, producing focal damage especially in the CA1 pyramidal cells of the dorsal hippocampus; and lesions (by local injection of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  12
    Goulven Josse & Nathalie Tzourio-Mazoyer (2003). What Functional Imaging of the Human Brain Can Tell About Handedness and Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):228-229.
    Anatomo-functional studies in humans point out that handedness and language-related functional laterality are not correlated – except during language production; and that the convergence of language and hand control is located in the precentral gyrus, whereas executive functions required by movement imitation and phonological and semantic processing converge onto Broca's area. Multiple domains are likely to be actors in language evolution. Footnotes1 Nathalie Tzourio-Mazoyer is the corresponding author for this commentary.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  13
    Lucia M. Vaina (1990). Common Functional Pathways for Texture and Form Vision: A Single Case Study. Synthese 83 (1):93-131.
    A single case study of a patient, D.M., with a lesion in the region of the right occipito-temporal gyrus is presented. D.M. had well-preserved language and general cognitive abilities. Colour discrimination, contrast sensitivity, gross depth perception, spatial localization, and motion appreciation were within normal limits.On the evaluation of perceptual abilities, he failed to identify two-dimensional shapes from stereoscopic vision, motion, and texture although in all cases he was able to identify the rough area subtended by the shape. These findings (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  8
    A. Heinzel, H. Hautzel, T. Poeppel, F. Boers, M. Beu & H. Mueller (2008). Neural Correlates of Subliminal and Supraliminal Letter Processing—An Event-Related fMRI Study. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):699-713.
    One problem of interpreting research on subconscious processing is the possibility that participants are weakly conscious of the stimuli. Here, we compared the fMRI BOLD response in healthy adults to clearly visible single letters with the response to letters presented in the absence of any behavioural evidence of visibility . No letter catch trials served as a control condition. Forced-choice responses did not differ from chance when letter-to-background contrast was low, whereas they were almost 100% correct when contrast was high. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. V. S. Ramachandran, Apraxia, Metaphor and Mirror Neurons.
    Summary Ideomotor apraxia is a cognitive disorder in which the patient loses the ability to accurately perform learned, skilled actions. This is despite normal limb power and coordination. It has long been known that left supramarginal gyrus lesions cause bilateral upper limb apraxia and it was proposed that this area stored a visualkinaesthetic image of the skilled action, which was translated elsewhere in the brain into the pre-requisite movement formula. We hypothesise that, rather than these two functions occurring separately, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Hillary S. Schaefer & Andrew L. Alexander R. Richard J. Davidson, : Gaze Fixation and the Neural Circuitry of Face Processing.
    ai Diminished gaze fixation is one of the core features of autism and has been proposed to be associated with abnormalities in the neural circuitry of affect. We tested this hypothesis in two separate studies using eye tracking while measuring functional brain activity during facial discrimination tasks in individuals with autism and in typically developing individuals. Activation in the fusiform gyrus and amygdala was strongly and positively correlated with the time spent fixating the eyes in the autistic group in (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  1
    Glenn E. Meyer (2002). Single Cells in the Visual System and Images Past. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):200-201.
    Various techniques have attempted to localize imagery. However, early findings using single cell recordings of human receptive fields during imagery tasks have had little impact. Reports by Marg and his coworkers (1968) found no evidence for imagery in human Area 17, 18, and 19. Single cells from humans suggest later imagery-related activity in hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  5
    John D. Newman (2004). Infant Crying and Colic: What Lies Beneath. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):470-471.
    The neural structures implicated in crying are reviewed, based on studies in animals. Brain regions involved include the anterior cingulate gyrus (a cortical structure), amygdala, thalamic tegmentum, periaqueductal gray of the midbrain, and the nucleus ambiguus of the caudal brainstem. It is hypothesized that the crying associated with colic may be a manifestation of differing developmental stages in the brain circuits involved.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography