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Harold I. Brown [82]Harold Chapman Brown [69]Harvey R. Brown [44]Hunter Brown [20]
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Profile: Hugh Brown (Virginia Tech)
Profile: Heather Brown (Waubonsee Community College)
Profile: Hayley Brown (Butler University)
Profile: Holly Brown (University of Ghent)
Profile: Haines Brown
  1.  31
    Harvey R. Brown & James Read, Clarifying Possible Misconceptions in the Foundations of General Relativity.
    We discuss what we take to be three possible misconceptions in the foundations of general relativity, relating to: the interpretation of the weak equivalence principle and the relationship between gravity and inertia; the connection between gravitational redshift results and spacetime curvature; and the Einstein equivalence principle and the ability to ``transform away" gravity in local inertial coordinate systems.
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  2.  48
    Harvey Brown & D. E. Rowe, The Role of Rods and Clocks in General Relativity and the Meaning of the Metric Field.
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  3. Harvey R. Brown & Oliver Pooley (2006). Minkowski Space-Time: A Glorious Non-Entity. In Dennis Dieks (ed.), The Ontology of Spacetime. Elsevier 67--89.
    It is argued that Minkowski space-time cannot serve as the deep structure within a ``constructive'' version of the special theory of relativity, contrary to widespread opinion in the philosophical community.
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  4. Harold Chapman Brown (1909). The Eighth Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (2):44-51.
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  5.  6
    Harold I. Brown (1988). Rationality. Routledge.
  6.  68
    Larry Laudan, Arthur Donovan, Rachel Laudan, Peter Barker, Harold Brown, Jarrett Leplin, Paul Thagard & Steve Wykstra (1986). Scientific Change: Philosophical Models and Historical Research. Synthese 69 (2):141 - 223.
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  7.  38
    Dennis Lehmkuhl, P. Ghose & Harvey Brown, Einstein, the Reality of Space, and the Action-Reaction Principle.
    Einstein regarded as one of the triumphs of his 1915 theory of gravity - the general theory of relativity - that it vindicated the action-reaction principle, while Newtonian mechanics as well as his 1905 special theory of relativity supposedly violated it. In this paper we examine why Einstein came to emphasise this position several years after the development of general relativity. Several key considerations are relevant to the story: the connection Einstein originally saw between Mach's analysis of inertia and both (...)
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  8.  19
    Harvey R. Brown & James Read, Three Common Misconceptions in General Relativity.
    We highlight and resolve what we take to be three common misconceptions in general relativity, relating to the interpretation of the weak equivalence principle and the relationship between gravity and inertia; the connection between gravitational redshift results and spacetime curvature; and the strong equivalence principle and the local recovery of special relativity in curved, dynamical spacetime.
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  9.  88
    Harold I. Brown (1989). Book Review: Educating Reason. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (4):509-512.
  10. Katherine Brading & Harvey R. Brown (2004). Are Gauge Symmetry Transformations Observable? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):645-665.
    In a recent paper in the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Kosso discussed the observational status of continuous symmetries of physics. While we are in broad agreement with his approach, we disagree with his analysis. In the discussion of the status of gauge symmetry, a set of examples offered by ’t Hooft has influenced several philosophers, including Kosso; in all cases the interpretation of the examples is mistaken. In this paper we present our preferred approach to the empirical (...)
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  11. Oliver Pooley & Harvey R. Brown (2002). Relationalism Rehabilitated? I: Classical Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (2):183--204.
    The implications for the substantivalist–relationalist controversy of Barbour and Bertotti's successful implementation of a Machian approach to dynamics are investigated. It is argued that in the context of Newtonian mechanics, the Machian framework provides a genuinely relational interpretation of dynamics and that it is more explanatory than the conventional, substantival interpretation. In a companion paper (Pooley [2002a]), the viability of the Machian framework as an interpretation of relativistic physics is explored. 1 Introduction 2 Newton versus Leibniz 3 Absolute space versus (...)
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  12.  32
    Harvey R. Brown & Christopher Gordon Timpson, Bell on Bell's Theorem: The Changing Face of Nonlocality.
    Between 1964 and 1990, the notion of nonlocality in Bell's papers underwent a profound change as his nonlocality theorem gradually became detached from quantum mechanics, and referred to wider probabilistic theories involving correlations between separated beables. The proposition that standard quantum mechanics is itself nonlocal became divorced from the Bell theorem per se from 1976 on, although this important point is widely overlooked in the literature. In 1990, the year of his death, Bell would express serious misgivings about the mathematical (...)
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  13.  27
    Harold I. Brown (1977). Perception, Theory, and Commitment: The New Philosophy of Science. Precedent Pub..
    " --Maurice A. Finocchiaro,Isis "The best and most original aspect of the book is its overall conception.
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  14.  77
    Harvey R. Brown & Jos Uffink (2001). The Origins of Time-Asymmetry in Thermodynamics: The Minus First Law. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (4):525-538.
    This paper investigates what the source of time-asymmetry is in thermodynamics, and comments on the question whether a time-symmetric formulation of the Second Law is possible.
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  15.  48
    Katherine Brading & Harvey R. Brown (2004). Are Gauge Symmetry Transformations Observable? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):645-665.
    In a recent paper in this journal, Kosso ([2000]) discussed the observational status of continuous symmetries of physics. While we are in broad agreement with his approach, we disagree with his analysis. In the discussion of the status of gauge symmetry, a set of examples offered by 't Hooft ([1980]) has influenced several philosophers, including Kosso; in all cases the interpretation of the examples is mistaken. In this paper, we present our preferred approach to the empirical significance of symmetries, re-analysing (...)
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  16.  28
    Harvey R. Brown, The Theory of the Rise of Sap in Trees: Some Historical and Conceptual Remarks.
    The ability of trees to suck water from roots to leaves, sometimes to heights of over a hundred meters, is remarkable given the absence of any mechanical pump. This study deals with a number of issues, of both an historical and conceptual nature, in the orthodox ``Cohesion-Tension'' theory of the ascent of sap in trees. The theory relies chiefly on the exceptional cohesive and adhesive properties of water, the structural properties of trees, and the role of evaporation from leaves. But (...)
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  17. Harvey R. Brown & Roland Sypel (1995). On the Meaning of the Relativity Principle and Other Symmetries. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 9 (3):235 – 253.
    Abstract The historical evolution of the principle of relativity from Galileo to Einstein is briefly traced, and purported difficulties with Einstein's formulation of the principle are examined and dismissed. This formulation is then compared to a precise version formulated recently in the geometrical language of spacetime theories. We claim that the recent version is both logically puzzling and fails to capture a crucial physical insight contained in the earlier formulations. The implications of this claim for the modern treatment of general (...)
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  18. Harvey R. Brown & Oliver Pooley (2001). The Origins of the Spacetime Metric: Bell's Lorentzian Pedagogy and its Significance in General Relativity. In Craig Callender & Nick Huggett (eds.), Physics Meets Philosophy at the Plank Scale. Cambridge University Press 256--72.
    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the `Lorentzian Pedagogy' defended by J.S. Bell in his essay ``How to teach special relativity'', and to explore its consistency with Einstein's thinking from 1905 to 1952. Some remarks are also made in this context on Weyl's philosophy of relativity and his 1918 gauge theory. Finally, it is argued that the Lorentzian pedagogy---which stresses the important connection between kinematics and dynamics---clarifies the role of rods and clocks in general relativity.
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  19.  37
    Hunter Brown (2013). Incarnation and the Divine Hiddenness Debate. Heythrop Journal 54 (2):252-260.
    This paper examines the debate that has arisen in connection with J. L. Schellenberg's work on divine hiddenness. It singles out as especially deserving of attention Paul Moser's proposal that the debate distinguish more clearly between classical theism and Hebraic theisms. This worthwhile proposal, I argue, will be unlikely to exert its full potential influence upon the debate unless certain features of Christian incarnation belief are recognized and addressed in connection with it.
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  20. Katherine Bracing & Harvey R. Brown (2003). Symmetries and Noether's Theorems. In Katherine A. Brading & Elena Castellani (eds.), Symmetries in Physics: Philosophical Reflections. Cambridge University Press 89.
     
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  21.  45
    Jeeva Anandan & Harvey R. Brown (1995). On the Reality of Space-Time Geometry and the Wavefunction. Foundations of Physics 25 (2):349--60.
    The action-reaction principle (AR) is examined in three contexts: (1) the inertial-gravitational interaction between a particle and space-time geometry, (2) protective observation of an extended wave function of a single particle, and (3) the causal-stochastic or Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. A new criterion of reality is formulated using the AR principle. This criterion implies that the wave function of a single particle is real and justifies in the Bohm interpretation the dual ontology of the particle and its associated wave (...)
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  22.  4
    Harold I. Brown (forthcoming). Philosophy of Science Circa 1950–2000: Some Things We Learned. Diogenes:0392192116640719.
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  23.  82
    H. I. Brown (1980). The Paradigm Paradigm and Related Notions. Diogenes 28 (112):111-136.
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  24.  64
    Harvey R. Brown & Peter Holland, Dynamical Versus Variational Symmetries: Understanding Noether's First Theorem.
    It is argued that awareness of the distinction between dynamical and variational symmetries is crucial to understanding the significance of Noether's 1918 work. Specific attention is paid, by way of a number of striking examples, to Noether's first theorem, which establishes a correlation between dynamical symmetries and conservation principles.
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  25.  34
    Rick A. Adams, Harriet R. Brown & Karl J. Friston (2015). Bayesian Inference, Predictive Coding and Delusions. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3:51-88.
    This paper considers psychotic symptoms in terms of false inferences or beliefs. It is based on the notion that the brain is an organ of inference that actively constructs hypotheses to explain or predict its sensations. This perspective provides a normative account of action and perception that emphasises probabilistic representations; in particular, the confidence or precision of beliefs about the world. We consider sensory attenuation deficits, catatonia and delusions as various expressions of the same core pathology: namely, an aberrant encoding (...)
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  26.  77
    H. I. Brown (1982). Self-Reference in Logic and Mulligan Stew. Diogenes 30 (118):121-142.
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  27.  53
    Harvey R. Brown & Rom Harré (eds.) (1988). Philosophical Foundations of Quantum Field Theory. Oxford University Press.
    Quantum field theory, one of the most rapidly developing areas of contemporary physics, is full of problems of great theoretical and philosophical interest. This collection of essays is the first systematic exploration of the nature and implications of quantum field theory. The contributors discuss quantum field theory from a wide variety of standpoints, exploring in detail its mathematical structure and metaphysical and methodological implications.
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  28.  75
    F. Barone, A. O. Barut, E. Beltrametti, S. Bergia, R. A. Bertlmann, H. R. Brown, G. C. Ghirardi, D. M. Greenberger, D. Home & M. Jammer (1991). Bell's Theorem and the Foundations of Modern Physics. Foundations of Physics 21 (8).
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  29.  70
    Harold I. Brown (1987). Observation And Objectivity. Oxford University Press.
    This book develops an explanation for the roles of observation and theory in scientific endeavor that occupies the middle ground between empiricism and rationalism, and captures the strengths of both approaches. Brown argues that philosophical theories have the same epistemological status as scientific theories and constructs an epistemological theory that provides an account of the role that theory and instruments play in scientific observation. His theory of perception yields a new analysis of objectivity that combines the traditional view of observation (...)
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  30.  21
    Harvey Brown (1999). Aspects of Objectivity in Quantum Mechanics. In Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.), From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 45--70.
    The purpose of the paper is to explore different aspects of the covariance of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. First, doubts are expressed concerning the claim that gauge fields can be 'generated' by way of imposition of gauge covariance of the single-particle wave equation. Then a brief review is given of Galilean covariance in the general case of external fields, and the connection between Galilean boosts and gauge transformations. Under time-dependent translations the geometric phase associated with Schrödinger evolution is non-invariant, and the (...)
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  31.  65
    Harold I. Brown (1993). A Theory-Laden Observation Can Test the Theory. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (3):555-559.
  32.  97
    Harvey R. Brown (1997). On the Role of Special Relativity in General Relativity. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (1):67 – 81.
    The existence of a definite tangent space structure (metric with Lorentzian signature) in the general theory of relativity is the consequence of a fundamental assumption concerning the local validity of special relativity. There is then at the heart of Einstein's theory of gravity an absolute element which depends essentially on a common feature of all the non-gravitational interactions in the world, and which has nothing to do with space-time curvature. Tentative implications of this point for the significance of the vacuum (...)
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  33. Harvey R. Brown (1990). Does the Principle of Relativity Imply Winnie's (1970) Equal Passage Times Principle? Philosophy of Science 57 (2):313-324.
    The kinematical principle of Equal Passage Times (EPT) was introduced by Winnie in his 1970 derivation of the relativistic coordinate transformations compatible with arbitrary synchrony conventions in one-dimensional space. In this paper, the claim by Winnie and later Giannoni that EPT is a direct consequence of the relativity principle is questioned. It is shown that EPT, given Einstein's 1905 postulates, is equivalent to the relativistic (synchrony independent) clock retardation principle, and that for standard synchrony it reduces to an isotropy condition (...)
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  34.  15
    Harvey R. Brown (1986). The Insolubility Proof of the Quantum Measurement Problem. Foundations of Physics 16 (9):857-870.
    Modern insolubility proofs of the measurement problem in quantum mechanics not only differ in their complexity and degree of generality, but also reveal a lack of agreement concerning the fundamental question of what constitutes such a proof. A systematic reworking of the (incomplete) 1970 Fine theorem is presented, which is intended to go some way toward clarifying the issue.
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  35. Harvey Brown & David Wallace (2005). Solving the Measurement Problem: De Broglie-Bohm Loses Out to Everett. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 35 (4):517-540.
    The quantum theory of de Broglie and Bohm solves the measurement problem, but the hypothetical corpuscles play no role in the argument. The solution finds a more natural home in the Everett interpretation.
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  36.  51
    Harold I. Brown (2005). Incommensurability Reconsidered. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (1):149-169.
    In his later writings Kuhn reconsidered his earlier account of incommensurability, clarifying some aspects, modifying others, and explicitly rejecting some of his earlier claims. In Kuhn’s new account incommensurability does not pose a problem for the rational evaluation of competing scientific theories, but does pose a problem for certain forms of realism. Kuhn maintains that, because of incommensurability, the notion that science might seek to learn the nature of things as they are in themselves is incoherent. I develop Kuhn’s new (...)
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  37. Harold I. Brown (1994). Reason, Judgement and Bayes's Law. Philosophy of Science 61 (3):351-369.
    This paper argues that when used judiciously Bayes's law has a role to play in the evaluation of scientific hypotheses. Several examples are presented in which a rational response to evidence requires a judgement whether to apply Bayes's law or whether, for example, to redistribute prior probabilities. The paper concludes that reflection on Bayes's law illustrates how an adequate account of the rational evaluation of hypotheses requires an account of judgement--a point which several philosophers have noted despite few attempts to (...)
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  38.  86
    H. R. Brown (1986). HENDRY, JOHN [1984]: The Creation of Quantum Mechanics and the Bohr-Pauli Dialogue. D. Reidel Publishing Company. Xi+177 Pp. (ISBN 9O-277-1648-X). [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 37 (4):497-506.
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  39.  44
    Harold I. Brown (2001). Incommensurability and Reality. In Paul Hoyningen-Huene & Howard Sankey (eds.), Incommensurability and Related Matters. Kluwer 123--142.
  40. Harold I. Brown (1986). Sellars, Concepts, and Conceptual Change. Synthese 68 (August):275-307.
    A major theme of recent philosophy of science has been the rejection of the empiricist thesis that, with the exception of terms which play a purely formal role, the language of science derives its meaning from some, possibly quite indirect, correlation with experience. The alternative that has been proposed is that meaning is internal to each conceptual system, that terms derive their meaning from the role they play in a language, and that something akin to "meaning" flows from conceptual framework (...)
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  41.  54
    Harvey R. Brown, Wayne Myrvold & Jos Uffink (2009). Boltzmann's H-Theorem, its Discontents, and the Birth of Statistical Mechanics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (2):174-191.
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  42. Harold Chapman Brown (1929). Advertising and Propaganda: A Study in the Ethics of Social Control. International Journal of Ethics 40 (1):39-55.
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  43.  67
    Harold I. Brown (1988). Normative Epistemology and Naturalized Epistemology. Inquiry 31 (1):53 – 78.
    A number of philosophers have argued that a naturalized epistemology cannot be normative, and thus that the norms that govern science cannot themselves be established empirically. Three arguments for this conclusion are here developed and then responded to on behalf of naturalized epistemology. The response is developed in three stages. First, if we view human knowers as part of the natural world, then the attempt to establish epistemic norms that are immune to scientific evaluation faces difficulties that are at least (...)
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  44.  49
    H. R. Brown & G. Svetlichny (1990). Nonlocality and Gleason's Lemma. Part I. Deterministic Theories. Foundations of Physics 20 (11):1379-1387.
    J. S. Bell's classic 1966 review paper on the foundations of quantum mechanics led directly to the Bell nonlocality theorem. It is not widely appreciated that the review paper contained the basic ingredients needed for a nonlocality result which holds in certain situations where the Bell inequality is not violated. We present in this paper a systematic formulation and evaluation of an argument due to Stairs in 1983, which establishes a nonlocality result based on the Bell-Kochen-Specker “paradox” in quantum mechanics.
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  45.  17
    Harvey R. Brown (2001). The Origins of Length Contraction: I. The Fitzgerald-Lorentz Deformation Hypothesis. American Journal of Physics 69:1044-1054.
    One of the widespread confusions concerning the history of the 1887 Michelson-Morley experiment has to do with the initial explanation of this celebrated null result due independently to FitzGerald and Lorentz. In neither case was a strict, longitudinal length contraction hypothesis invoked, as is commonly supposed. Lorentz postulated, particularly in 1895, any one of a certain family of possible deformation effects for rigid bodies in motion, including purely transverse alteration, and expansion as well as contraction; FitzGerald may well have had (...)
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  46.  23
    Harvey R. Brown, Michelson, Fitzgerald and Lorentz: The Origins of Relativity Revisited.
    It is argued that an unheralded moment marking the beginnings of relativity theory occurred in 1889, when G. F. FitzGerald, no doubt with the puzzling 1887 Michelson-Morley experiment fresh in mind, wrote to Heaviside about the possible effects of motion on inter-molecular forces in bodies. Emphasis is placed on the difference between FitzGerald's and Lorentz's independent justifications of the shape distortion effect involved. Finally, the importance of the their `constructive' approach to kinematics---stripped of any commitment to the physicality of the (...)
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  47.  61
    Andrew Elby, Harvey R. Brown & Sara Foster (1993). What Makes a Theory Physically “Complete”? Foundations of Physics 23 (7):971-985.
    Three claims about what makes a theory “physically complete” are (1) Shimony's assertion that a complete theory says “all there is to say” about nature; (2) EPR's requirement that a complete theory describe all “elements of reality”; and (3) Ballentine and Jarrett's claim that a “predictively complete” theory must obey a condition used in Bell deviations. After introducing “statistical completeness” as a partial formalization of (1), we explore the logical and motivational relationships connecting these completeness conditions. We find that statistical (...)
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  48.  11
    Gweneth Doane, Bernadette Pauly, Helen Brown & Gladys McPherson (2004). Exploring The Heart Ofethical Nursing Practice: Implications for Ethics Education. Nursing Ethics 11 (3):240-253.
    The limitations of rational models of ethical decision making and the importance of nurses’ human involvement as moral agents is increasingly being emphasized in the nursing literature. However, little is known about how nurses involve themselves in ethical decision making and action or about educational processes that support such practice. A recent study that examined the meaning and enactment of ethical nursing practice for three groups of nurses (nurses in direct care positions, student nurses, and nurses in advanced practice positions) (...)
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  49.  44
    Harold I. Brown (1983). Incommensurability. Inquiry 26 (1):3 – 29.
    The thesis that certain competing scientific theories are incommensurable was introduced by Kuhn and Feyerabend in 1962 and has been a subject of widespread critique. Critics have generally taken incommensurable theories to be theories which cannot be compared in a rational manner, but both Kuhn and Feyerabend have explicitly rejected this interpretation, and Feyerabend has discussed ways in which such comparisons can be made in a number of his writings. This paper attempts to clarify the incommensurability thesis through the examination (...)
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  50.  42
    Harold I. Brown (1988). Scientific Realism. International Studies in Philosophy 20 (3):130-131.
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