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  1. H. E. Emson (2003). It is Immoral to Require Consent for Cadaver Organ Donation. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (3):125-127.
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  2. H. E. Emson (1995). Rights, Duties, and Limits of Autonomy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (01):6-.
  3. H. E. Emson (1994). Minimal Breaches of Confidentiality in Health Care Research: A Canadian Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (3):165-168.
    In a large proportion of health care research based on the retrospective review of records, minimal breach of patient confidentiality appears to be inevitable. This occurs at initial identification of and access to the chart, selected on the basis of the condition under investigation, and while individual identifiability can be blocked at subsequent stages, at this point it does occur. Prospective individual consent is impractical because often neither the desirability nor the specific subject of the research is known at the (...)
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  4. H. E. Emson (1992). Rights, Duties and Responsibilities in Health Care. Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):3-11.
    The value of autonomy is generally stated to be of prime importance in relation to health care. Arising out of this, rights of the patient to and in health care have been extensively discussed and stated, and have found expression in law. There have been minimal statements of the rights of others involved in health care, such as caregivers, and minimal discussion of duties and responsibilities in relation to rights claimed and conferred. The author suggests that no claim to rights (...)
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  5. H. E. Emson (1988). Confidentiality: A Modified Value. Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (2):87-90.
    In its original expression as a medical value confidentiality may have been absolute; this concept has become eroded by patient consent, legal actions and change in the climate of public opinion. In particular requirements arising out of legal statutes and common law judgements have greatly modified the confidentiality of the doctor-patient relationship in societies deriving their law from English origins. Despite this, confidentiality remains a value which the physician must strive to preserve. He cannot however do this without considering its (...)
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  6. H. E. Emson (1987). The Ethics of Human Cadaver Organ Transplantation: A Biologist's Viewpoint. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):124-126.
    The rights of the various individuals involved in decision-making in cadaver organ donation are considered, and there is discussion of the relation of human cadavers to the planetary biomass. I conclude that the rights of the potential recipient should outweigh those of the other parties concerned and that education and legislation should recognise and promote this.
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