Search results for 'H. Mellor' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Hugh Mellor (Cambridge University)
  1.  34
    D. H. Mellor (1998). Transcendental Tense: D.H. Mellor. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):29–44.
    [D. H. Mellor] Kant's claim that our knowledge of time is transcendental in his sense, while false of time itself, is true of tenses, i.e. of the locations of events and other temporal entities in McTaggart's A series. This fact can easily, and I think only, be explained by taking time itself to be real but tenseless. /// [J. R. Lucas] Mellor's argument from Kant fails. The difficulties in his first Antinomy are due to topological confusions, not the (...)
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  2.  25
    D. H. Mellor, Interview with D. H. Mellor (1993).
    This article is the text of an interview with D. H. Mellor conducted by Andrew Pyle and first published in the Spring 1993 issue of the philosophical journal Cogito.
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  3.  24
    D. H. Mellor, Hallvard Lillehammer & Gonzalo Rodríguez Pereyra (eds.) (2003). Real Metaphysics: Essays in Honour of D.H. Mellor. Routledge.
    This text brings together a collection of new essays by a number of philosophers to honor Hugh Mellor's contribution to philosophy. The collection stands as an original exploration of some of the most central issues in philosophy.
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  4. Hallvard Lillehammer, Gonzalo Rodríguez Pereyra & D. H. Mellor (2003). Real Metaphysics Essays in Honour of D.H. Mellor.
     
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  5.  1
    D. H. Mellor (1969). God and Probability1: D. H. MELLOR. Religious Studies 5 (2):223-234.
    My object in this paper is to consider what relevance, if any, current analyses of probability have to problems of religious belief. There is no doubt that words such as ‘probable’ are used in this context; what is doubtful is that this use can be analysed as other major uses of such words can. I shall conclude that this use cannot be so analysed and hence, given the preponderance of the other uses that can, that it is misleading.
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  6. D. H. Mellor (1995). Cambridge Philosophers I: F. P. Ramsey1: D. H. Mellor. Philosophy 70 (272):243-262.
    Frank Plumpton Ramsey was born in February 1903, and he died in January 1930—just before his 27th birthday. In his short life he produced an extraordinary amount of profound and original work in economics, mathematics and logic as well as in philosophy: work which in all these fields is still, over sixty years on, extremely influential.
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  7. D. H. Mellor (1998). I–D.H. Mellor. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):29-43.
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  8. D. H. Mellor (1982). The Reduction of Society: D. H. Mellor. Philosophy 57 (219):51-75.
    How does the study of society relate to the study of the people it comprises? This longstanding question is partly one of method, but mainly one of fact, of how independent the objects of these two studies, societies and people, are. It is commonly put as a question of reduction, and I shall tackle it in that form: does sociology reduce in principle to individual psychology? I follow custom in calling the claim that it does ‘individualism’ and its denial ‘holism’.
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  9. D. H. Mellor (1998). Real Time Ii. Routledge.
    Real Time II extends and evolves D.H. Mellor's classic exploration of the philosophy of time, Real Time . This wholly new book answers such basic metaphysical questions about time as: how do past, present and future differ, how are time and space related, what is change, is time travel possible? His Real Time dominated the philosophy of time for fifteen years. This book will do the same for the next twenty years.
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  10.  63
    D. H. Mellor (1995). The Facts of Causation. Routledge.
    The Facts of Causation grapples with one of philosophy's most enduring issues. Causation is central to all of our lives. What we see and hear causes us to believe certain facts about the world. We need that information to know how to act and how to cause the effects we desire. D. H. Mellor, a leading scholar in the philosophy of science and metaphysics, offers a comprehensive theory of causation. Many questions about causation remain unsettled. In science, the indeterminism (...)
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  11.  33
    D. H. Mellor (2003). Real Metaphysics: Replies. In Hallvard Lillehammer & Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (eds.), Real Metaphysics: Essays in honour of D. H. Mellor. Routledge
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  12.  6
    D. H. Mellor (2012). Mind, Meaning, and Reality: Essays in Philosophy. OUP Oxford.
    Mind, Meaning, and Reality presents fifteen philosophical papers in which D. H. Mellor explores some of the most intriguing questions in philosophy. These include: what determines what we think, and what we use language to mean; how that depends on what there is in the world and why there is only one universe; and the nature of time.
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  13. D. H. Mellor (ed.) (1990). F. P. Ramsey: Philosophical Papers. Cambridge University Press.
    Frank Ramsey was the greatest of the remarkable generation of Cambridge philosophers and logicians which included G. E. Moore, Bertrand Russell, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Maynard Keynes. Before his tragically early death in 1930 at the age of twenty-six, he had done seminal work in mathematics and economics as well as in logic and philosophy. This volume, with a new and extensive introduction by D. H. Mellor, contains all Ramsey's previously published writings on philosophy and the foundations of mathematics. The (...)
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  14.  34
    D. H. Mellor (1998). Transcendental Tense. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):29 - 56.
    [D. H. Mellor] Kant's claim that our knowledge of time is transcendental in his sense, while false of time itself, is true of tenses, i.e. of the locations of events and other temporal entities in McTaggart's A series. This fact can easily, and I think only, be explained by taking time itself to be real but tenseless. /// [J. R. Lucas] Mellor's argument from Kant fails. The difficulties in his first Antinomy are due to topological confusions, not the (...)
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  15. D. H. Mellor (2004). Probability: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.
    _Probability: A Philosophical Introduction_ introduces and explains the principal concepts and applications of probability. It is intended for philosophers and others who want to understand probability as we all apply it in our working and everyday lives. The book is not a course in mathematical probability, of which it uses only the simplest results, and avoids all needless technicality. The role of probability in modern theories of knowledge, inference, induction, causation, laws of nature, action and decision-making makes an understanding of (...)
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  16.  21
    D. H. Mellor, Frank Ramsey: A Biography.
    The article is derived from the accompanying radio portrait. It was published in 1995 in Philosophy 70, 243-262, and is reproduced here by permission of the Editor. Page numbers after quotations from Ramsey refer to F. P. Ramsey: Philosophical Papers, edited by D. H. Mellor, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.
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  17.  12
    I. Hinkfuss & D. H. Mellor (1997). The Facts of Causation. Philosophical Books 38 (1):1-11.
    Everything we do relies on causation. We eat and drink because this causes us to stay alive. Courts tell us who causes crimes, criminology tell us what causes people to commit them. D.H. Mellor shows us that to understand the world and our lives we must understand causation. The Facts of Causation , now available in paperback, is essential reading for students and for anyone interested in reading one of the ground-breaking theories in metaphysics. We cannot understand the world (...)
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  18. D. H. Mellor (2012). Mind, Meaning, and Reality: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Mind, Meaning, and Reality contains fifteen philosophical papers by D. H. Mellor. The first Part is about how the ways we are disposed to act fix both what we believe and what we use language to mean. Part II is about what there is: the reality of dispositions; what makes beliefs and sentences true; why there is only one universe; and how social groups, and other things composed of parts, are related to the people and other things that constitute (...)
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  19. D. H. Mellor (2007). Matters of Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.
    This selection of D. H. Mellor's work demonstrates the wide ranging originality of his work. It gathers together sixteen major papers on related topics. Together they form a complete modern metaphysics. The first five papers are on aspects of the mind: on our 'selves', their supposed subjectivity and how we refer to them, on the nature of conscious belief and on computational and physicalist theories of the mind. The next five papers deal with dispositions, natural kinds, laws of nature (...)
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  20. D. H. Mellor (2002). The Facts of Causation. Routledge.
    Everything we do relies on causation. We eat and drink because this causes us to stay alive. Courts tell us who causes crimes, criminology tell us what causes people to commit them. D.H. Mellor shows us that to understand the world and our lives we must understand causation. _The Facts of Causation_, now available in paperback, is essential reading for students and for anyone interested in reading one of the ground-breaking theories in metaphysics. We cannot understand the world and (...)
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  21. D. H. Mellor (1998). The Facts of Causation. Routledge.
    Everything we do relies on causation. We eat and drink because this causes us to stay alive. Courts tell us who causes crimes, criminology tell us what causes people to commit them. D.H. Mellor shows us that to understand the world and our lives we must understand causation. _The Facts of Causation_, now available in paperback, is essential reading for students and for anyone interested in reading one of the ground-breaking theories in metaphysics. We cannot understand the world and (...)
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  22.  43
    Frank Plumpton Ramsey & D. H. Mellor (eds.) (1980). Prospects for Pragmatism: Essays in Memory of F. P. Ramsey. Cambridge University Press.
    Haack, S. Is truth flat or bumpy?--Chihara, C. S. Ramsey 's theory of types.--Loar, B. Ramsey 's theory of belief and truth.--Skorupski, J. Ramsey on Belief.--Hookway, C. Inference, partial belief, and psychological laws.--Skyrms, B. Higher order degrees of belief.--Mellor, D. H. Consciousness and degrees of belief.--Blackburn, S. Opinions and chances.--Grandy, R. E. Ramsey, reliability, and knowledge.--Cohen, L. J. The problem of natural laws.--Giedymin, J. Hamilton's method in geometrical optics and Ramsey 's view of theories.
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  23. D. H. Mellor (1981). Real Time. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of the nature of time. In it, redeploying an argument first presented by McTaggart, the author argues that although time itself is real, tense is not. He accounts for the appearance of the reality of tense - our sense of the passage of time, and the fact that our experience occurs in the present - by showing how time is indispensable as a condition of action. Time itself is further analysed, and Dr Mellor gives answers (...)
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  24. D. H. Mellor (2002). Real Time Ii. Routledge.
    _Real Time II_ extends and evolves DH Mellor's classic exploration of the philosophy of time,_Real Time._ This new book answers such basic metaphysical questions about time as: how do past, present and future differ, how are time and space related, what is change, is time travel possible? His _Real Time_ dominated the philosophy of time for fifteen years. _Real TIme II_ will do the same for the next twenty. GET /english/edu/Studying_at_SU/History_of_Literature.html HTTP/1.0.
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  25. D. H. Mellor (2004). The Matter of Chance. Cambridge University Press.
    This book deals not so much with statistical methods as with the central concept of chance, or statistical probability, which statistical theories apply to nature.
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  26. Tim Crane & D. H. Mellor (1990). There is No Question of Physicalism. Mind 99 (394):185-206.
    Many philosophers are impressed by the progress achieved by physical sciences. This has had an especially deep effect on their ontological views: it has made many of them physicalists. Physicalists believe that everything is physical: more precisely, that all entities, properties, relations, and facts are those which are studied by physics or other physical sciences. They may not all agree with the spirit of Rutherford's quoted remark that 'there is physics; and there is stamp-collecting',' but they all grant physical science (...)
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  27.  19
    D. H. Mellor (2005). Probability: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.
    This book: * assumes no mathematical background and keeps the technicalities to a minimum * explains the most important applications of probability theory to ...
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  28.  68
    D. H. Mellor (2009). Truthmakers for What? In Heather Dyke (ed.), From Truth to Reality: New Essays in Logic and Metaphysics.
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  29. D. H. Mellor (1974). In Defense of Dispositions. Philosophical Review 83 (2):157-181.
  30.  27
    D. H. Mellor (1978). Conscious Belief. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 78 (March):87-101.
  31.  7
    D. H. Mellor (ed.) (1980). Prospects for Pragmatism. Cambridge University Press.
    SUSAN HAACK . . . if we believe pq to the extent of iand pq to the extent of i, we are bound in consistency to believe p also to the degree of i . . . but ...
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  32.  38
    D. H. Mellor (1991). Matters of Metaphysics. Cambridge Univ Pr.
    Together they form a complete modern metaphysics. The book starts with the mind: the subjectivity of the self, consciousness, how like computers we are, and how psychology relates to physics.
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  33. D. H. Mellor (1977). Natural Kinds. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 28 (4):299-312.
  34. David H. Mellor (2004). For Facts as Causes and Effects. In Ned Hall, L. A. Paul & John Collins (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press 309--23.
     
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  35.  43
    D. H. Mellor (1993). How to Believe a Conditional. Journal of Philosophy 60 (5):233-248.
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  36.  68
    D. H. Mellor (2006). Wholes and Parts: The Limits of Composition. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):138-145.
    The paper argues that very different part-whole relations hold between different kinds of entities. While these relations share most of their formal properties, they need not share all of them. Nor need other mereological principles be true of all kinds of part–whole pairs. In particular, it is argued that the principle of unrestricted composition, that any two or more entities have a mereological sum, while true of sets and propositions, is false of things and events.
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  37.  31
    D. H. Mellor (1970). Index 1950-69 Volumes 1-20. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 21 (1):1-80.
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  38. D. H. Mellor (1968). Two Fallacies in Charles Taylor's Explanation of Behaviour. Mind 77 (305):124-126.
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  39. D. H. Mellor (1990). Laws, Chances and Properties. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 4 (2):159 – 170.
    Abstract The paper develops a unified account of both deterministic and indeterministic laws of nature which inherits the merits but not the defects of the best existing accounts. As in Armstrong's account, laws are embodied in facts about universals; but not in higher?order relations between them, and the necessity of laws is not primitive but results from their containing chances of 0 or 1. As in the Ramsey?Lewis account, law statements would be the general axioms and theorems of the simplest (...)
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  40.  30
    D. H. Mellor (2008). Micro-Composition. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83 (62):65-80.
    Entities of many kinds, not just material things, have been credited with parts. Armstrong , for example, has taken propositions and properties to be parts of their conjunctions, sets to be parts of sets that include them, and geographical regions and events to be parts of regions and events that contain them. The justification for bringing all these diverse relations under a single ‘part–whole’ concept is that they share all or most of the formal features articulated in mereology . But (...)
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  41.  59
    D. H. Mellor (1986). Tense's Tenseless Truth Conditions. Analysis 46 (4):167 - 172.
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  42. D. H. Mellor & Alex Oliver (eds.) (1997). Properties. Oxford University Press.
    When we say a certain rose is red, we seem to be attributing a property, redness, to it. But are there really such properties? If so, what are they like, how do we know about them, and how are they related to the objects which have them and the linguistic devices which we use to talk about them? This collection presents these ancient problems in a modern light. In particular, it makes accessible for the first time the most important contributions (...)
     
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  43.  90
    D. H. Mellor (1974). Special Relativity and Present Truth. Analysis 34 (3):74 - 77.
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  44. D. H. Mellor (1988). Crane's Waterfall Illusion. Analysis 48 (June):147-50.
  45.  96
    D. H. Mellor (2000). The Point of Refinement. Analysis 60 (267):243–246.
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  46.  46
    D. H. Mellor (2000). Possibility, Chance and Necessity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (1):16 – 27.
  47. D. H. Mellor (2000). Equally Effective Causes. Analysis 60 (265):71–73.
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  48.  65
    D. H. Mellor (1992). There Are No Conjunctive Universals. Analysis 52 (2):97 - 103.
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  49.  51
    D. H. Mellor (2013). Probability in the Philosophy of Religion. Analysis 73 (3):548-554.
  50.  33
    Hallvard Lillehammer & D. H. Mellor (eds.) (2005). Ramsey's Legacy. Oxford University Press.
    The Cambridge philosopher Frank Ramsey died tragically in 1930 at the age of 26, but had already established himself as one of the most brilliant minds of the twentieth century. Besides groundbreaking work in philosophy, particularly in logic, language, and metaphysics, he created modern decision theory and made substantial contributions to mathematics and economics. In these original essays, written to commemorate the centenary of Ramsey's birth, a distinguished international team of contributors offer fresh perspectives on his work and show its (...)
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