14 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Helen Nissenbaum [11]H. Nissenbaum [3]
  1. Finn Brunton & Helen Nissenbaum (2013). Political and Ethical Perspectives on Data Obfuscation. In Mireille Hildebrandt & Katja De Vries (eds.), Privacy, Due Process and the Computational Turn. Routledge. 171.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. M. Flanagan, D. Howe & H. Nissenbaum (2008). Embodying Values in Design: Theory and Practice. In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 322--353.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Mary Flanagan, Daniel Howe & Helen Nissenbaum (2008). Embodying Values in Technology: Theory and Practice. In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 322--353.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Yochai Benkler & Helen Nissenbaum (2006). Commons-Based Peer Production and Virtue. Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (4):394–419.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Helen Nissenbaum (2005). Where Computer Security Meets National Security. Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):61-73.
    This paper identifies two conceptions of security in contemporary concerns over the vulnerability of computers and networks to hostile attack. One is derived from individual-focused conceptions of computer security developed in computer science and engineering. The other is informed by the concerns of national security agencies of government as well as those of corporate intellectual property owners. A comparative evaluation of these two conceptions utilizes the theoretical construct of “securitization,”developed by the Copenhagen School of International Relations.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. William A. Galston, Thomas C. Hilde, Lucas D. Introna, Peter Levine, Eric M. Uslaner, Helen Nissenbaum & Robert Wachbroit (2004). The Internet in Public Life. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Helen Nissenbaum (2001). Editorial. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (4).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Helen Nissenbaum (1999). Editorial. Ethics and Information Technology 1 (3).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jeroen van den Hoven, Lucas Introna, Deborah Johnson, Helen Nissenbaum & Herman Tavani (1999). Coordinating Editor. Ethics and Information Technology 1:89-92.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. H. Nissenbaum (1998). Protecting Privacy in an Information Age: The Problem of Privacy in Public. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 17 (s 5-6):559-596.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Helen Nissenbaum (1998). The Cutting Edge. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (1):38-39.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. H. Nissenbaum (1997). Rob Kling (Ed.) Computerization and Controversy: Value Conflicts and Social Choices. Minds and Machines 7:152-155.
  13. Helen Nissenbaum (1997). Toward an Approach to Privacy in Public: Challenges of Information Technology. Ethics and Behavior 7 (3):207 – 219.
    This article highlights a contemporary privacy problem that falls outside the scope of dominant theoretical approaches. Although these approaches emphasize the connection between privacy and a protected personal (or intimate) sphere, many individuals perceive a threat to privacy in the widespread collection of information even in realms normally considered "public". In identifying and describing the problem of privacy in public, this article is preliminary work in a larger effort to map out future theoretical directions.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Helen Nissenbaum (1996). Accountability in a Computerized Society. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (1):25-42.
    This essay warns of eroding accountability in computerized societies. It argues that assumptions about computing and features of situations in which computers are produced create barriers to accountability. Drawing on philosophical analyses of moral blame and responsibility, four barriers are identified: 1) the problem of many hands, 2) the problem of bugs, 3) blaming the computer, and 4) software ownership without liability. The paper concludes with ideas on how to reverse this trend.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation