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  1.  67
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (1996). The Foundations of Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
    The book challenges the values of much of contemporary bioethics and health care policy by confronting their failure to secure the moral norms they seek to apply.
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  2.  48
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (2011). Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultants: In Search of Professional Status in a Post-Modern World. HEC Forum 23 (3):129-145.
    The American Society for Bioethics and the Humanities (ASBH) issued its Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation just as it is becoming ever clearer that secular ethics is intractably plural and without foundations in any reality that is not a social–historical construction (ASBH Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation , 2nd edn. American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, Glenview, IL, 2011 ). Core Competencies fails to recognize that the ethics of health care ethics consultants is not ethics in (...)
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  3.  20
    Mark J. Cherry & H. Tristram Engelhardt (2004). Informed Consent in Texas: Theory and Practice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):237 – 252.
    The legal basis of informed consent in Texas may on first examination suggest an unqualified affirmation of persons as the source of authority over themselves. This view of individuals in the practice of informed consent tends to present persons outside of any social context in general and outside of their families in particular. The actual functioning of law and medical practice in Texas, however, is far more complex. This study begins with a brief overview of the roots of Texas law (...)
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  4.  9
    H. T. Engelhardt (2014). The Recent History of Christian Bioethics Critically Reassessed. Christian Bioethics 20 (2):146-167.
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  5.  13
    H. T. Engelhardt (forthcoming). Courage: Facing and Living with Moral Diversity. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):278-280.
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  6.  17
    H. T. Engelhardt (2010). Beyond the Best Interests of Children: Four Views of the Family and of Foundational Disagreements Regarding Pediatric Decision Making. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):499-517.
    This paper presents four different understandings of the family and their concomitant views of the authority of the family in pediatric medical decision making. These different views are grounded in robustly developed, and conflicting, worldviews supported by disparate basic premises about the nature of morality. The traditional worldviews are often found within religious communities that embrace foundational metaphysical premises at odds with the commitments of the liberal account of the family dominant in the secular culture of the West. These disputes (...)
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  7.  13
    H. T. Engelhardt (2015). A New Theological Framework for Roman Catholic Bioethics: Pope Francis Makes a Significant Change in the Moral Framework for Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 21 (1):130-134.
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  8. H. T. Engelhardt (1980). Editor's Note. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (4):277-277.
    Even though since 1965 the Great Cultural Revolution was basically an internal struggle in Mainland China, it coincided with a high tide of criticism toward Russian revisionism and therefore constituted a struggle for defining the ideological line of the Chinese Communist Party. As an internal struggle, the Great Cultural Revolution subjected all phases of cultural activity and personnel to a severe political grinding down so that a more uniform political consciousness of Maoism was generated as the guiding principle of the (...)
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  9.  29
    H. T. Engelhardt (2011). Confronting Moral Pluralism in Posttraditional Western Societies: Bioethics Critically Reassessed. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (3):243-260.
    In the face of the moral pluralism that results from the death of God and the abandonment of a God's eye perspective in secular philosophy, bioethics arose in a context that renders it essentially incapable of giving answers to substantive moral questions, such as concerning the permissibility of abortion, human embryonic stem cell research, euthanasia, etc. Indeed, it is only when bioethics understands its own limitations and those of secular moral philosophy in general can it better appreciate those tasks that (...)
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  10. H. Tristram Engelhardt & Stuart F. Spicker (eds.) (1975). Evaluation and Explanation in the Biomedical Sciences: Proceedings of the First Trans-Disciplinary Symposium on Philosophy and Medicine, Held at Galveston, May 9-11, 1974. [REVIEW] D. Reidel Pub. Co..
     
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  11.  19
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2012). Bioethics Critically Reconsidered: Living After Foundations. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):97-105.
    Given intractable moral pluralism, what ought one to make of the bioethics that arose in the early 1970s, grounded as it was in the false assumption that there is a common secular morality that secular bioethics ought to apply? It is as if bioethics developed without recognition of the crisis at the heart of secular morality itself. Secular moral rationality cannot of itself provide the foundations to identify a particular morality and its bioethics as canonical. One is not just confronted (...)
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  12.  49
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (1991). Bioethics and Secular Humanism: The Search for a Common Morality. Trinity Press International.
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  13.  46
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1976). Ideology and Etiology. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1 (3):256-268.
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  14.  16
    H. T. Engelhardt (2012). Fair Equality of Opportunity Critically Reexamined: The Family and the Sustainability of Health Care Systems. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (6):583-602.
    A complex interaction of ideological, financial, social, and moral factors makes the financial sustainability of health care systems a challenge across the world. One difficulty is that some of the moral commitments of some health care systems collide with reality. In particular, commitments to equality in access to health care and to fair equality of opportunity undergird an unachievable promise, namely, to provide all with the best of basic health care. In addition, commitments to fair equality of opportunity are in (...)
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  15.  29
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (2011). Christian Bioethics After Christendom: Living in a Secular Fundamentalist Polity and Culture. Christian Bioethics 17 (1):64-95.
    The contemporary societies of the West are characterized by a collision of radically incommensurable cultures, that of traditional Christianity and that of the robustly laicist cultures that took shape in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, drawing not only on the French Revolution and the Western European Enlightenment but also on deep roots in the synthesis of faith and reason that framed the thirteenth-century Western Christian Middle ages. This article explores the foundational contrast and conflict between traditional Christian bioethics and the (...)
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  16.  28
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (2002). The Ordination of Bioethicists as Secular Moral Experts. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):59-82.
    The philosophy of medicine cum bioethics has become the socially recognized source for moral and epistemic direction in health-care decision-making. Over the last three decades, this field has been accepted politically as an authorized source of guidance for policy and law. The field's political actors have included the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, the President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical (...)
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  17.  18
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (2002). Consensus Formation: The Creation of an Ideology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):7-16.
    Bioethics is not merely a theoretical discipline but a practice as well. Indeed, bioethics is a sort of moral trade. Bioethicists serve on ethics committees, give expert testimony to courts, provide guidance for healthcare policy, and receive payment for these services. The difficulty is that their role as experts able to guide clinical choice and public policy formation is brought into question by the diversity of moral understandings regarding central moral issues at the heart of the culture wars in healthcare. (...)
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  18.  39
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (ed.) (2006). Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus. M & M Scrivener Press.
    This collection of essays, Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus, deals with the issue of the repeated failure of attempts to derive a universal set of ...
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  19.  7
    H. T. Engelhardt (2007). Long-Term Care: The Family, Post-Modernity, and Conflicting Moral Life-Worlds. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (5):519-536.
    Long-term care is controversial because it involves foundational disputes. Some are moral-economic, bearing on whether the individual, the family, or the state is primarily responsible for long-term care, as well as on how one can establish a morally and financially sustainable long-term-care policy, given the moral hazard of people over-using entitlements once established, the political hazard of media democracies promising unfundable entitlements, the demographic hazard of relatively fewer workers to support those in need of long-term care, the moral hazard to (...)
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  20. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2010). Moral Obligation After the Death of God: Critical Reflections on Concerns From Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, and Elizabeth Anscombe. [REVIEW] In Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Social Philosophy and Policy. Cambridge University Press 317-340.
    Once God is no longer recognized as the ground and the enforcer of morality, the character and force of morality undergoes a significant change, a point made by G.E.M. Anscombe in her observation that without God the significance of morality is changed, as the word criminal would be changed if there were no criminal law and criminal courts. There is no longer in principle a God's-eye perspective from which one can envisage setting moral pluralism aside. In addition, it becomes impossible (...)
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  21.  22
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2007). Long-Term Care: The Family, Post-Modernity, and Conflicting Moral Life-Worlds. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (5):519 – 536.
    Long-term care is controversial because it involves foundational disputes. Some are moral-economic, bearing on whether the individual, the family, or the state is primarily responsible for long-term care, as well as on how one can establish a morally and financially sustainable long-term-care policy, given the moral hazard of people over-using entitlements once established, the political hazard of media democracies promising unfundable entitlements, the demographic hazard of relatively fewer workers to support those in need of long-term care, the moral hazard to (...)
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  22. H. Tristram Engelhardt (forthcoming). Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources and the Availability of Organ Transplantation: Some Moral Presupposition. Bioethics, New Jersey, Paulist Press.
     
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  23. H. T. Engelhardt Jr (forthcoming). Is the Allocation of Organs Special. The Foundations of Bioethics.
     
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  24.  6
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2010). Kant, Hegel, and Habermas: Reflections on “Glauben Und Wissen”. Review of Metaphysics 63 (4):871-903.
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  25.  33
    H. T. Engelhardt (2012). Christian Bioethics in a Post-Christian World: Facing the Challenges. Christian Bioethics 18 (1):93-114.
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  26.  61
    H. T. Engelhardt (1987). Wolfram Kaiser and Arina Voelker (Eds.): 1985, Ethik in der Geschichte von Medizin Und Naturwissenschaften, Martin-Luther Universitaet, Halle-Wittenberg, 260 Pp.; Ernst Luther (Ed.): 1986, Ethik in der Medizin, VEB Verlag, Berlin, 228 Pp.; Joachim Mandel and Hans Lange: 1985, Aerztliche Rechtspraxis, VEB Verlag, Berlin, 332 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (3):291-292.
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  27. H. T. Engelhardt (2002). Discerning the Signs of the Times: Recognizing the Dangers of Reckless Social Justice and Advocating With Responsibility. Christian Bioethics 8 (1):49-61.
  28. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2007). Bioethics as Politics : A Critical Reassessment. In Lisa A. Eckenwiler & Felicia Cohn (eds.), The Ethics of Bioethics: Mapping the Moral Landscape. Johns Hopkins University Press
     
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  29.  35
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (2007). Why Ecumenism Fails: Taking Theological Differences Seriously. Christian Bioethics 13 (1):25-51.
    Contemporary Christians are separated by foundationally disparate understandings of Christianity itself. Christians do not share one theology, much less a common understanding of the significance of sin, suffering, disease, and death. These foundational disagreements not only stand as impediments to an intellectually defensible ecumenism, but they also form the underpinnings of major disputes in the culture wars, particularly as these are expressed in healthcare. There is not one Christian bioethics of sin, suffering, sickness, and death. In this article, the character (...)
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  30.  53
    H. T. Engelhardt (2005). What is Christian About Christian Bioethics? Metaphysical, Epistemological, and Moral Differences. Christian Bioethics 11 (3):241-253.
    (2005). What is Christian About Christian Bioethics? Metaphysical, Epistemological, and Moral Differences. Christian Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 241-253.
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  31. H. Tristram Engelhardt & Arthur L. Caplan (1987). Scientific Controversies Case Studies in the Resolution and Closure of Disputes in Science and Technology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  32.  50
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1986). The Journal After ten Years. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 11 (1):1-1.
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  33.  5
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr & Fabrice Jotterand (2004). The Precautionary Principle: A Dialectical Reconsideration. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (3):301-312.
    This essay examines an overlooked element of the precautionary principle: a prudent assessment of the long-range or remote catastrophes possibly associated with technological development must include the catastrophes that may take place because of the absence of such technologies. In short, this brief essay attempts to turn the precautionary principle on its head by arguing that, (1) if the long-term survival of any life form is precarious, and if the survival of the current human population is particularly precarious, especially given (...)
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  34.  23
    H. T. Engelhardt (2011). Orthodox Christian Bioethics: Some Foundational Differences From Western Christian Bioethics. Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (4):487-499.
    Just as the physics of Newton and Einstein are separated by foundationally different paradigms, so that key terms such as time, space, mass, and energy have different meanings in the different physics, this is also the case with respect to the various Christianities. Given different theological frameworks, the ‘same term’ can have different extensions and intensions. This essay explores the implications of the differences in the theological paradigm shaping Orthodox Christianity in contrast to Western Christianity, in particular Roman Catholicism, with (...)
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  35.  10
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1999). Healthcare Ethics Committees: Re-Examining Their Social and Moral Functions. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 11 (2):87-100.
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  36.  16
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (2007). The Injustice of Enforced Equal Access to Transplant Operations: Rethinking Reckless Claims of Fairness. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (2):256-264.
    The globalizing or totalizing imposition of a particular understanding of justice, fairness, or equality, as seen, for example, in Canada's single health care system, which forbids the sale of private insurance and the purchase of better basic health care, cannot be justified in general secular terms because of the following limitations: the plurality of understandings of justice, fairness, and equality, and the inability to establish one understanding as canonical. The secular state lacks plausible moral authority for the coercive imposition of (...)
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  37.  70
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr, Jeremy R. Garrett & Fabrice Jotterand (2006). Bioethics and the Philosophy of Medicine: A Thirty-Year Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):565 – 568.
  38. Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt & James J. McCartney (eds.) (1981). Concepts of Health and Disease: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Addison-Wesley, Advanced Book Program/World Science Division.
     
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  39. H. T. Engelhardt (2002). Conflicting Moralities and Theologies: The Culture Wars in Bioethics Reexamined. Christian Bioethics 8 (1):3-8.
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  40. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2000). Bioethics at the Threshold of the New Millennium. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):653 – 654.
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  41.  30
    H. Tristram Engelhardt & Fabrice Jotterand (2004). The Precautionary Principle: A Dialectical Reconsideration. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (3):301 – 312.
    This essay examines an overlooked element of the precautionary principle: a prudent assessment of the long-range or remote catastrophes possibly associated with technological development must include the catastrophes that may take place because of the absence of such technologies. In short, this brief essay attempts to turn the precautionary principle on its head by arguing that, (1) if the long-term survival of any life form is precarious, and if the survival of the current human population is particularly precarious, especially given (...)
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  42.  12
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (1990). Human Nature Technologically Revisited. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (1):180.
    This essay is meant as a form of philosophical exorcism. The goal is to dispel the view that there are general secular grounds for holding human germline genetic engineering to be intrinsically wrong, a malum in se, or a morally culpable violation of human nature. The essay endorses the view that major obligations of prudence and care attend the development of this technology. However, these justifiable moral concerns can be seen more clearly when one has dispelled what must, from a (...)
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  43.  42
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1990). The Birth of the Medical Humanities and the Rebirth of the Philosophy of Medicine: The Vision of Edmund D. Pellegrino. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (3):237-241.
  44.  20
    H. T. Engelhardt (2010). Christian Medical Moral Theology (Alias Bioethics) at the Beginning of the Twenty-First Century: Some Critical Reflections. Christian Bioethics 16 (2):117-127.
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  45.  10
    H. T. Engelhardt (2005). Sin and Bioethics: Why a Liturgical Anthropology is Foundational. Christian Bioethics 11 (2):221-239.
    (2005). Sin and Bioethics: Why a Liturgical Anthropology is Foundational. Christian Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 221-239.
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  46.  88
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1978). Discussion and Critique: A Preface. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (3):167-168.
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  47.  56
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1986). Clinical Complaints and the Ens Morbi. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 11 (3):207-214.
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  48.  17
    H. T. Engelhardt (2009). Christian Bioethics in a Western Europe After Christendom. Christian Bioethics 15 (1):86-100.
    Europe has taken on a new, post-Christian, if not a somewhat anti-Christian character. The tension between Western Europe's ever more secular present and its substantial Christian past lies at the heart of Western Europe's current struggle to articulate a coherent cultural and moral identity. The result is that Western European mainline churches are themselves in the midst of an identity crisis, thus compounding Western Europe's identity crisis. Christian bioethics in Europe exists against the backdrop of these profound cultural cross currents (...)
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  49.  44
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1974). The Ontology of Abortion. Ethics 84 (3):217-234.
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  50.  14
    H. T. Engelhardt (2001). The DeChristianization of Christian Health Care Institutions, or, How the Pursuit of Social Justice and Excellence Can Obscure the Pursuit of Holiness. Christian Bioethics 7 (1):151-161.
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