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  1. Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr & James J. McCartney (forthcoming). Used, and Are Used, as Invectives: Their Aim is to Degrade—and, Hence, Socially Constrain—the Person Diagnosed." Laing Makes the Same Objection in Numerous Places in His Work Eg, The Politics of Experience, Pp. 121-2. [REVIEW] Bioethics.
     
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  2. H. Tristram Engelhardt (forthcoming). Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources and the Availability of Organ Transplantation: Some Moral Presupposition. Bioethics, New Jersey, Paulist Press.
     
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  3. H. Tristram Engelhardt (forthcoming). Kant, Hegel, and Habermas: Reflections on" Glauben Und Wissen". Review of Metaphysics.
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  4. H. Tristram Engelhardt (forthcoming). Rights to Health Care, Social Justice, and Fairness in Healthcare Allocations. Foundation of Bioethics.
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  5. H. Tristram Engelhardt & Bruce Jennings (forthcoming). Contested Terrain: Pluralism and the Good. Hastings Center Report.
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  6. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2013). The Journal Loses Its Founding Editor. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):743-743.
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  7. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2012). Bioethics Critically Reconsidered: Living After Foundations. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):97-105.
    Given intractable moral pluralism, what ought one to make of the bioethics that arose in the early 1970s, grounded as it was in the false assumption that there is a common secular morality that secular bioethics ought to apply? It is as if bioethics developed without recognition of the crisis at the heart of secular morality itself. Secular moral rationality cannot of itself provide the foundations to identify a particular morality and its bioethics as canonical. One is not just confronted (...)
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  8. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2011). Christian Bioethics After Christendom: Living in a Secular Fundamentalist Polity and Culture. Christian Bioethics 17 (1):64-95.
    The contemporary societies of the West are characterized by a collision of radically incommensurable cultures, that of traditional Christianity and that of the robustly laicist cultures that took shape in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, drawing not only on the French Revolution and the Western European Enlightenment but also on deep roots in the synthesis of faith and reason that framed the thirteenth-century Western Christian Middle ages. This article explores the foundational contrast and conflict between traditional Christian bioethics and the (...)
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  9. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2011). Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultants: In Search of Professional Status in a Post-Modern World. HEC Forum 23 (3):129-145.
    The American Society for Bioethics and the Humanities (ASBH) issued its Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation just as it is becoming ever clearer that secular ethics is intractably plural and without foundations in any reality that is not a social–historical construction (ASBH Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation , 2nd edn. American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, Glenview, IL, 2011 ). Core Competencies fails to recognize that the ethics of health care ethics consultants is not ethics in (...)
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  10. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2011). The Culture Wars in Bioethics Revisited. Christian Bioethics 17 (1):1-8.
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  11. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2010). Kant, Hegel, and Habermas. Review of Metaphysics 63 (4):871-903.
  12. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2010). Moral Obligation After the Death of God: Critical Reflections on Concerns From Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, and Elizabeth Anscombe. [REVIEW] In Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Moral Obligation. Cambridge University Press. 317-340.
    Once God is no longer recognized as the ground and the enforcer of morality, the character and force of morality undergoes a significant change, a point made by G.E.M. Anscombe in her observation that without God the significance of morality is changed, as the word criminal would be changed if there were no criminal law and criminal courts. There is no longer in principle a God's-eye perspective from which one can envisage setting moral pluralism aside. In addition, it becomes impossible (...)
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  13. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2010). How a Confucian Perspective Reclaims Moral Substance: An Introduction. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):3-9.
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  14. Griffin Trotter & H. Tristram Engelhardt (2010). CQ Review. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):151.
     
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  15. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2009). Credentialing Strategically Ambiguous and Heterogeneous Social Skills: The Emperor Without Clothes. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 21 (3):293-306.
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  16. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2007). Bioethics as Politics : A Critical Reassessment. In Lisa A. Eckenwiler & Felicia Cohn (eds.), The Ethics of Bioethics: Mapping the Moral Landscape. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  17. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2007). Long-Term Care: The Family, Post-Modernity, and Conflicting Moral Life-Worlds. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (5):519 – 536.
    Long-term care is controversial because it involves foundational disputes. Some are moral-economic, bearing on whether the individual, the family, or the state is primarily responsible for long-term care, as well as on how one can establish a morally and financially sustainable long-term-care policy, given the moral hazard of people over-using entitlements once established, the political hazard of media democracies promising unfundable entitlements, the demographic hazard of relatively fewer workers to support those in need of long-term care, the moral hazard to (...)
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  18. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2007). The Injustice of Enforced Equal Access to Transplant Operations: Rethinking Reckless Claims of Fairness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (2):256-264.
  19. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2007). Why Ecumenism Fails: Taking Theological Differences Seriously. Christian Bioethics 13 (1):25-51.
    Contemporary Christians are separated by foundationally disparate understandings of Christianity itself. Christians do not share one theology, much less a common understanding of the significance of sin, suffering, disease, and death. These foundational disagreements not only stand as impediments to an intellectually defensible ecumenism, but they also form the underpinnings of major disputes in the culture wars, particularly as these are expressed in healthcare. There is not one Christian bioethics of sin, suffering, sickness, and death. In this article, the character (...)
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  20. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr & Response by Joel James Shuman (2007). The Moral Inevitability of Two Tiers of Health Care. In Margaret Monahan Hogan & David Solomon (eds.), Medical Ethics at Notre Dame: The J. Philip Clarke Family Lectures, 1988-1999. [South Bend, Ind.?]The Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture.
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  21. Susan Dodds, Colin Thomson, Robert M. Veatch, Arthur Caplan, Autumn Fiester, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Ana Smith Iltis, Fabrice Jotterand, Wenmay Rei & Jiunn-Rong Yeh (2006). National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature Selected Citations From the ETHXWeb Database on Bioethics Centers October 17, 2007. Bioethics 20 (6):326-338.
     
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  22. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2006). Public Discourse and Reasonable Pluralims : Rethinking the Requirements of Neurtality. In David E. Guinn (ed.), Handbook of Bioethics and Religion. Oxford University Press.
     
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  23. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2006). The Search for a Global Morality: Bioethics, the Culture Wars, and Moral Diversity. In H. Tristram Engelhardt (ed.), Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus. M & M Scrivener Press.
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  24. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2006). Critical Reflections on Theology's Handmaid. Philosophy and Theology 18 (1):53-75.
    Orthodox Christian theology gives philosophy the same role it played in the Church of the first half-millennium. This article distinguishes among nine senses of philosophy and four senses of theology in order to highlight the characteristic features of Orthodox Christian theology’s use of philosophy and philosophical reasoning. It shows why, given the metaphysics and epistemology of Orthodox Christian theology (e.g., God is recognized as fully transcendent, such thatthere is no analogia entis between created and Uncreated Being, with the result that (...)
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  25. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr, Jeremy R. Garrett & Fabrice Jotterand (2006). Bioethics and the Philosophy of Medicine: A Thirty-Year Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):565 – 568.
  26. H. Tristram Engelhardt (ed.) (2006). Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus. M & M Scrivener Press.
    This collection of essays, Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus, deals with the issue of the repeated failure of attempts to derive a universal set of ...
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  27. Mark J. Cherry & H. Tristram Engelhardt (2004). Informed Consent in Texas: Theory and Practice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):237 – 252.
    The legal basis of informed consent in Texas may on first examination suggest an unqualified affirmation of persons as the source of authority over themselves. This view of individuals in the practice of informed consent tends to present persons outside of any social context in general and outside of their families in particular. The actual functioning of law and medical practice in Texas, however, is far more complex. This study begins with a brief overview of the roots of Texas law (...)
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  28. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr & Fabrice Jotterand (2004). The Precautionary Principle: A Dialectical Reconsideration. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (3):301-312.
    This essay examines an overlooked element of the precautionary principle: a prudent assessment of the long-range or remote catastrophes possibly associated with technological development must include the catastrophes that may take place because of the absence of such technologies. In short, this brief essay attempts to turn the precautionary principle on its head by arguing that, (1) if the long-term survival of any life form is precarious, and if the survival of the current human population is particularly precarious, especially given (...)
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  29. H. Tristram Engelhardt & Fabrice Jotterand (2004). The Precautionary Principle: A Dialectical Reconsideration. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (3):301 – 312.
    This essay examines an overlooked element of the precautionary principle: a prudent assessment of the long-range or remote catastrophes possibly associated with technological development must include the catastrophes that may take place because of the absence of such technologies. In short, this brief essay attempts to turn the precautionary principle on its head by arguing that, (1) if the long-term survival of any life form is precarious, and if the survival of the current human population is particularly precarious, especially given (...)
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  30. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2003). Moral Philosophy and Theology: Why is There so Little Difference for Roman Catholics? Christian Bioethics 9 (2):315-329.
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  31. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2003). The Bioethics Consultant: Giving Moral Advice in the Midst of Moral Controversy. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 15 (4):362-382.
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  32. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2003). The Dechristianization of Christian Hospital Chaplaincy: Some Bioethics Reflections on Professionalization, Ecumenization, and Secularization. Christian Bioethics 9 (1):139-160.
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  33. David A. Asch, Jeffrey R. Botkin, Katrina A. Bramstedt, Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr, D. Micah Hester, Kenneth V. Iserson & Mark G. Kuczewski (2002). Bette Anton, MLS, is the Head Librarian of the Optometry Library/Health Sciences Information Service. This Library Serves the University of California at Berkeley–University of California at San Francisco Joint Medical Program and the University of California at Berkeley School of Optometry. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11:4-5.
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  34. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2002). Bioethics After the Enlightenment. Christian Bioethics 8 (3):225-235.
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  35. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2002). Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 8 (3):349-350.
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  36. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2002). The Ordination of Bioethicists as Secular Moral Experts. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):59-82.
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  37. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2002). Consensus Formation: The Creation of an Ideology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):7-16.
    Bioethics is not merely a theoretical discipline but a practice as well. Indeed, bioethics is a sort of moral trade. Bioethicists serve on ethics committees, give expert testimony to courts, provide guidance for healthcare policy, and receive payment for these services. The difficulty is that their role as experts able to guide clinical choice and public policy formation is brought into question by the diversity of moral understandings regarding central moral issues at the heart of the culture wars in healthcare. (...)
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  38. Kazumasa Hoshino, H. Tristram Engelhardt & Lisa M. Rasmussen (eds.) (2002). Bioethics and Moral Content: National Traditions of Health Care Morality: Papers Dedicated in Tribute to Kazumasa Hoshino. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Is there only one bioethics? Is a global bioethics possible? Or, instead, does one encounter a plurality of bioethical approaches shaped by local cultural and national traditions? Some thirty years ago a field of applied ethics emerged under the rubric `bioethics'. Little thought was given at the time to the possibility that this field bore the imprint of a particular American set of moral commitments. This volume explores the plurality of moral perspectives shaping bioethics. It is inspired by Kazumasa Hoshino's (...)
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  39. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2000). Bioethics at the Threshold of the New Millennium. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):653 – 654.
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  40. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2000). Looking to the New Millennium: Homage to Edmund D. Pellegrino. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (1):3 – 4.
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  41. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2000). Privacy and Limited Democracy: The Moral Centrality of Persons. Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (02):120-.
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  42. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1999). Healthcare Ethics Committees: Re-Examining Their Social and Moral Functions. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 11 (2):87-100.
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  43. H. Tristram Engelhardt (1999). Bioethics in the Third Millennium: Some Critical Anticipations. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (3):225-243.
    : Its promises to the contrary notwithstanding, bioethics is plural. There is a diversity of content-full moral understandings of the good and the right. Moreover, there is no secular means in principle to set this diversity aside without begging the question. This moral diversity exists both as a sociological condition and as a moral epistemological constraint. Without succumbing to a metaphysical scepticism or moral relativism, the bioethics of the future, if it is to be honest, should learn how to live (...)
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  44. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1998). Editorial: The Future: Into the Next Millennium with Swets & Zeitlinger. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (1):2-2.
     
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  45. Kenneth F. Schaffner & H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1998). Medicine, Philosophy Of. In Craig Edward (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge. 264-269.
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  46. H. Tristram Engelhardt (1997). Freedom and Moral Diversity: The Moral Failures of Health Care in the Welfare State. Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (02):180-.
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  47. H. Tristram Engelhardt (1997). The Crisis of Virtue: Arming for the Cultural Wars and Pellegrino at the Limes. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).
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  48. H. Tristram Engelhardt (1996). Bioethics Reconsidered: Theory and Method in a Post-Christian, Post-Modern Age. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (4):336-341.
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  49. H. Tristram Engelhardt (1996). Germ-Line Genetic Engineering and Moral Diversity: Moral Controversies in a Post-Christian World. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (02):47-.
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