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  1. H. V. McLachlan (2012). A Proposed Non-Consequentialist Policy for the Ethical Distribution of Scarce Vaccination in the Face of an Influenza Pandemic. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):317-318.
    The current UK policy for the distribution of scarce vaccination in an influenza pandemic is ethically dubious. It is based on the planned outcome of the maximum health benefit in terms of the saving of lives and the reduction of illness. To that end, the population is classified in terms of particular priority groups. An alternative policy with a non-consequentialist rationale is proposed in the present work. The state should give the vaccination, in the first instance, to those who are (...)
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  2. H. V. McLachlan (2010). Assisted Suicide and the Killing of People? Maybe. Physician-Assisted Suicide and the Killing of Patients? No: The Rejection of Shaw's New Perspective on Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):306-309.
    David Shaw presents a new argument to support the old claim that there is not a significant moral difference between killing and letting die and, by implication, between active and passive euthanasia. He concludes that doctors should not make a distinction between them. However, whether or not killing and letting die are morally equivalent is not as important a question as he suggests. One can justify legal distinctions on non-moral grounds. One might oppose physician-assisted suicide and active euthanasia when performed (...)
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  3. H. V. McLachlan (2009). To Kill is Not the Same as to Let Die: A Reply to Coggon. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (7):456-458.
    Coggon’s remarks on a previous paper on active and passive euthanasia elicit a clarification and an elaboration of the argument in support of the claim that there is a moral difference between killing and letting die. The relevant moral duties are different in nature, strength and content. Moreover, not all people who are involved in the relevant situations have the same moral duties. The particular case that is presented in support of the claim that to kill is not the same (...)
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  4. H. V. McLachlan (2008). The Ethics of Killing and Letting Die: Active and Passive Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (8):636-638.
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  5. H. V. McLachlan (2008). The Religious Beliefs of Students and the Teaching of Medical Ethics: A Comment on Brassington. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):396-398.
    It has recently been suggested by Brassington that, when students in classes in medical ethics announce that some view that they wish to express is related to their religious convictions, the teacher is obliged to question them explicitly about the suggested link. Here, a different conclusion is reached. The view is upheld that, although the stratagem recommended by Brassington is permissible and might sometimes be desirable, it is not obligatory nor is it, in general, likely to be optimal.
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  6. H. V. McLachlan (2005). Justice and the NHS: A Comment on Culyer. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):379-382.
  7. H. V. McLachlan (2003). Why I Don't Believe in Moral Values: A Comment on Culyer. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):242-242.
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  8. H. V. McLachlan (2002). Tobacco, Taxation, and Fairness. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):381-383.
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  9. H. V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales (2001). Posthumous Insemination and Consent: The Continuing Troubling Case of Mr and Mrs Blood. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 9 (1):7-12.
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  10. H. V. McLachlan (1999). Altruism, Blood Donation and Public Policy: A Reply to Keown. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):532-536.
    This is a continuation of and a development of a debate between John Keown and me. The issue discussed is whether, in Britain, an unpaid system of blood donation promotes and is justified by its promotion of altruism. Doubt is cast on the notions that public policies can, and, if they can, that they should, be aimed at the promotion and expression of altruism rather than of self-interest, especially that of a mercenary sort. Reflections upon President Kennedy's proposition, introduced into (...)
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  11. H. V. McLachlan (1998). The Unpaid Donation of Blood and Altruism: A Comment on Keown. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):252-256.
    In line with article 3.4 of EC directive 89/381, Keown has presented an ethical case in support of the policy of voluntary, unpaid donation of blood. Although no doubt is cast on the desirability of the policy, that part of Keown's argument which pertains to the suggested laudability of altruism and of its encouragment by social policy is examined and shown to be dubious.
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  12. H. V. McLachlan (1997). Bodies, Rights and Abortion. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):176-180.
    The issue of abortion is discussed with reference to the claim that people have a right of control over their own bodies. Do people "own" their own bodies? If so, what would be entailed? These questions are discussed in commonsense terms and also in relation to the jurisprudence of Hohfeld, Honore, Munzer and Waldron. It is argued that whether or not women are morally and/or should be legally entitled to have abortions, such entitlements cannot be derived from a general moral (...)
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  13. H. V. McLachlan (1997). Defending Commercial Surrogate Motherhood Against Van Niekerk and Van Zyl. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):344-348.
    The arguments of Van Niekerk and Van Zyl that, on the grounds that it involves an inappropriate commodification and alienation of women's labour, commercial surrogate motherhood (CSM) is morally suspect are discussed and considered to be defective. In addition, doubt is cast on the notion that CSM should be illegal.
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  14. H. V. McLachlan (1995). Smokers, Virgins, Equity and Health Care Costs. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (4):209-213.
    Julian Le Grand's case for saying that it would be equitable if smokers and smokers alone were to pay the costs of smoking-related health care is considered and found to be deficient.
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  15. H. V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales (1984). Book Reviews : Witch-Hunting, Magic and the New Philosophy: An Introduction to Debates of the Scientific Revolution 1450-1750. By Brian Easlea. Sussex and New Jersey: The Harvester Press and Humanities Press, 1980. Pp. 283. $42.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (4):577-580.
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  16. H. V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales (1983). Rationality and the Belief in Witches: A Rejoinder to Tibbetts. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (4):475-477.
  17. H. V. Mclachlan & J. K. Swales (1982). Tibbetts's Theory of Rationality and Scottish Witchcraft. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 12 (1):75-79.
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