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Henrik Zinkernagel [12]H. Zinkernagel [4]
  1. Henrik Zinkernagel (forthcoming). Philosophical Aspects of Modern Cosmology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics.
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  2. Svend E. Rugh & Henrik Zinkernagel (2011). Weyl's Principle, Cosmic Time and Quantum Fundamentalism. In. In Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao Gonzalo, Thomas Uebel, Stephan Hartmann & Marcel Weber (eds.), Explanation, Prediction, and Confirmation. Springer. 411--424.
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  3. Henrik Zinkernagel (2011). Some Trends in the Philosophy of Physics. Theoria 26 (2):215-241.
    A short review of some recent developments in the philosophy of physics is presented. I focus on themes which illustrate relations and points of common interest between philosophy of physics and three of its ‘neighboring’ fields: Physics, metaphysics and general philosophy of science. The main examples discussed inthese three ‘border areas’ are (i) decoherence and the interpretation of quantum mechanics; (ii) time in physics and metaphysics; and (iii) methodological issues surrounding the multiverse idea in modern cosmology.
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  4. Henrik Zinkernagel (2010). Causal Fundamentalism in Physics. In. In Mauricio Suarez, Mauro Dorato & Miklos Redei (eds.), Epsa Philosophical Issues in the Sciences. Springer. 311--322.
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  5. Henrik Zinkernagel (2009). Disappearance of Time? Godel and the Theory of Relativity. Teorema 28 (1):125-139.
     
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  6. Henrik Zinkernagel (2009). ¿ La desaparición del tiempo?: Gödel y las teorías de la relatividad. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 28 (1):125-139.
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  7. Henrik Zinkernagel (2008). Did Time Have a Beginning? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (3):237 – 258.
    By analyzing the meaning of time I argue, without endorsing operationalism, that time is necessarily related to physical systems which can serve as clocks. This leads to a version of relationism about time which entails that there is no time 'before' the universe. Three notions of metaphysical 'time' (associated, respectively, with time as a mathematical concept, substantivalism, and modal relationism) which might support the idea of time 'before' the universe are discussed. I argue that there are no good reasons to (...)
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  8. Henrik Zinkernagel (2006). The Philosophy Behind Quantum Gravity. Theoria 21 (3):295-312.
    This paper investigates some of the philosophical and conceptual issues raised by the search for a quantum theory of gravity. It is critically discussed whether such a theory is necessary in the first place, and how much would be accomplished if it is eventually constructed. I argue that the motivations behind, and expectations to, a theory of quantum gravity are entangled with central themes in the philosophy of science, in particular unification, reductionism, and the interpretation of quantum mechanics. I further (...)
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  9. E. S. & H. Zinkernagel (2002). The Quantum Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (4):663-705.
    The cosmological constant problem arises at the intersection between general relativity and quantum field theory, and is regarded as a fundamental problem in modern physics. In this paper, we describe the historical and conceptual origin of the cosmological constant problem which is intimately connected to the vacuum concept in quantum field theory. We critically discuss how the problem rests on the notion of physically real vacuum energy, and which relations between general relativity and quantum field theory are assumed in order (...)
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  10. B. Lautrup & H. Zinkernagel (1999). G-2 and the Trust in Experimental Results. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 30 (1):85-110.
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  11. S. E. Rugh, H. Zinkernagel & T. Y. Cao (1999). The Casimir Effect and the Interpretation of the Vacuum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 30 (1):111-139.
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  12. E. S., H. Zinkernagel & Y. T. (1999). The Casimir Effect and the Interpretation of the Vacuum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 30 (1):111-139.
    The Casimir force between two neutral metallic plates is often considered conclusive evidence for the reality of electromagnetic zero-point fluctuations in 'empty space' (i.e. in absence of any boundaries). However, it is not well known that the Casimir force can be derived from many different points of view. The purpose of this note is to supply a conceptually oriented introduction to a representative set of these different interpretations. The different accounts suggest that the Casimir effect reveals nothing conclusive about the (...)
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