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Henrik Zinkernagel [15]H. Zinkernagel [10]
  1.  57
    Henrik Zinkernagel (2011). Some Trends in the Philosophy of Physics. Theoria 26 (2):215-241.
    A short review of some recent developments in the philosophy of physics is presented. I focus on themes which illustrate relations and points of common interest between philosophy of physics and three of its ‘neighboring’ fields: Physics, metaphysics and general philosophy of science. The main examples discussed inthese three ‘border areas’ are (i) decoherence and the interpretation of quantum mechanics; (ii) time in physics and metaphysics; and (iii) methodological issues surrounding the multiverse idea in modern cosmology.
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  2.  17
    Svend E. Rugh & Henrik Zinkernagel (2011). Weyl's Principle, Cosmic Time and Quantum Fundamentalism. In Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao Gonzalo, Thomas Uebel, Stephan Hartmann & Marcel Weber (eds.), Explanation, Prediction, and Confirmation. Springer 411--424.
    We examine the necessary physical underpinnings for setting up the cosmological standard model with a global cosmic time parameter. In particular, we discuss the role of Weyl's principle which asserts that cosmic matter moves according to certain regularity requirements. After a brief historical introduction to Weyl's principle we argue that although the principle is often not explicitly mentioned in modern standard texts on cosmology, it is implicitly assumed and is, in fact, necessary for a physically well-defined notion of cosmic time. (...)
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  3. Henrik Zinkernagel (2008). Did Time Have a Beginning? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (3):237 – 258.
    By analyzing the meaning of time I argue, without endorsing operationalism, that time is necessarily related to physical systems which can serve as clocks. This leads to a version of relationism about time which entails that there is no time 'before' the universe. Three notions of metaphysical 'time' (associated, respectively, with time as a mathematical concept, substantivalism, and modal relationism) which might support the idea of time 'before' the universe are discussed. I argue that there are no good reasons to (...)
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  4.  17
    Henrik Zinkernagel (2010). Causal Fundamentalism in Physics. In Mauricio Suarez, Mauro Dorato & Miklos Redei (eds.), Epsa Philosophical Issues in the Sciences. Springer 311--322.
    Norton has recently argued that causation is merely a useful folk concept and that it fails to hold for some simple systems even in the supposed paradigm case of a causal physical theory – namely Newtonian mechanics. The purpose of this article is to argue against this devaluation of causality in physics. My main argument is that Norton’s alleged counterexample to causality within standard Newtonian physics fails to obey what I shall call the causal core of Newtonian mechanics. In particular, (...)
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  5.  6
    Henrik Zinkernagel (2016). Niels Bohr on the Wave Function and the Classical/Quantum Divide. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 53:9-19.
    It is well known that Niels Bohr insisted on the necessity of classical concepts in the account of quantum phenomena. But there is little consensus concerning his reasons, and what he exactly meant by this. In this paper, I re-examine Bohr’s interpretation of quantum mechanics, and argue that the necessity of the classical can be seen as part of his response to the measurement problem. More generally, I attempt to clarify Bohr’s view on the classical/quantum divide, arguing that the relation (...)
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  6.  9
    S. E. Rugh, H. Zinkernagel & T. Y. Cao (1999). The Casimir Effect and the Interpretation of the Vacuum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 30 (1):111-139.
    The Casimir force between two neutral metallic plates is often considered conclusive evidence for the reality of electromagnetic zero-point fluctuations in ‘empty space’. However, it is not well known that the Casimir force can be derived from many different points of view. The purpose of this note is to supply a conceptually oriented introduction to a representative set of these different interpretations. The different accounts suggest that the Casimir effect reveals nothing conclusive about the nature of the vacuum.
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  7.  21
    B. Lautrup & H. Zinkernagel (1999). G-2 and the Trust in Experimental Results. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 30 (1):85-110.
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  8. E. S. & H. Zinkernagel (2002). The Quantum Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (4):663-705.
    The cosmological constant problem arises at the intersection between general relativity and quantum field theory, and is regarded as a fundamental problem in modern physics. In this paper, we describe the historical and conceptual origin of the cosmological constant problem which is intimately connected to the vacuum concept in quantum field theory. We critically discuss how the problem rests on the notion of physically real vacuum energy, and which relations between general relativity and quantum field theory are assumed in order (...)
     
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  9. E. S., H. Zinkernagel & Y. T. (1999). The Casimir Effect and the Interpretation of the Vacuum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 30 (1):111-139.
    The Casimir force between two neutral metallic plates is often considered conclusive evidence for the reality of electromagnetic zero-point fluctuations in 'empty space' (i.e. in absence of any boundaries). However, it is not well known that the Casimir force can be derived from many different points of view. The purpose of this note is to supply a conceptually oriented introduction to a representative set of these different interpretations. The different accounts suggest that the Casimir effect reveals nothing conclusive about the (...)
     
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  10.  4
    Henrik Zinkernagel (2014). Philosophical Aspects of Modern Cosmology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 46 (1):1-4.
    This paper is a short introduction to a special issue on philosophy of cosmology, published in the May 2014 issue of Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics. I briefly introduce the philosophy of cosmology, and then provide a short outline of the contents of the papers in the special issue. The contributors are George Ellis, Dominico Giulini, Marc Lachièze-Rey, Helge Kragh, Jeremy Butterfield, Jean-Christophe Hamilton, Martín López-Corredoira, Brigitte Falkenburg, Robert Brandenberger and Chris Smeenk. I conclude with a few (...)
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  11.  1
    S. E. Rugh & H. Zinkernagel (2009). On the Physical Basis of Cosmic Time. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 40 (1):1-19.
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  12. Henrik Zinkernagel (2009). ¿ La desaparición del tiempo?: Gödel y las teorías de la relatividad. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):125-139.
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  13. B. Lautrup & H. Zinkernagel (1999). G−2 and the Trust in Experimental Results. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 30 (1):85-110.
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  14. S. E. Rugh, H. Zinkernagel & T. Y. Cao (1999). The Casimir Effect and the Interpretation of the Vacuum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 30 (1):111-139.
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  15. S. E. Rugh & H. Zinkernagel (2002). The Quantum Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (4):663-705.
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  16. H. Zinkernagel (2002). Cosmology, Particles, and the Unity of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (3):493-516.
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  17. Henrik Zinkernagel (2009). Disappearance of Time? Godel and the Theory of Relativity. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):125-139.
     
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