Search results for 'Habits' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ezio Di Nucci (2013). Habits, Nudges, and Consent. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):27 - 29.
    I distinguish between 'hard nudges' and 'soft nudges', arguing that it is possible to show that the latter can be compatible with informed consent - as Cohen has recently suggested; but that the real challenge is the compatibility of the former. Hard nudges are the more effective nudges because they work on less than conscious mechanisms such as those underlying our habits: whether those influences - which are often beyond the subject's awareness - can be reconciled with informed consent (...)
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  2. Alia Al-Saji (2014). A Phenomenology of Hesitation: Interrupting Racializing Habits of Seeing. In Emily Lee (ed.), Living Alterities: Phenomenology, Embodiment, and Race. State University of New York Press 133-172.
    This paper asks how perception becomes racializing and seeks the means for its critical interruption. My aim is not only to understand the recalcitrant and limitative temporal structure of racializing habits of seeing, but also to uncover the possibilities within perception for a critical awareness and destabilization of this structure. Reading Henri Bergson and Maurice Merleau-Ponty in dialogue with Frantz Fanon, Iris Marion Young and race-critical feminism, I locate in hesitation the phenomenological moment where habits of seeing can (...)
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  3.  3
    Ezio Di Nucci (forthcoming). Habits, Priming, Aliefs and the Explanation of Mindless Action. Minds and Machines.
    There is a growing body of evidence on the influences of automatic and unconscious processes on our actions. Here I introduce some representative examples of this growing body of evidence, chosen so as to form a diverse group of related mindless phenomena: habits, skills, priming and nudges (Section 1). I then argue that this evidence challenges traditional belief-desire-based approaches in the philosophy of action (Sections 2 and 3). I further discuss a recently proposed solution to this challenge, Gendler’s Alief, (...)
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  4.  15
    Sae Won Kim & Chong Ju Choi (2007). Habits, Self-Control and Social Conventions: The Role of Global Media and Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):147 - 154.
    There has been an intellectual debate at least since the 1960s in business ethics on the role of the media in relation to consumer choice driven by either habits or rationality. If consumers are totally rational, then the global media and global corporations provide just information and knowledge. If consumers are influenced by habit then large corporations and global media can greatly influence consumer choice and create problems of self-control (Ainslie, 1992, Pico Economics: The Strategic Interaction of Successive Motivational (...)
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  5.  15
    Jānis Ozoliņš (2010). Popper's Third World: Moral Habits, Moral Habitat and Their Maintenance. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (7):742-761.
    If we accept Popper's idea that the human habitat is described in terms of three worlds, and that there are overlaps between these three worlds, our moral actions and values will also be subject to the same kinds of consideration as a repertoire of behaviours exhibited in a physical environment. We will develop moral habits in a moral habitat and our moral behaviours will also be dependent on the kind of moral habitat in which we find ourselves.There are three (...)
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  6.  17
    Jānis Ozoliņš (2010). Popper's Third World: Moral Habits, Moral Habitat and Their Maintenance. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (7):742-761.
    If we accept Popper's idea that the human habitat is described in terms of three worlds, and that there are overlaps between these three worlds, our moral actions and values will also be subject to the same kinds of consideration as a repertoire of behaviours exhibited in a physical environment. We will develop moral habits in a moral habitat and our moral behaviours will also be dependent on the kind of moral habitat in which we find ourselves.There are three (...)
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  7.  11
    Jānis Ozoliņš (2010). Popper's Third World: Moral Habits, Moral Habitat and Their Maintenance. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (7):742-761.
    If we accept Popper's idea that the human habitat is described in terms of three worlds, and that there are overlaps between these three worlds, our moral actions and values will also be subject to the same kinds of consideration as a repertoire of behaviours exhibited in a physical environment. We will develop moral habits in a moral habitat and our moral behaviours will also be dependent on the kind of moral habitat in which we find ourselves.There are three (...)
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  8.  7
    J. A. McGeoch & A. W. Melton (1929). The Comparative Retention Values of Maze Habits and of Nonsense Syllables. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (5):392.
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  9.  7
    P. W. Van Tilborg (1936). The Retention of Mental and Finger Maze Habits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):334.
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  10.  2
    William O. Jenkins & Leta M. Cunningham (1949). The Guessing-Sequence Hypothesis, the 'Spread of Effect' and Number-Guessing Habits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (2):158.
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  11.  6
    J. Bernard (1942). The Specificity of the Effect of Shock on the Acquisition and Retention of Motor and Verbal Habits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 31 (1):69.
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  12.  6
    J. H. Bowen, T. G. Andrews & Sherman Ross (1957). Effects of Counting and Ordering Habits on the Acquisition of a Simple Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (2):121.
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  13.  6
    J. F. Dashiell (1924). An Experimental Isolation of Higher Level Habits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 7 (5):391.
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  14.  3
    D. G. Ellson (1938). Quantitative Studies of the Interaction of Simple Habits. I. Recovery From Specific and Generalized Effects of Extinction. [REVIEW] Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (4):339.
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  15.  5
    Eli Saltz (1965). Spontaneous Recovery of Letter-Sequence Habits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (3):304.
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  16.  5
    Leo Postman (1962). The Effects of Language Habits on the Acquisition and Retention of Verbal Associations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (1):7.
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  17.  4
    Alfred Castaneda (1961). Supplementary Report: Differential Position Habits and Anxiety in Children as Determinants of Performance in Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (3):257.
  18.  4
    W. O. Jenkins & F. D. Sheffield (1946). Rehearsal and Guessing Habits as Sources of the 'Spread of Effect.'. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (4):316.
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  19.  2
    Michael Godkewitsch (1972). The Role of Language Habits in Understanding Letter Sound Sequences. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):63.
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  20.  2
    W. R. Miles & H. M. Bell (1929). Eye-Movement Records in the Investigation of Study Habits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (5):450.
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  21.  3
    R. H. Waters & Grace B. Poole (1933). The Relative Retention Values of Stylus and Mental Maze Habits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (3):429.
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  22.  3
    Alfred Castaneda & Lewis P. Lipsitt (1959). Relation of Stress and Differential Position Habits to Performance in Motor Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (1):25.
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  23. Bill Pollard (2006). Explaining Actions with Habits. American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):57 - 69.
    From time to time we explain what people do by referring to their habits. We explain somebody’s putting the kettle on in the morning as done through “force of habit”. We explain somebody’s missing a turning by saying that she carried straight on “out of habit”. And we explain somebody’s biting her nails as a manifestation of “a bad habit”. These are all examples of what will be referred to here as habit explanations. Roughly speaking, they explain by referring (...)
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  24.  41
    Elena Cuffari (2011). Habits of Transformation. Hypatia 26 (3):535-553.
    This essay argues that according to feminist existential phenomenology, feminist pragmatism, and feminist genealogy, our embodied condition is an important starting place for ethical living due to the inevitable role that habits play in our conduct. In bodies, the phenomenon of habit uniquely holds together the ambiguities of freedom and determinism, transcendence and immanence, and stability and plasticity. Seeing habit formation as a matter of self-growth and social justice gives fresh opportunity for thinking of “assuming ambiguity” as a lifelong (...)
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  25.  17
    Nils-Frederic Wagner & Georg Northoff (2014). Habits: Bridging the Gap Between Personhood and Personal Identity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8 (330).
    In philosophy, the criteria for personhood (PH) at a specific point in time (synchronic), and the necessary and sufficient conditions of personal identity (PI) over time (diachronic) are traditionally separated. Hence, the transition between both timescales of a person's life remains largely unclear. Personal habits reflect a decision-making (DM) process that binds together synchronic and diachronic timescales. Despite the fact that the actualization of habits takes place synchronically, they presuppose, for the possibility of their generation, time in a (...)
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  26. David Kettle (2000). Cartesian Habits And The 'Radical Line' Of Inquiry. Tradition and Discovery 27 (1):22-32.
    Cartesian habits of the imagination, thought to be abandoned when Michael Polanyi’s theory of knowledge is embraced, may persist unrecognised and distort interpretation of this theory. These habits are challenged by a ‘radical’ reading of Polanyi which consistently finds a paradigm for knowledge in lively research. It is argued that this is rooted in an intention which is at once and irreducibly receptive and critical, and which gives rise to the ’radical line’ of inquiry. In this setting, Cartesian (...)
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  27.  97
    Steven Levine (2015). Norms and Habits: Brandom on the Sociality of Action. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):248-272.
    In this paper I argue against Brandom's two-ply theory of action. For Brandom, action is the result of an agent acknowledging a practical commitment and then causally responding to that commitment by acting. Action is social because the content of the commitment upon which one acts is socially conferred in the game of giving and asking for reasons. On my proposal, instead of seeing action as the coupling of a rational capacity to acknowledge commitments and a non-rational capacity to reliably (...)
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  28.  13
    Shelby Sheppard, Catherine Ashcraft & Bruce E. Larson (2011). Controversy, Citizenship, and Counterpublics: Developing Democratic Habits of Mind. Ethics and Education 6 (1):69 - 84.
    A wealth of research suggests the importance of classroom discussion of controversial issues for adequately preparing students for participation in democratic life. Teachers, and the larger public, however, still shy away from such discussion. Much of the current research seeking to remedy this state of affairs focuses exclusively on developing knowledge and skills. While important, this ignores significant ways in which students? beliefs about the concept or nature of controversy itself might affect such discussions and potentially, the sort of citizen (...)
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  29.  1
    Sebastien Pesce (2014). Teachers' Educational Gestures and Habits of Practical Action: Edusemiotics as a Framework for Teachers' Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (3):474-489.
    When trying to help teachers cope with the critical situations they face in classrooms, public policies are mainly concerned with improving initial teacher training. I claim in this article that the role of lifelong learning should no longer be undermined and that the design of teachers' training should be supported by a thorough examination of the cognitive processes involved. A faulty view of cognition may explain both our emphasis on initial training and most of the difficulties faced in designing teachers' (...)
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  30.  21
    Robert Rosenberger (2013). The Importance of Generalized Bodily Habits for a Future World of Ubiquitous Computing. AI and Society 28 (3):289-296.
    In a future world of ubiquitous computing, in which humans interact with computerized technologies even more frequently and in even more situations than today, interface design will have increased importance. One feature of interface that I argue will be especially relevant is what I call abstract relational strategies. This refers to an approach (in both a bodily and conceptual sense) toward the use of a technology, an approach that is general enough to be applied in many different concrete scenarios. Such (...)
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  31.  13
    Matthew J. Czarny, Ruth R. Faden, Marie T. Nolan, Edwin Bodensiek & Jeremy Sugarman (2008). Medical and Nursing Students' Television Viewing Habits: Potential Implications for Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):1 – 8.
    Television medical dramas frequently depict the practice of medicine and bioethical issues in a strikingly realistic but sometimes inaccurate fashion. Because these shows depict medicine so vividly and are so relevant to the career interests of medical and nursing students, they may affect these students' beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions regarding the practice of medicine and bioethical issues. We conducted a web-based survey of medical and nursing students to determine the medical drama viewing habits and impressions of bioethical issues depicted (...)
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  32.  4
    Terrance MacMullan (2009). Habits of Whiteness. Indiana University Press.
    Revitalizing the work of W. E. B. Du Bois and John Dewey, MacMullan shows how it is possible to reconstruct racial habits and close the gap between people.
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  33.  2
    Terrance MacMullan (2009). Habits of Whiteness: A Pragmatist Reconstruction. Indiana University Press.
    Habits of Whiteness offers a new way to talk about race and racism by focusing on racial habits and how to change them. According to Terrance MacMullan, the concept of racial whiteness has undermined attempts to create a truly democratic society in the United States. By getting to the core of the racism that lives on in unrecognized habits, MacMullan argues clearly and charitably for white folk to recognize the distance between their color-blind ideals and their actual (...)
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  34.  2
    Terrance MacMullan (2009). Habits of Whiteness: A Pragmatist Reconstruction. Indiana University Press.
    Habits of Whiteness offers a new way to talk about race and racism by focusing on racial habits and how to change them. According to Terrance MacMullan, the concept of racial whiteness has undermined attempts to create a truly democratic society in the United States. By getting to the core of the racism that lives on in unrecognized habits, MacMullan argues clearly and charitably for white folk to recognize the distance between their color-blind ideals and their actual (...)
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  35.  2
    Majda Schmidt & Helena Čreslovnik (2010). Learning Habits of Students with Special Needs in Short‐Term Vocational Education Programmes. Educational Studies 36 (4):415-430.
    This research examined some characteristics of the learning habits of students with special needs and those without them in programmes of short?term vocational education in five areas: motivation, learning and learning techniques, emotional, social and the area of self?evaluation. The research sample consisted of 140 students from different secondary schools. The Questionnaire on the Learning Habits of Adolescents was used for the purpose of the study. The differences between the means from individual learning habit scales, between the students (...)
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  36.  6
    Helen Ngo (2016). Racist Habits A Phenomenological Analysis of Racism and the Habitual Body. Philosophy and Social Criticism 42 (9):847-872.
    This article examines how the phenomenological concept of habit can be productively deployed in the analysis of racism, in order to propose a reframing of the problem. Racism does not unfold primarily in the register of conscious thought or action, I argue, but more intimately and insidiously in the register of bodily habit. This claim, however, relies on a reading of habit as bodily orientation – or habituation – as developed by Merleau-Ponty in the Phenomenology of Perception. Drawing on his (...)
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  37.  15
    Steven Levine (2015). Hegel, Dewey, and Habits. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (4):632-656.
    In this paper, I argue against Terry Pinkard's account of the relation between Deweyian pragmatism and Hegelian idealism. Instead of thinking that their affinity concerns the issue of normative authority, as Pinkard does, I argue that we should trace their affinity to Dewey's appropriation of Hegel's naturalism, especially his theory of habits. Pinkard is not in a position to appreciate this affinity because he misreads Dewey as an instrumentalist, and his social-constructivist account of Hegel – which he shares with (...)
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  38.  1
    U. Dhar, S. Parashar & T. Tiwari (2008). Profession and Dietary Habits as Determinants of Perceived and Expected Values: An Empirical Study. Journal of Human Values 14 (2):181-190.
    The term value may be defined as a principle or ideal of intrinsic worth or desirability. Values and attitudes relate a property of an external object with an internal process . People impute worth or value onto objects, principles or ideals. The values are preferences, criteria or choices of personal or group conduct. They are general principles that guide an individual's decisions. These principles have an inherent organization and a rational basis to impart worth to objects and other individuals. As (...)
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  39.  8
    Thomas Hibbs (2005). Habits of the Heart. International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (2):203-220.
    In contrast to the fairly entrenched interpretation of Pascal as a fideist who repudiates reason, and perhaps even ethics, in order to render religious faith the only viable option, this essay argues that an ethics of thought or belief pervades Pascal’s apology for the Christian faith. The ethics of thought is a topic much neglected among Pascal’s commentators but of great interest to contemporary virtue epistemologists and philosophers of religion. The central themes in Pascal’s ethics of thought emerge partly from (...)
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  40.  19
    Robert Ehrlich (1985). Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (64):180-188.
    Perhaps no work which describes the American people is so comprehensive as Toqueville's Democracy in America. Bellah et. al. rely heavily upon Toqueville in Habits of the Heart in exploring how the mores of the American people have helped to shape national character. More particularly, they are interested in how Americans attempt “to preserve or create a morally coherent life” (p. 275). But unlike Toqueville for whom the issue of equality was central, Bellah and his co-authors focus their attention (...)
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  41.  33
    Thomas A. Lewis (2007). Speaking of Habits. The Owl of Minerva 39 (1-2):25-53.
    Hegel’s account of habit plays a vital, though often overlooked, role in his philosophical anthropology as well as his ethical thought. Although first introduced in relation to basic physical capacities, habituation reappears in his account of language and in the unconscious appropriation of ethical life. Because acting out of habit is not acting freely, our freedom depends upon the abilit y to reflect consciously on our habits—which for Hegel requires articulating them in language. Contrasting Hegel with Bourdieu on the (...)
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  42.  41
    Bill Pollard (2006). Actions, Habits and Constitution. Ratio 19 (2):229–248.
    In this paper I offer a critique of the view made popular by Davidson that rationalization is a species of causal explanation, and propose instead that in many cases the explanatory relation is constitutive. Given Davidson’s conception of rationalization, which allows that a huge range of states gathered under the heading ‘pro attitude’ could rationalize an action, I argue that whilst the causal thesis may have some merit for some such ‘attitudes’, it has none for others. The problematic ‘attitudes’ are (...)
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  43.  1
    Øyvind F. Standal & Kenneth Aggerholm (2016). Habits, Skills and Embodied Experiences: A Contribution to Philosophy of Physical Education. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (3):269-282.
    One of the main topics in philosophical work dealing with physical education is if and how the subject can justify its educational value. Acquisition of practical knowledge in the form of skills and the provision of positive and meaningful embodied experiences are central to the justification of physical education. The purpose of this article is to explore the relationship between skill and embodied experience in physical education through the notion and concept of habit. The literature on phenomenology of skill acquisition (...)
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  44.  26
    Christos Kyriacou (2012). Habits-Expressivism About Epistemic Justification. Philosophical Papers 41 (2):209 - 237.
    Abstract Although expressivist theories have been applied to many normative discourses (moral, rationality, knowledge, etc.), the normative discourse of epistemic justification has been somewhat neglected by expressivists. In this paper, I aspire to both remedy this unfortunate situation and introduce a novel version of expressivist theory: Habits-Expressivism. To pave the way for habits-expressivism, I turn to Allan Gibbard's (1990, 2003, 2008) seminal work on expressivism. I first examine Gibbard's (2003, 2008) late plan-reliance expressivism and argue that it faces (...)
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  45.  11
    Elisa Freschi (2015). Quotations, References, Etc. A Glance on the Writing Habits of a Late Mīmāṃsaka. Journal of Indian Philosophy 43 (2-3):219-255.
    Rāmānujācārya’s Tantrarahasya, a philosophical treatise mainly dedicated to the hermeneutics and epistemology of the Pūrva Mīmāṃsā School, might be considered hardly more than a jigsaw of reused passages, since one third of it has a direct source, and a further third has its roots in interlanguage usage. It is thus a perfect case study for investigating the compositional habits of philosophical authors in pre-modern śāstra literature. The article analyses the formal aspects of textual reuse by Rāmānujācārya and draws some (...)
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  46.  29
    Annemarie Butler (2010). Vulgar Habits and Hume's Double Vision Argument. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (2):169-187.
    In Treatise 1.4.2, David Hume seeks to explain how we come to believe in the external existence of bodies. He offers a complicated psychological account, where the imagination operates on the raw data of the senses to produce the ‘vulgar’ belief in the continued existence of the very things we sense. On behalf of philosophers, he presents a perceptual relativity argument that purports to show that the vulgar belief is false. I argue that scholars have failed to appreciate Hume's peculiar (...)
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  47. des Chene, From Habits to Traces.
    Experience makes its mark on us in many ways. It leaves traces; it instills habits. A trace, as I define it here, is a quality of the soul or mind which is distinguished by its content, its intentional object. Aristotelian species and Cartesian ideas are traces. A habit I take, following Suárez, to be a quality of the soul which assists in the acts of a power of the soul, enabling them to be performed more easily and promptly. I (...)
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  48.  19
    Oliver Leaman (1999). Time, Modernity, and Destructive Habits of Thought. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (Supplement):127-145.
    (1999). Time, Modernity, and Destructive Habits of Thought. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 29, Supplementary Volume 25: Civilization and Oppression, pp. 127-145.
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  49.  9
    Griffin Trotter (2002). Of Terrorism and Healthcare: Jolting the Old Habits. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (4):411-414.
    Old habits die slowly. Hence there is little surprise that attorneys fashioning the Model State Emergency Health Powers Act preserved much of their own standard operating procedure. This model statute was designed for the worst of times—for horrific scenarios in which terrorism, infectious disease, or natural calamity threaten to derail the machinery of civilization while snuffing out thousands or even millions of human lives. Such grave threats seem to justify grave measures aimed at restoring order and maximizing survival. So, (...)
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  50.  5
    Jeanne Morefield (2009). Harold Laski on the Habits of Imperialism. Proceedings of the British Academy 155:213-237.
    Since his death in the 1950s, most of the narratives of Harold Laski’s anti-imperialism have been mostly biographical rather than scholarly. Chroniclers and historians alike often found his genius and contribution amongst his protégés such as Krishna Menon, H.O. Davies, and other post-colonial leaders. In addition, explorations of his political theories paid little attention to his contributions to critiques on imperialism; in fact, his critics often interpreted Laski’s stand on imperialism as unoriginal. This chapter analyses two of Laski’s works on (...)
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