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  1. Nina Gierasimczuk, Han L. J. Van der Maas & Maartje E. J. Raijmakers (2013). An Analytic Tableaux Model for Deductive Mastermind Empirically Tested with a Massively Used Online Learning System. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 22 (3):297-314.
    The paper is concerned with the psychological relevance of a logical model for deductive reasoning. We propose a new way to analyze logical reasoning in a deductive version of the Mastermind game implemented within a popular Dutch online educational learning system (Math Garden). Our main goal is to derive predictions about the difficulty of Deductive Mastermind tasks. By means of a logical analysis we derive the number of steps needed for solving these tasks (a proxy for working memory load). Our (...)
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  2. Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Han L. J. van der Maas & Simon Farrell (2012). Abstract Concepts Require Concrete Models: Why Cognitive Scientists Have Not Yet Embraced Nonlinearly Coupled, Dynamical, Self-Organized Critical, Synergistic, Scale-Free, Exquisitely Context-Sensitive, Interaction-Dominant, Multifractal, Interdependent Brain-Body-Niche Systems. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):87-93.
    After more than 15 years of study, the 1/f noise or complex-systems approach to cognitive science has delivered promises of progress, colorful verbiage, and statistical analyses of phenomena whose relevance for cognition remains unclear. What the complex-systems approach has arguably failed to deliver are concrete insights about how people perceive, think, decide, and act. Without formal models that implement the proposed abstract concepts, the complex-systems approach to cognitive science runs the danger of becoming a philosophical exercise in futility. The complex-systems (...)
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  3. Gilles Dutilh, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Ingmar Visser & Han L. J. van der Maas (2011). A Phase Transition Model for the Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off in Response Time Experiments. Cognitive Science 35 (2):211-250.
    Most models of response time (RT) in elementary cognitive tasks implicitly assume that the speed-accuracy trade-off is continuous: When payoffs or instructions gradually increase the level of speed stress, people are assumed to gradually sacrifice response accuracy in exchange for gradual increases in response speed. This trade-off presumably operates over the entire range from accurate but slow responding to fast but chance-level responding (i.e., guessing). In this article, we challenge the assumption of continuity and propose a phase transition model for (...)
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  4. Philip T. Quinlan, Han L. J. van der Maas, Brenda R. J. Jansen, Olaf Booij & Mark Rendell (2007). Re-Thinking Stages of Cognitive Development: An Appraisal of Connectionist Models of the Balance Scale Task. Cognition 103 (3):413-459.
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  5. Han L. J. van der Maas, Philip T. Quinlan & Brenda R. J. Jansen (2007). Towards Better Computational Models of the Balance Scale Task: A Reply to Shultz and Takane. Cognition 103 (3):473-479.
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  6. Peter C. M. Molenaar & Han L. J. van der Maas (2000). Neural Constructivism or Self-Organization? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):783-784.
    Three arguments are given to show that neural constructivism lacks an essential ingredient to explain cognitive development. Based on results in the theory of adaptive signal analysis, adaptive biological pattern information and self-organization in nonlinear systems of information processing, it is concluded that neural constructivism should be further extended to accommodate the occurrence of phase transitions generating qualitative development in the sense of Piaget.
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