Search results for 'Happiness Bibliography' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Noel Harold Kaylor (1992). The Medieval Consolation of Philosophy: An Annotated Bibliography. Garland Pub..
     
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  2. L. W. Sumner (1996). Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Moral philosophers agree that welfare matters. But they disagree about what it is, or how much it matters. In this vital new work, Wayne Sumner presents an original theory of welfare, investigating its nature and discussing its importance. He considers and rejects all notable theories of welfare, both objective and subjective, including hedonism and theories founded on desire or preference. His own theory connects welfare closely with happiness or life satisfaction. Reacting against the value pluralism that currently dominates moral (...)
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  3. Julia Annas (1993). The Morality of Happiness. Oxford University Press.
    Ancient ethical theories, based on the notions of virtue and happiness, have struck many as an attractive alternative to modern theories. But we cannot find out whether this is true until we understand ancient ethics--and to do this we need to examine the basic structure of ancient ethical theory, not just the details of one or two theories. In this book, Annas brings together the results of a wide-ranging study of ancient ethical philosophy and presents it in a way (...)
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  4. John Stuart Mill (2009). Utilitarianism. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press
    The Oxford Philosophical Texts series consists of authoritative teaching editions of canonical texts in the history of philosophy from the ancient world down to modern times. Each volume provides a clear, well laid out text together with a comprehensive introduction by a leading specialist, providing the student with detailed critical guidance on the intellectual context of the work and the structure and philosophical importance of the main arguments. Endnotes are supplied which provide further commentary on the arguments and explain unfamiliar (...)
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  5. Edoardo Zamuner (2008). “Face Value. Perception and Knowledge Others’ Happiness”. In Lisa Bortolotti (ed.), The Philosophy of Happiness. Palgrave
    Happiness, like other basic emotions, has visual properties that create the conditions for happiness to be perceived in others. This is to say that happiness is perceivable. Its visual properties are to be identified with those facial expressions that are characteristic of happiness. Yet saying that something is perceivable does not suffice for us to conclude that it is perceived. We therefore need to show that happiness is perceived. Empirical evidence suggests that the visual system (...)
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  6.  64
    Sara Ahmed (2010). The Promise of Happiness. Duke University Press.
    Introduction: why happiness, why now? -- Happy objects -- Feminist killjoys -- Unhappy queers -- Melancholic migrants -- Happy futures -- Conclusion: happiness, ethics, possibility.
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  7. Fred Feldman (2010). What is This Thing Called Happiness? Oxford University Press.
    Some puzzles about happiness -- Pt. I. Some things that happiness isn't. Sensory hedonism about happiness -- Kahneman's "objective happiness" -- Subjective local preferentism about happiness -- Whole life satisfaction concepts of happiness -- Pt. II. What happiness is. What is this thing called happiness? -- Attitudinal hedonism about happiness -- Eudaimonism -- The problem of inauthentic happiness -- Disgusting happiness -- Our authority over our own happiness (...)
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  8. Antti Kauppinen (2013). Meaning and Happiness. Philosophical Topics 41 (1):161-185.
    What is the relationship between meaning in life and happiness? In psychological research, subjective meaning and happiness are often contrasted with each other. I argue that while the objective meaningfulness of a life is distinct from happiness, subjective or felt meaning is a key constituent of happiness, which is best understood as a multidimensional affective condition. Measures of felt meaning should consequently be included in empirical studies of the causes and correlates of happiness.
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  9.  29
    Patrick Brissey (2015). Reflections on Descartes’ Vocation as an Early Theory of Happiness. Journal of Early Modern Studies 4 (2):69-91.
    In this paper, I argue that Descartes developed an early theory of happiness, which he rhetorically claimed to have stemmed from his choice of vocation in 1619. I provide a sketch of his theory in the Discours, noting, however, some problems with the historicity of the text. I then turn to his Olympica and associated writings that date from this period, where he literally asked, “What way in life shall I follow?” I take Descartes’ dreams as allegorical and provide (...)
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  10. Daniel M. Haybron (2001). Happiness and Pleasure. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):501-528.
    This paper argues against hedonistic theories of happiness. First, hedonism is too inclusive: many pleasures cannot plausibly be construed as constitutive of happiness. Second, any credible theory must count either attitudes of life satisfaction, affective states such as mood, or both as constituents of happiness; yet neither sort of state reduces to pleasure. Hedonism errs in its attempt to reduce happiness, which is at least partly dispositional, to purely episodic experiential states. The dispositionality of happiness (...)
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  11.  69
    Erik Angner (2013). Is It Possible to Measure Happiness? European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (2):221-240.
    A ubiquitous argument against mental-state accounts of well-being is based on the notion that mental states like happiness and satisfaction simply cannot be measured. The purpose of this paper is to articulate and to assess this “argument from measurability.” My main thesis is that the argument fails: on the most charitable interpretation, it relies on the false proposition that measurement requires the existence of an observable ordering satisfying conditions like transitivity. The failure of the argument from measurability, however, does (...)
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  12.  31
    Matt Stichter (2015). Paul Bloomfield, The Virtues of Happiness: A Theory of the Good Life. Reviewed by Matt Stichter. Social Theory and Practice 41 (3):567-574.
    Paul Bloomfield’s latest book, The Virtues of Happiness, is an excellent discussion of what constitutes living the Good Life. It is a self-admittedly ambitious book, as he seeks to show that people who act immorally necessarily fall short of living well. Instead of arguing that immorality is inherently irrational, he puts it in terms of it being inherently harmful in regards to one’s ability to achieve the Good Life. It’s ambitious because he tries to argue this starting from grounds (...)
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  13.  48
    Hon-Lam Li (2011). On Happiness. World Policy Journal:4-5.
    I argue that "quality of life" can be understood in three main ways: as purchasing power, together with social and political goods; as the subjective state of mind: happiness; happiness as related to the meaningfulness of one's profession or cause.
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  14.  92
    David Forman (2016). Kant’s Moderate Cynicism and the Harmony Between Virtue and Worldly Happiness. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):75-109.
    For Kant, any authentic moral demands are wholly distinct from the demands of prudence. This has led critics to complain that Kantian moral demands are incompatible with our human nature as happiness-seekers. Kant’s defenders have pointed out, correctly, that Kant can and does assert that it is permissible, at least in principle, to pursue our own happiness. But this response does not eliminate the worry that a life organized around the pursuit of virtue might turn out to be (...)
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  15.  19
    Peter Roberts (2013). Happiness, Despair and Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (5):463-475.
    In today’s world we appear to place a premium on happiness. Happiness is often portrayed, directly or indirectly, as one of the key aims of education. To suggest that education is concerned with promoting unhappiness or even despair would, in many contexts, seem outlandish. This paper challenges these widely held views. Focusing on the work of the great Russian writer, Fyodor Dostoevsky, I argue that despair, the origins of which lie in our reflective consciousness, is a defining feature (...)
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  16.  49
    Sean A. Weaver & Michael C. Morris (2005). Risks Associated with Genetic Modification: – An Annotated Bibliography of Peer Reviewed Natural Science Publications. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (2):157-189.
    We present an annotated bibliography of peer reviewed scientific research highlighting the human health, animal welfare, and environmental risks associated with genetic modification. Risks associated with the expression of the transgenic material include concerns over resistance and non-target effects of crops expressing Bt toxins, consequences of herbicide use associated with genetically modified herbicide-tolerant plants, and transfer of gene expression from genetically modified crops through vertical and horizontal gene transfer. These risks are not connected to the technique of genetic modification (...)
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  17. Daniel M. Haybron (2003). What Do We Want From a Theory of Happiness? Metaphilosophy 34 (3):305-329.
    In this paper I defend a methodology for theorizing about happiness conceived as a type of psychological state. I reject three methods: conceptual or linguistic analysis; scientific naturalism—deferring to our best scientific theories of happiness; and what I call the “pure normative adequacy” approach, according to which the best conception of happiness is the one that best fulfills a particular role in moral theory (e.g., utility). The concept of happiness is foremost a folk notion employed by (...)
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  18. Anthony Skelton (2013). Review of Fred Feldman, What is This Thing Called Happiness? [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):395-398.
    A critical review of Fred Feldman's What is This Thing Called Happiness? which includes a partial defence of the life satisfaction theory of happiness.
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  19.  60
    Matthew J. Kisner (2011). Spinoza on Human Freedom: Reason, Autonomy and the Good Life. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Abbreviations and translations; Introduction: beyond therapy; 1. Freedom as rationality; 2. Justifying Spinoza's conception of freedom; 3. Autonomy and responsibility; 4. Freedom and happiness; 5. The good; 6. The natural law; 7. Benevolence; 8. The free man; 9. Rational deliberation; 10. The character of freedom; 11. The freedom of the citizen; Conclusion: 'the true freedom of man'; Bibliography; Index.
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  20.  4
    Bertrand Russell (2006). The Conquest of Happiness. Routledge.
    The Conquest of Happiness is Bertrand Russell’s recipe for good living. First published in 1930, it pre-dates the current obsession with self-help by decades. Leading the reader step by step through the causes of unhappiness and the personal choices, compromises and sacrifices that lead to the final, affirmative conclusion of ‘The Happy Man’, this is popular philosophy, or even self-help, as it should be written.
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  21.  99
    Finn Janning (2014). The Happiness of Burnout. Journal of Philosophy of Life 4 (1):48-67.
    In the novel A Burnout-Out Case, Graham Greene argues for an intimate relationship between burnout and happiness. The novel claims that a life worth living is a continuous balancing between something painful, e.g. burnout and something desirable, e.g. happiness. In this essay, I try to make a case for the happiness of burnout. By examining the case story of a young artist, who suffered from burnout, I describe how such suffering might open up for a necessary reevaluation (...)
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  22. Fred Feldman (2008). Whole Life Satisfaction Concepts of Happiness. Theoria 74 (3):219-238.
    The most popular <span class='Hi'>concepts</span> of <span class='Hi'>happiness</span> among psychologists and philosophers nowadays are <span class='Hi'>concepts</span> of <span class='Hi'>happiness</span> according to which <span class='Hi'>happiness</span> is defined as "<span class='Hi'>satisfaction</span> with <span class='Hi'>life</span> as a <span class='Hi'>whole</span>". Such <span class='Hi'>concepts</span> are "<span class='Hi'>Whole</span> <span class='Hi'>Life</span> <span class='Hi'>Satisfaction</span>" (WLS) <span class='Hi'>concepts</span> of <span class='Hi'>happiness</span>. I show that there are hundreds of non-equivalent ways in which a WLS conception of <span class='Hi'>happiness</span> can be developed. However, every precise conception (...)
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  23.  40
    Edward Skidelsky (2014). What Can We Learn From Happiness Surveys? Journal of Practical Ethics 2 (2):20-32.
    Defenders of happiness surveys often claim that individuals are infallible judges of their own happiness. I argue that this claim is untrue. Happiness, like other emotions, has three features that make it vulnerable to introspective error: it is dispositional, it is intentional, and it is publically manifest. Other defenders of the survey method claim, more modestly, that individuals are in general reliable judges of their own happiness. I argue that this is probably true, but that it (...)
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  24.  29
    Herbert McCabe (2005). The Good Life: Ethics and the Pursuit of Happiness. Continuum.
    The Dalai Lama once wrote that the object of human existence was to be happy. This sounds extremely glib as happiness in the popular imagination is a feeling and in the words of the song 'the greatest gift that we possess'. On the other hand, von Hugel wrote 'Religion has never made me happy;it's no use shutting your eyes to the fact that the deeper you go, the more alone you will find yourself' This small masterpiece by the late (...)
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  25.  5
    Bernd Buldt (2016). Johannes von Kries: A Bio-Bibliography. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 47 (1):217-235.
    A short biography of Johannes von Kries, followed by a bibliography of his works, containing more than 70 previously unknown works.
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  26.  4
    Daniel C. Russell (2012). Happiness for Humans. Oxford University Press.
    In Happiness for Humans , Daniel C. Russell takes a fresh look at happiness from a practical perspective: the perspective of someone trying to solve the wonderful problem of how to give himself a good life. From this perspective, "happiness" is the name of a solution to that problem for practical deliberation. Russell's approach to happiness falls within a tradition that reaches back to ancient Greek and Roman philosophers--a tradition now called "eudaimonism." Beginning with Aristotle's seminal (...)
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  27. Steven M. Cahn & Christine Vitrano (eds.) (2007). Happiness: Classic and Contemporary Readings in Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This book will be the first collection of classic and contemporary readings devoted to the subject of happiness. Part I will include classic readings from Plato to Sartre, thus providing a brief tour of the most important theories of ethics and emphasizing their approaches to happiness. Part II will be devoted to the work of contemporary theorists who have sought to grasp the concept of happiness from a variety of perspectives.
     
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  28.  44
    Jussi Suikkanen (2011). An Improved Whole Life Satisfaction Theory of Happiness. International Journal of Wellbeing 1 (1):149-166.
    According to the popular Whole Life Satisfaction theories of happiness, an agent is happy when she judges that her life fulfils her ideal life-plan. Fred Feldman has recently argued that such views cannot accommodate the happiness of spontaneous or pre-occupied agents who do not consider how well their lives are going. In this paper, I formulate a new Whole Life Satisfaction theory which can deal with this problem. My proposal is inspired by Michael Smith’s advice-model of desirability. According (...)
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  29.  2
    Stephanie M. Hare & Nicole A. Vincent (2016). Happiness, Cerebroscopes and Incorrigibility: Prospects for Neuroeudaimonia. Neuroethics 9 (1):69-84.
    Suppose you want to live a happy life. Who should you turn to for advice? We normally think that we know best about our own happiness. But recent work in psychology and neuroscience suggests that we are often mistaken about our own natures, and that sometimes scientists know us better than we know ourselves. Does this mean that to live a happy life we should ask scientists for advice rather than relying on our introspection? In what follows, we highlight (...)
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  30.  42
    Frans Svensson (2011). Happiness, Well-Being, and Their Relation to Virtue in Descartes' Ethics. Theoria 77 (3):238-260.
    My main thesis in this article is that Descartes' ethics should be understood as involving a distinction between happiness and well-being. The distinction I have in mind is never clearly stated or articulated by Descartes himself, but I argue that we nevertheless have good reason to embrace it as an important component in a charitable reconstruction of his ethical thought. In section I, I present Descartes' account of happiness and of how he thinks happiness can (and cannot) (...)
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  31.  35
    Shelley M. Park (2005). In Defense of Happiness: Presidential Address to the Florida Philosophical Association. Florida Philosophical Review 4 (1):1-15.
    In this address, I defend happiness as a disposition conducive to, or at least compatible with, a view of the world that is both cognitively and politically valuable, that is, both conducive to truth and ethically appropriate.
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  32. Lisa Bortolotti (ed.) (2009). Philosophy and Happiness. Palgrave MacMillan.
    Philosophy and Happiness addresses the need to situate any meaningful discourse about happiness in a wider context of human interests, capacities and circumstances. How is happiness manifested and expressed? Can there be any happiness if no worthy life projects are pursued? How is happiness affected by relationships, illness, or cultural variants? Can it be reduced to preference satisfaction? Is it a temporary feeling or a persistent way of being? Is reflection conducive to happiness? Is (...)
     
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  33.  30
    Neven Leddy & Avi Lifschitz (eds.) (2009). Epicurus in the Enlightenment. Voltaire Foundation.
    Eighteenth-century Epicureanism is often viewed as radical, anti-religious, and politically dangerous. But to what extent does this simplify the ancient philosophy and underestimate its significance to the Enlightenment? Through a pan-European analysis of Enlightenment centres from Scotland to Russia via the Netherlands, France and Germany, contributors argue that elements of classical Epicureanism were appropriated by radical and conservative writers alike. They move beyond literature and political theory to examine the application of Epicurean ideas in domains as diverse as physics, natural (...)
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  34.  42
    Mick Power (2013). Well-Being, Quality of Life, and the Naïve Pursuit of Happiness. Topoi 32 (2):145-152.
    The pursuit of happiness is a long-enshrined tradition that has recently become the cornerstone of the American Positive Psychology movement. However, “happiness” is an over-worked and ambiguous word, which, it is argued, should be restricted and only used as the label for a brief emotional state that typically lasts a few seconds or minutes. The corollary proposal for positive psychology is that optimism is a preferable stance over pessimism or realism. Examples are presented both from psychology and economics (...)
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  35.  65
    Limin Bao (2011). “Justice is Happiness”?—An Analysis of Plato's Strategies in Response to Challenges From the Sophists. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):258-272.
    The challenge from the sophists with whom Plato is confronted is: Who can prove that the just man without power is happy whereas the unjust man with power is not? This challenge concerns the basic issue of politics: the relationship between justice and happiness. Will the unjust man gain the exceptional happiness of the strong by abusing his power and by injustice? The gist of Plato’s reply is to speak not of justice but of intrinsic justice, i.e., the (...)
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  36.  71
    Shaoming Chen (2010). On Pleasure: A Reflection on Happiness From the Confucian and Daoist Perspectives. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):179-195.
    This paper discusses the structural relationship between ideals on pleasure and pleasure as a human psychological phenomenon in Chinese thought. It describes the psychological phenomenon of pleasure, and compares different approaches by pre-Qin Confucian and Daoist scholars. It also analyzes its development in Song and Ming Confucianism. Finally, in the conclusion, the issue is transferred to a general understanding of happiness, so as to demonstrate the modern value of the classical ideological experience.
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  37.  34
    Massimo Baldi (2013). Wittgenstein and Aesthetics: A Bibliography. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):307-322.
    In these pages the reader will find a bibliography whose subject is the relationship between Wittgenstein’s Work and Aesthetics in the range of years 1960-2012.
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  38. Anthony Kenny (2006). Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Utility: Happiness in Philosophical and Economic Thought. Imprint Academic.
    A volume on nature, ingredients, causes and consequences of human happiness by father and son team of Antony and Charles Kenny.
     
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  39.  9
    Anthony Kenny (1973). The Anatomy of the Soul. [Oxford]Basil Blackwell.
    Mental health in Plato's Republic.--The practical syllogism and incontinence.--Aristotle on happiness.--Intellect and imagination in Aquinas.--Descartes on the will.--Cartesian privacy.--Appendix: The history of intention in ethics.--Bibliography (p. [147]).
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  40.  2
    Jordan McKenzie (2015). Happiness Vs Contentment? A Case for a Sociology of the Good Life. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Despite the enormous growth in happiness research in recent decades, there remains a lack of consistency in the use of the terms happiness, satisfaction, contentment and well-being. In this article I argue for a sociologically grounded distinction between happiness and contentment that defines the former as positive affect and the latter as positive reflection. Contentment is therefore understood as a fulfilling relationship with the self and society and happiness involves pleasurable experiences. There is a history of (...)
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  41.  43
    Severin V. Kitanov (2011). Happiness in a Mechanistic Universe: Thomas Hobbes on the Nature and Attainability of Happiness. Hobbes Studies 24 (2):117-136.
    The article revisits the originality of Hobbes's concept of happiness on the basis of Hobbes's two accounts found respectively in Thomas White's De Mundo Examined and Leviathan. It is argued that Hobbes's claim that happiness consists in the unhindered advance from one acquired good to another ought to be understood against the background of Hobbes's theory of sensation and the imagination, on the one hand, and Hobbes's doctrine of conatus, on the other. It is further claimed that the (...)
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  42.  27
    Massimo Baldini (2013). Wittgenstein and Aesthetics: A Bibliography. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):307-322.
    In these pages the reader will find a bibliography whose subject is the relationship between Wittgenstein’s Work and Aesthetics in the range of years 1960-2012.
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  43.  6
    Mark E. Jonas (2016). Rousseau on Sex-Roles, Education and Happiness. Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (2):145-161.
    Over the last decade, philosophers of education have begun taking a renewed interest in Rousseau’s educational thought. This is a welcome development as his ideas are rich with educational insights. His philosophy is not without its flaws, however. One significant flaw is his educational project for females, which is sexist in the highest degree. Rousseau argues that females should be taught to “please men…and make [men’s] lives agreeable and sweet.” The question becomes how could Rousseau make such strident claims, especially (...)
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  44. Raffaele Rodogno (2014). Happiness and Well-Being: Shifting the Focus of the Current Debate. South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):433-446.
    The point of departure of this paper is the recently emphasised distinction between psychological theories of happiness, on the one hand, and normative theories of well-being, on the other. With this distinction in mind, I examine three possible kinds of relation that might exist between (psychological) happiness and (normative) well-being; to wit, happiness may be understood as playing a central part in (1) a formal theory of well-being, (2) a substantive theory of well-being or (3) as an (...)
     
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  45.  15
    Donnapat Jaiwong & Vanchai Ariyabuddhiphongs (2010). Observance of the Buddhist Five Precepts, Subjective Wealth, and Happiness Among Buddhists in Bangkok, Thailand. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 32 (3):327-344.
    This study tests the Buddhist hypothesis that observance of Buddhist Five Precepts leads to subjective wealth, and happiness. Gotama Buddha defined happiness as the result of subjective wealth: having wealth, using wealth, not being in debt, and engaging in a harmless profession. Four hundred residents of Bangkok participated in the study by responding to scales assessing the extent of their observance of the Five Precepts, subjective wealth, and domain satisfactions and life satisfaction. Regression analyses were used to test (...)
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  46.  7
    Jan Zygmunt & Robert Purdy (2014). Adolf Lindenbaum: Notes on His Life, with Bibliography and Selected References. Logica Universalis 8 (3-4):285-320.
    Notes on the life of Adolf Lindenbaum, a complete bibliography of his published works, and selected references to his unpublished results.
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  47.  22
    Matthew Cashen (2012). Happiness,Eudaimonia, and The Principle of Descriptive Adequacy. Metaphilosophy 43 (5):619-635.
    Historically, philosophers have identified happiness with, among other things, pleasure, contentment, desire satisfaction, and, if we count the Greek eudaimonia as happiness, the life of virtue. When faced with competing theories of happiness, we need a way to decide which theory is more accurate. According to Larry Wayne Sumner's principle of descriptive adequacy, the best theory of happiness is the theory that best describes our ordinary, pretheoretical beliefs and intuitions. The chief aim of this article is (...)
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  48.  3
    Sean Meseroll, Happiness and Welfare.
    In this dissertation I argue that while hedonism seems to be the correct theory of happiness, happiness does not seem to be the essence of welfare; after all, it appears that a person may be brainwashed over a given duration, may be happy over that same duration, but not also be well off over that duration, all things considered; this suggests that well-being consists of capacity-fulfillment. Hedonism about happiness, maintains that you are happy to (...)
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  49.  3
    Victoria S. Wike (1994). Kant on Happiness in Ethics. State University of New York Press.
    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of Kant's treatment of happiness in ethics.
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  50.  60
    Stephen A. White (1992). Sovereign Virtue: Aristotle on the Relation Between Happiness and Prosperity. Stanford University Press.
    The central subject of Aristotle's ethics is happiness or living well. Most people in his day (as in ours), eager to enjoy life, impressed by worldly success, and fearful of serious loss, believed that happiness depends mainly on fortune in achieving prosperity and avoiding adversity. Aristotle, however, argues that virtuous conduct is the governing factor in living well and attaining happiness. While admitting that neither the blessings not the afflictions of fortune are unimportant, he maintains that the (...)
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