Search results for 'Happiness History' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  13
    Ziyad Marar (2005). Elusive Pursuits: A Brief History of Happiness. Think 3 (9):101-109.
    Ziyad Marar presents a brief history of the quest for happiness, and of its relation to philosophy.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  2
    Rosslyn Ives (2013). Murphy's Law and the Pursuit of Happiness: A History of the Civil Celebrant Movement [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 112:23.
    Ives, Rosslyn Review of: Murphy's law and the pursuit of happiness: A history of the civil celebrant movement, by Dally Messenger III, Spectrum Publications, Melbourne 2012. $35 p and p.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Vivaldi Jean-Marie (2008). Kierkegaard: History and Eternal Happiness. Upa.
    Kierkegaard is an exegetical interpretation of Søren Kierkegaard's Philosophical Fragments and Concluding Unscientific Postscript. Vivaldi Jean-Marie elaborates on the philosophical and religious arguments of the pseudonym Johannes Climacus to demonstrate that history is propatory toward the achievement of eternal happiness. The author emphasizes Kierkegaard's heritage in the Post-Kantian tradition by discussing his critique of the Romantics and German Idealists. The exposition of Philosophical Fragments and Concluding Unscientific Postscript is carried out on the basis of the ongoing conversation between (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Nicholas White (2006). A Brief History of Happiness. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this brief history, philosopher Nicholas White reviews 2,500 years of philosophical thought about happiness. Addresses key questions such as: What is happiness? Should happiness play such a dominant role in our lives? How can we deal with conflicts between the various things that make us happy? Considers the ways in which major thinkers from antiquity to the modern day have treated happiness: from Plato’s notion of the harmony of the soul, through to Nietzsche’s championing (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Nicholas White (2008). A Brief History of Happiness. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this brief history, philosopher Nicholas White reviews 2,500 years of philosophical thought about happiness. Addresses key questions such as: What is happiness? Should happiness play such a dominant role in our lives? How can we deal with conflicts between the various things that make us happy? Considers the ways in which major thinkers from antiquity to the modern day have treated happiness: from Plato’s notion of the harmony of the soul, through to Nietzsche’s championing (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Nicholas White (2008). A Brief History of Happiness. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this brief history, philosopher Nicholas White reviews 2,500 years of philosophical thought about happiness. Addresses key questions such as: What is happiness? Should happiness play such a dominant role in our lives? How can we deal with conflicts between the various things that make us happy? Considers the ways in which major thinkers from antiquity to the modern day have treated happiness: from Plato’s notion of the harmony of the soul, through to Nietzsche’s championing (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Nicholas White (2006). A Brief History of Happiness. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this brief history, philosopher Nicholas White reviews 2,500 years of philosophical thought about happiness. Addresses key questions such as: What is happiness? Should happiness play such a dominant role in our lives? How can we deal with conflicts between the various things that make us happy? Considers the ways in which major thinkers from antiquity to the modern day have treated happiness: from Plato’s notion of the harmony of the soul, through to Nietzsche’s championing (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  18
    Darrin M. McMahon (2009). The History of Happiness and the Contemporary Happiness Studies.". In Amitava Krishna Dutt & Benjamin Radcliff (eds.), Happiness, Economics and Politics: Towards a Multi-Disciplinary Approach. Edward Elgar 25--32.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  34
    Daniel M. Haybron (2012). Review: Nicholas White,A Brief History of Happiness. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (3):729-732.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  16
    Bart Schultz (2007). Nicholas White, A Brief History of Happiness:A Brief History of Happiness. Ethics 117 (3):588-590.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  15
    Robert Barron (2007). A Brief History of Happiness. Review of Metaphysics 61 (1):167-169.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. N. Hinske (1978). Between Fortuna and Felicitas-Changing Notions of Happiness Throughout History. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 85 (2):317-330.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  61
    Stephen A. White (1992). Sovereign Virtue: Aristotle on the Relation Between Happiness and Prosperity. Stanford University Press.
    The central subject of Aristotle's ethics is happiness or living well. Most people in his day (as in ours), eager to enjoy life, impressed by worldly success, and fearful of serious loss, believed that happiness depends mainly on fortune in achieving prosperity and avoiding adversity. Aristotle, however, argues that virtuous conduct is the governing factor in living well and attaining happiness. While admitting that neither the blessings not the afflictions of fortune are unimportant, he maintains that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  15
    Vivasvan Soni (2011). Mourning Happiness: Narrative and the Politics of Modernity. Cornell University Press.
    Solon's cryptic injunction : "Call no man happy until dead" -- A mourning happiness : the Athenian funeral oration -- Difficult happiness : the case of tragedy -- Aristotle's hermeneutic of happiness : the first forgetting -- The trial narrative in Richardson's Pamela : suspending the hermeneutic of happiness -- Effects of the trial narrative on the concept of happiness -- Marriage plot -- The tragedies of sentimentalism -- Kantian ethics and the discourses of modernity (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Alan O. Ebenstein (1991). The Greatest Happiness Principle: An Examination of Utilitarianism. Garland.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16. Timothy A. Mitchell (1983). Hedonism and Eudemonism in Aquinas--Not the Same as Happiness. Franciscan Herald Press.
  17. Anthony Kenny (1992). Aristotle on the Perfect Life. Oxford University Press.
    An authoritative exposition of Aristotle's teaching on the subject of happiness, which is of vital importance to the question of the relevance of his ethics today. Kenny helped to set the terms of the debate 25 years ago. In his latest book, he refines his view on the relationship between the Nichomachean Ethics and the Eudemian Ethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  18.  4
    Jordan McKenzie (2015). Happiness Vs Contentment? A Case for a Sociology of the Good Life. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Despite the enormous growth in happiness research in recent decades, there remains a lack of consistency in the use of the terms happiness, satisfaction, contentment and well-being. In this article I argue for a sociologically grounded distinction between happiness and contentment that defines the former as positive affect and the latter as positive reflection. Contentment is therefore understood as a fulfilling relationship with the self and society and happiness involves pleasurable experiences. There is a history (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  20
    Beverley C. Southgate (2005). What is History For? Routledge.
    What is History For? is a timely publication that examines the purpose and point of historical studies. Recent debates on the role of the humanities and the ongoing impact of poststructuralist thought on the very nature of historical enquiry, have rendered the question "what is history for?" of utmost importance. Charting the development of historical studies, Beverley Southgate examines the various uses to which history has been put. While history has often supposedly been studied "for its (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Maria Bettetini & Francesco D. Paparella (eds.) (2005). Le Felicità Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S.I.S.P.M.) Milano, 12-13 Settembre 2003. [REVIEW] Brepols.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Maria Bettetini & Francesco D. Paparella (eds.) (2005). Le Felicità Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S. Brepols.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  2
    Wolfgang Rother (2005). La Maggiore Felicità Possibile: Untersuchungen Zur Philosophie der Aufklärung in Nord- Und Mittelitalien. Schwabe.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Paul Guyer (2000). Kant on Freedom, Law, and Happiness. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant is often portrayed as the author of a rigid system of ethics in which adherence to a formal and universal principle of morality - the famous categorical imperative - is an end itself, and any concern for human goals and happiness a strictly secondary and subordinate matter. Such a theory seems to suit perfectly rational beings but not human beings. The twelve essays in this collection by one of the world's preeminent Kant scholars argue for a radically different (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   38 citations  
  24. Jonathan Phillips, Sven Nyholm & Shen-yi Liao (2014). The Good in Happiness. In Tania Lombrozo, Shaun Nichols & Joshua Knobe (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy, Volume 1. Oxford University Press 253–293.
    There has been a long history of arguments over whether happiness is anything more than a particular set of psychological states. On one side, some philosophers have argued that there is not, endorsing a descriptive view of happiness. Affective scientists have also embraced this view and are reaching a near consensus on a definition of happiness as some combination of affect and life-satisfaction. On the other side, some philosophers have maintained an evaluative view of happiness, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25. David Forman (2016). Kant’s Moderate Cynicism and the Harmony Between Virtue and Worldly Happiness. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):75-109.
    For Kant, any authentic moral demands are wholly distinct from the demands of prudence. This has led critics to complain that Kantian moral demands are incompatible with our human nature as happiness-seekers. Kant’s defenders have pointed out, correctly, that Kant can and does assert that it is permissible, at least in principle, to pursue our own happiness. But this response does not eliminate the worry that a life organized around the pursuit of virtue might turn out to be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Sara Ahmed (2010). The Promise of Happiness. Duke University Press Books.
    _The Promise of Happiness_ is a provocative cultural critique of the imperative to be happy. It asks what follows when we make our desires and even our own happiness conditional on the happiness of others: “I just want you to be happy”; “I’m happy if you’re happy.” Combining philosophy and feminist cultural studies, Sara Ahmed reveals the affective and moral work performed by the “happiness duty,” the expectation that we will be made happy by taking part in (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  23
    Loyal D. Rue (1994). By the Grace of Guile: The Role of Deception in Natural History and Human Affairs. Oxford University Press.
    The nihilists are right, admits philosopher Loyal Rue. The universe is blind and aimless, indifferent to us and void of meaning. There are no absolute truths and no objective values. There is no right or wrong way to live, only alternative ways. There is no correct reading of a text or a picture or a dance. God is dead, nihilism reigns. But, Rue adds, nihilism is a truth inconsistent with personal happiness and social coherence. What we need instead is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  28. Sander L. Gilman (2010). "Happiness and Unhappiness as a" Jewish Question". Social Research: An International Quarterly 77 (2):545-568.
    Happiness is multiple, conflicting ideas - often changing from context to context with each change presaging a cascade of different meanings and interpretations. In this essay I shall try to link a number of them in a manner that is not causal but, I hope, rather evocative. I want to begin with a specific "Jewish" turn in the history of the concept of happiness at the close of the nineteenth century - one that turns out not to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Fred Feldman, Happiness: Empirical Research; Philosophical Conclusions.
    In recent years there has been a tremendous surge of academic interest in happiness. It seems that just about every week there is an announcement of a new book on the nature of happiness, or the measurement of happiness2, or the causes of happiness, or the history of happiness3. Some of these books have been written by philosophers. Others have been written by psychologists, economists, sociologists, and other empirical scientists.4 The surge of interest in happiness (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Anna Lannstrom (2006). Loving the Fine: Virtue and Happiness in Artistotle's Ethics. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Assuming that people want to be happy, can we show that they cannot be happy without being ethical, and that all rational people therefore should be able to see that it is in their own best interest to be ethical? Is it irrational to reject ethics? Aristotle thought so, claims Anna Lännström; but, she adds, he also thought that there was no way to prove it to a skeptic or an immoral person. Lännström probes Artistotle's view that desire is crucial (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  20
    Raymond J. Devettere (1993). Clinical Ethics and Happiness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (1):71-89.
    Most contemporary accounts of clinical ethics do not explain why clinicians should be ethical. Those few that do attempt an explanation usually claim that clinicians should be ethical because ethical behavior provides an important good for the patient – better care. Both these approaches ignore the customary traditional reason for being ethical, namely, the good of the moral agent. This good was commonly called ‘happiness’. The following article shows how the personal happiness of the moral agent provided a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  5
    Tuillang Yuing Alfaro & Mariela Cecilia Avila (2014). Nietzsche and history the unhappiness of the animal and the hope of man. Ideas Y Valores 63 (156):191-205.
    La Segunda consideration intempestiva delimita una relación funcional con la historia: esta beneficia a la vida cuando se posiciona desde una perspectiva ilusoria, disimulada y estratégica. Se analizan dos consecuencias: la crítica de la historia como ciencia objetiva y los matices que se desprenden de considerarla como relato. Si G. Agamben ha mostrado cómo la historia surge en el intersticio que hay entre lenguaje y discurso, el debate debe orientarse al proceso por el que la subjetividad adviene a un lenguaje (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  7
    Anna Wierzbicka (2010). The “History of Emotions” and the Future of Emotion Research. Emotion Review 2 (3):269-273.
    This article focuses on the emergence of a new subfield of emotion research known as “history of emotions.” People’s emotional lives depend on the construals which they impose on events, situations, and human actions. Different cultures and different languages suggest different habitual construals, and since habitual construals change over time, as a result, habitual feelings change, too. But to study construals we need a suitable methodology. The article assumes that such a methodology is provided by the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  4
    Cinara Nahra (2014). The Harm Principle and the Greatest Happiness Principle: The Missing Link. Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 55 (129):99-110.
    Neste artigo, apresento uma solução possível para o clássico problema da aparente incompatibilidade entre o Princípio da Maior Felicidade de John Stuart Mill e seu Princípio da Liberdade, argumentando que na esfera "concernente aos outros" os julgamentos de experiência e o conhecimento acumulado através da história têm força moral e legal, enquanto na esfera "autoconcernente" os julgamentos dos experientes têm apenas valor prudencial, e a razão para isto é a ideia que cada um de nós é um juiz, melhor do (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Sara Ahmed (2010). The Promise of Happiness. Duke University Press Books.
    _The Promise of Happiness_ is a provocative cultural critique of the imperative to be happy. It asks what follows when we make our desires and even our own happiness conditional on the happiness of others: “I just want you to be happy”; “I’m happy if you’re happy.” Combining philosophy and feminist cultural studies, Sara Ahmed reveals the affective and moral work performed by the “happiness duty,” the expectation that we will be made happy by taking part in (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Steven M. Cahn, Christine Vitrano & Robert Talisse (2015). Happiness and Goodness: Philosophical Reflections on Living Well. Cup.
    How should we evaluate the success of each person's life? Countering the prevalent philosophical perspective on the subject, Steven M. Cahn and Christine Vitrano defend the view that our well-being is dependent not on particular activities, accomplishments, or awards but on finding personal satisfaction while treating others with due concern. The authors suggest that moral behavior is not necessary for happiness and does not ensure it. Yet they also argue that morality and happiness are needed for living well, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. William Cooney (2015). The Wild Longing of the Human Heart: The Search for Happiness and Something More. Hamilton Books.
    This book is divided into two parts, part one examines the brief history of happiness and summarizes the latest information from the areas of brain science as well as the field of positive psychology. Part two proposes that it is not happiness which is the true goal of human living.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Marc Djaballah & Michael Chase (eds.) (2011). The Present Alone is Our Happiness, Second Edition: Conversations with Jeannie Carlier and Arnold I. Davidson. Stanford University Press.
    One of the most influential historians of ancient philosophy of the past half-century, Pierre Hadot was adept at using ancient philosophers to illuminate the relevance of their ideas to contemporary life. This new edition of _The Present Alone is Our Happiness_, which has been significantly revised and expanded to include two previously untranslated essays, is an ideal introduction to some of Hadot's more scholarly work. In it, we discover that to be an Epicurean is not merely to think like one; (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Marc Djaballah (ed.) (2008). The Present Alone is Our Happiness: Conversations with Jeannie Carlier and Arnold I. Davidson. Stanford University Press.
    In this book of brilliantly erudite and precise discussions, Pierre Hadot explains that for the Ancients philosophy was not reducible to the building of a theoretical system: it was above all a choice about how to live one's life. One of the most influential historians of ancient philosophy in the world today, Hadot is adept at using ancient philosophers to illuminate the relevance of their ideas to contemporary life. In this book, which is an ideal introduction to Hadot's more scholarly (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  61
    Jeffery Yen (2010). Authorizing Happiness: Rhetorical Demarcation of Science and Society in Historical Narratives of Positive Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 30 (2):67.
    Notwithstanding the numerous critiques that have been leveled at the field of positive psychology over its short history, the field and its practitioners continue to enjoy substantial growth and popularity. Although several factors have no doubt contributed to their advancement, work in the field of science studies suggests that rhetorical demarcation in scientific writing, by which scientific fields establish their domains and distinguish themselves from other forms of intellectual activity, may be equally significant. Such “boundary work” is an important (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  12
    Pierre Hadot (2009). The Present Alone is Our Happiness: Conversations with Jeannie Carlier and Arnold I. Davidson. Stanford University Press.
    Tied to the apron strings of the church -- Researcher, teacher, philosopher -- Philosophical discourse -- Interpretation, objectivity and nonsense -- Unitary experience and philosophical life -- Philosophical discourse as spiritual exercise -- Philosophy as life and as a quest for wisdom -- From Socrates to Foucault : a long tradition -- Inacceptable? -- The present alone is our happiness.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  42.  32
    Daniel M. Haybron (2013). The Proper Pursuit of Happiness. Res Philosophica 90 (3):387-411.
    What are the norms governing the pursuit of happiness? Presumably not just anything goes. But are the rules any more interesting than platitudes like “do whatworks, as long as you don’t hurt anyone”? Such questions have become especially salient in light of the development of positive psychology. Yet so far these matters have received relatively little attention, most of it from skeptics who doubt that the pursuit of happiness is an important, or even legitimate, enterprise. This paper examines (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Pierre Hadot (2011). The Present Alone is Our Happiness: Conversations with Jeannie Carlier and Arnold I. Stanford University Press.
    Tied to the apron strings of the church -- Researcher, teacher, philosopher -- Philosophical discourse -- Interpretation, objectivity and nonsense -- Unitary experience and philosophical life -- Philosophical discourse as spiritual exercise -- Philosophy as life and as a quest for wisdom -- From Socrates to Foucault : a long tradition -- Inacceptable? -- The present alone is our happiness.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Rachana Kamtekar (2001). Social Justice and Happiness in the Republic: Plato's Two Principles. History of Political Thought 22 (2):189-220.
    rally best suited’. One would ordinarily suppose social justice to concern not only the allocation of duties but also the distribution of benefits. I argue that this expectation is fulfilled not by Plato’s conception of social justice, but by the normative basis for it, Plato’s requirement of aiming at the happiness of all the citizens. I argue that Plato treats social justice as a necessary but not sufficient means to happiness that guarantees only the production of the greatest (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  9
    Don Adams (1991). Aquinas on Aristotle on Happiness. Medieval Philosophy & Theology 1:98-118.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  12
    Carl Elliott (2007). Against Happiness. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):167-171.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47.  14
    Frans Svensson (2014). Non-Eudaimonism, The Sufficiency of Virtue for Happiness, and Two Senses of the Highest Good in Descartes's Ethics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):277-296.
    In his reflections on ethics, Descartes distances himself from the eudaimonistic tradition in moral philosophy by introducing a distinction between happiness and the highest good. While happiness, in Descartes’s view, consists in an inner state of complete harmony and satisfaction, the highest good instead consists in virtue, i.e. in ‘a firm and constant resolution' to always use our free will well or correctly. In Section 1 of this paper, I pursue the Cartesian distinction between happiness and the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  6
    Peilei Chen (2010). A Cognitive Study of “Happiness” Metaphors in English and Chinese Idioms. Asian Culture and History 2 (2):P172.
    Happiness is one of the basic human emotions. This paper takes the metaphorical expressions of “happiness” in English and Chinese idioms as the objects of research. The effort is made to find the differences and similarities between English and Chinese metaphorical systems of emotional concepts and the causes of these differences and similarities so as to help people further understand the nature of emotional metaphors.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  8
    Antis Loizides (2014). Mill on Happiness: A Question of Method. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):302-321.
    It seems that eudaimonistic reconstructions of John Stuart Mill's conception of happiness have fallen prey to what they thought Mill should have done with regard to the role of pleasure in his notion of happiness. Insisting that utility and eudaimonia make conflicting claims, something which mirrors Mill's ‘conflicting loyalties’, they downgrade pleasure to just one of the ingredients of happiness. However, a closer look at Mill's intellectual development suggests otherwise. By focusing on Mill's radical background, this paper (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  8
    Peter Triantafillou & Afonso Moreira (2005). Modern Templates of Happiness: Performing Spiritualism and Psychotechnics in Denmark. History of the Human Sciences 18 (2):87-109.
    Inspired by Michel Foucault’s notion of subjugated knowledge, this paper elaborates an analytical framework seeking to unsettle the authority of contemporary psychology. This framework focuses on the performative dimension of psychology and other ‘psy-regimes’, namely the practices and actions that may be undertaken on the basis of these forms of knowledge. We probe this framework by exploring the emergence, utilization and demise of spiritualism and psychotechnics in Denmark. On the basis of this framework, we argue that the rise and fall (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000