Search results for 'Happiness History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rosslyn Ives (2013). Murphy's Law and the Pursuit of Happiness: A History of the Civil Celebrant Movement [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 112:23.score: 96.0
    Ives, Rosslyn Review(s) of: Murphy's law and the pursuit of happiness: A history of the civil celebrant movement, by Dally Messenger III, Spectrum Publications, Melbourne 2012. $35 p and p.
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  2. Ziyad Marar (2005). Elusive Pursuits: A Brief History of Happiness. Think 3 (9):101-109.score: 96.0
    Ziyad Marar presents a brief history of the quest for happiness, and of its relation to philosophy.
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  3. Stephen A. White (1992). Sovereign Virtue: Aristotle on the Relation Between Happiness and Prosperity. Stanford University Press.score: 84.0
    The central subject of Aristotle's ethics is happiness or living well. Most people in his day (as in ours), eager to enjoy life, impressed by worldly success, and fearful of serious loss, believed that happiness depends mainly on fortune in achieving prosperity and avoiding adversity. Aristotle, however, argues that virtuous conduct is the governing factor in living well and attaining happiness. While admitting that neither the blessings not the afflictions of fortune are unimportant, he maintains that the (...)
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  4. Vivasvan Soni (2011). Mourning Happiness: Narrative and the Politics of Modernity. Cornell University Press.score: 84.0
    Solon's cryptic injunction : "Call no man happy until dead" -- A mourning happiness : the Athenian funeral oration -- Difficult happiness : the case of tragedy -- Aristotle's hermeneutic of happiness : the first forgetting -- The trial narrative in Richardson's Pamela : suspending the hermeneutic of happiness -- Effects of the trial narrative on the concept of happiness -- Marriage plot -- The tragedies of sentimentalism -- Kantian ethics and the discourses of modernity (...)
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  5. Alan O. Ebenstein (1991). The Greatest Happiness Principle: An Examination of Utilitarianism. Garland.score: 78.0
     
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  6. Darrin M. McMahon (2009). The History of Happiness and the Contemporary Happiness Studies.". In Amitava Krishna Dutt & Benjamin Radcliff (eds.), Happiness, Economics and Politics: Towards a Multi-Disciplinary Approach. Edward Elgar. 25--32.score: 78.0
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  7. Timothy A. Mitchell (1983). Hedonism and Eudemonism in Aquinas--Not the Same as Happiness. Franciscan Herald Press.score: 78.0
  8. Daniel M. Haybron (2012). Review: Nicholas White,A Brief History of Happiness. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (3):729-732.score: 72.0
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  9. Bart Schultz (2007). Nicholas White, A Brief History of Happiness:A Brief History of Happiness. Ethics 117 (3):588-590.score: 72.0
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  10. Robert Barron (2007). A Brief History of Happiness. Review of Metaphysics 61 (1):167-169.score: 72.0
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  11. N. Hinske (1978). Between Fortuna and Felicitas-Changing Notions of Happiness Throughout History. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 85 (2):317-330.score: 72.0
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  12. Vivaldi Jean-Marie (2008). Kierkegaard: History and Eternal Happiness. University Press of America.score: 72.0
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  13. Nicholas White (2006). A Brief History of Happiness. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 72.0
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  14. Anthony Kenny (1992). Aristotle on the Perfect Life. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Aristotle's teaching on the subject of happiness has been a topic of intense philosophical debate in recent years; it is of vital importance to the question of the relevance of his ethics in the present day. Aristotle's admirers struggle to read a comprehensive account of the supreme happiness into the Nicomachean Ethics; Kenny argues that those who are prepared to take the neglected Eudemian Ethics seriously preserve their admiration intact without doing violence to any of the relevant texts (...)
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  15. Wolfgang Rother (2005). La Maggiore Felicità Possibile: Untersuchungen Zur Philosophie der Aufklärung in Nord- Und Mittelitalien. Schwabe.score: 60.0
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  16. Maria Bettetini & Francesco D. Paparella (eds.) (2005). Le Felicità Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S.I.S.P.M.) Milano, 12-13 Settembre 2003. [REVIEW] Brepols.score: 60.0
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  17. Maria Bettetini & Francesco D. Paparella (eds.) (2005). Le Felicità Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S. Brepols.score: 60.0
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  18. Beverley C. Southgate (2005). What is History For? Routledge.score: 54.0
    What is History For? is a timely publication that examines the purpose and point of historical studies. Recent debates on the role of the humanities and the ongoing impact of poststructuralist thought on the very nature of historical enquiry, have rendered the question "what is history for?" of utmost importance. Charting the development of historical studies, Beverley Southgate examines the various uses to which history has been put. While history has often supposedly been studied "for its (...)
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  19. Fred Feldman, Happiness: Empirical Research; Philosophical Conclusions.score: 42.0
    In recent years there has been a tremendous surge of academic interest in happiness. It seems that just about every week there is an announcement of a new book on the nature of happiness, or the measurement of happiness2, or the causes of happiness, or the history of happiness3. Some of these books have been written by philosophers. Others have been written by psychologists, economists, sociologists, and other empirical scientists.4 The surge of interest in happiness (...)
     
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  20. Jonathan Phillips, Sven Nyholm & Shen-yi Liao (forthcoming). The Good in Happiness. In Joshua Knobe, Tania Lombrozo & Shaun Nichols (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy, Volume 1. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    There has been a long history of arguments over whether happiness is anything more than a particular set of psychological states. On one side, some philosophers have argued that there is not, endorsing a descriptive view of happiness. Affective scientists have also embraced this view and are reaching a near consensus on a definition of happiness as some combination of affect and life-satisfaction. On the other side, some philosophers have maintained an evaluative view of happiness, (...)
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  21. Raymond J. Devettere (1993). Clinical Ethics and Happiness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (1):71-89.score: 42.0
    Most contemporary accounts of clinical ethics do not explain why clinicians should be ethical. Those few that do attempt an explanation usually claim that clinicians should be ethical because ethical behavior provides an important good for the patient – better care. Both these approaches ignore the customary traditional reason for being ethical, namely, the good of the moral agent. This good was commonly called ‘happiness’. The following article shows how the personal happiness of the moral agent provided a (...)
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  22. Loyal D. Rue (1994). By the Grace of Guile: The Role of Deception in Natural History and Human Affairs. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    The nihilists are right, admits philosopher Loyal Rue. The universe is blind and aimless, indifferent to us and void of meaning. There are no absolute truths and no objective values. There is no right or wrong way to live, only alternative ways. There is no correct reading of a text or a picture or a dance. God is dead, nihilism reigns. But, Rue adds, nihilism is a truth inconsistent with personal happiness and social coherence. What we need instead is (...)
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  23. David Forman (forthcoming). Kant’s Moderate Cynicism and the Harmony Between Virtue and Worldly Happiness. Journal of the History of Philosophy.score: 42.0
    For Kant, any authentic moral demands are wholly distinct from the demands of prudence. This has led critics to complain that Kantian moral demands are incompatible with our human nature as happiness-seekers. Kant’s defenders have pointed out, correctly, that Kant can and does assert that it is permissible, at least in principle, to pursue our own happiness. But this response does not eliminate the worry that a life organized around the pursuit of virtue might turn out to be (...)
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  24. Darren Oldridge (2005). Strange Histories: The Trial of the Pig, the Walking Dead, and Other Matters of Fact From the Medieval and Renaissance Worlds. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Did you know that insects could be tried for criminal acts in pre-industrial Europe, that the dead could be executed, that statues could be subjected to public humiliation, or that it was widely accepted that corpses could return to life? What made reasonable, educated men and women behave in ways that seem utterly nonsensical to us today? Strange Histories presents for the first time a serious account of some of the most extraordinary occurrences of European history. Throughout the ages, (...)
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  25. Anna Wierzbicka (2010). The “History of Emotions” and the Future of Emotion Research. Emotion Review 2 (3):269-273.score: 42.0
    This article focuses on the emergence of a new subfield of emotion research known as “history of emotions.” People’s emotional lives depend on the construals which they impose on events, situations, and human actions. Different cultures and different languages suggest different habitual construals, and since habitual construals change over time, as a result, habitual feelings change, too. But to study construals we need a suitable methodology. The article assumes that such a methodology is provided by the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (...)
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  26. Paul Guyer (2000). Kant on Freedom, Law, and Happiness. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Kant is often portrayed as the author of a rigid system of ethics in which adherence to a formal and universal principle of morality - the famous categorical imperative - is an end itself, and any concern for human goals and happiness a strictly secondary and subordinate matter. Such a theory seems to suit perfectly rational beings but not human beings. The twelve essays in this collection by one of the world's preeminent Kant scholars argue for a radically different (...)
     
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  27. Nicholas P. White (2002). Individual and Conflict in Greek Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    White opposes the long-standing view that ancient Greek ethics is fundamentally different from modern ethical views. He examines the ways in which Greek ethics has been interpreted since the 18th century, and traces the history in Greek ethical thought of the idea of conflict among human aims, in particular the conflict between conformity to ethical standards and one's own happiness.
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  28. Andrea Wilson Nightingale & D. N. Sedley (eds.) (2010). Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge Andrea Wilson Nightingale; 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe; 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus Kathryn A. Morgan; 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue David Sedley; 5. Divine contemplating mind Allan Silverman; 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism Alan Code; 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents Stephen White; 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in (...)
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  29. John R. Bowlin (1999). Contingency and Fortune in Aquinas's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    In this study John Bowlin argues that Aquinas's moral theology receives much of its character and content from an assumption about our common lot: the good we desire is difficult to know and to will, in particular because of contingencies of various kinds - within ourselves, in the ends and objects we pursue, and in the circumstances of choice. Since contingencies are fortune's effects, Aquinas insists that it is fortune that makes good choice difficult. Bowlin then explicates Aquinas's treatment of (...)
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  30. Neven Leddy & Avi Lifschitz (eds.) (2009). Epicurus in the Enlightenment. Voltaire Foundation.score: 36.0
    Eighteenth-century Epicureanism is often viewed as radical, anti-religious, and politically dangerous. But to what extent does this simplify the ancient philosophy and underestimate its significance to the Enlightenment? Through a pan-European analysis of Enlightenment centres from Scotland to Russia via the Netherlands, France and Germany, contributors argue that elements of classical Epicureanism were appropriated by radical and conservative writers alike. They move beyond literature and political theory to examine the application of Epicurean ideas in domains as diverse as physics, natural (...)
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  31. Ted Honderich (ed.) (1995/1999). The Philosophers: Introducing Great Western Thinkers. Oxford Univeristy Press.score: 36.0
    What better introduction to the world of philosophy than through the lives of its most prominent citizens. In The Philosophers, we are introduced to twenty-eight of the greatest thinkers in Western civilization, ranging from Aristotle and Plato to Wittgenstein, Heidegger, and Sartre. An illustrious team of scholars takes us on a concise and illuminating tour of some of the most brilliant minds and enduring ideas in history. Here is Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics, Plato's cave of shadows, Schopenhauer's vision of reality (...)
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  32. Jessica Rosenfeld (2010). Ethics and Enjoyment in Late Medieval Poetry: Love After Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: love after Aristotle; 1. Enjoyment: a medieval history; 2. Narcissus after Aristotle: love and ethics in Le Roman de la Rose; 3. Metamorphoses of pleasure in the fourteenth century Dit Amoureux; 4. Love's knowledge: fabliau, allegory, and fourteenth-century anti-intellectualism; 5. On human happiness: Dante, Chaucer, and the felicity of friendship; Coda: Chaucer's philosophical women.
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  33. Pierre Hadot (2009). The Present Alone is Our Happiness: Conversations with Jeannie Carlier and Arnold I. Davidson. Stanford University Press.score: 36.0
    Tied to the apron strings of the church -- Researcher, teacher, philosopher -- Philosophical discourse -- Interpretation, objectivity and nonsense -- Unitary experience and philosophical life -- Philosophical discourse as spiritual exercise -- Philosophy as life and as a quest for wisdom -- From Socrates to Foucault : a long tradition -- Inacceptable? -- The present alone is our happiness.
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  34. Pierre Hadot (2011). The Present Alone is Our Happiness: Conversations with Jeannie Carlier and Arnold I. Stanford University Press.score: 36.0
    Tied to the apron strings of the church -- Researcher, teacher, philosopher -- Philosophical discourse -- Interpretation, objectivity and nonsense -- Unitary experience and philosophical life -- Philosophical discourse as spiritual exercise -- Philosophy as life and as a quest for wisdom -- From Socrates to Foucault : a long tradition -- Inacceptable? -- The present alone is our happiness.
     
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  35. Karl Jaspers (1966). The Great Philosophers. London, Hart-Davis.score: 36.0
    Karl Jaspers died in 1969, leaving unfinished his universal history of philosophy, a history organized around those philosophers who have influenced the course of human thought. The first two volumes of this work appeared in Jasper's lifetime the third and fourth have been gathered from the vast material of his posthumous papers. This is the fourth volume. Following his original plan of "promoting the happiness that comes of meeting great men and sharing in their thoughts," Jaspers discusses (...)
     
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  36. Daniel N. Robinson (2004). The Great Ideas of Philosophy. Teaching Co..score: 36.0
    From the Upanishads to Homer -- Philosophy, did the Greeks invent it -- Pythagoras and the divinity of number -- What is there? -- The Greek tragedians on man's fate -- Herodotus and the lamp of history -- Socrates on the examined life -- Plato's search for truth -- Can virtue be taught? -- Plato's Republic, man writ large -- Hippocrates and the science of life -- Aristotle on the knowable -- Aristotle on friendship -- Aristotle on the perfect (...)
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  37. Rachana Kamtekar (2001). Social Justice and Happiness in the Republic: Plato's Two Principles. History of Political Thought 22 (2):189-220.score: 30.0
    rally best suited’. One would ordinarily suppose social justice to concern not only the allocation of duties but also the distribution of benefits. I argue that this expectation is fulfilled not by Plato’s conception of social justice, but by the normative basis for it, Plato’s requirement of aiming at the happiness of all the citizens. I argue that Plato treats social justice as a necessary but not sufficient means to happiness that guarantees only the production of the greatest (...)
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  38. Paul Ricœur (2004). Memory, History, Forgetting. University of Chicago Press.score: 30.0
    Why do major historical events such as the Holocaust occupy the forefront of the collective consciousness, while profound moments such as the Armenian genocide, the McCarthy era, and France's role in North Africa stand distantly behind? Is it possible that history "overly remembers" some events at the expense of others? A landmark work in philosophy, Paul Ricoeur's Memory, History, Forgetting examines this reciprocal relationship between remembering and forgetting, showing how it affects both the perception of historical experience and (...)
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  39. John Lemos (1997). Virtue, Happiness, and Intelligibility. Journal of Philosophical Research 22:307-320.score: 30.0
    In such works as A Short History of Ethics, Against the Self-lmages of the Age, and After Virtue, Alasdair MacIntyre has argued that the intelligibility of the moral life hinges upon viewing the moral life as essential to the happy life, or eudaimonia. In my article I examine the reasons he gives for saying this, arguing that this thesis is not sufficiently defended by MacIntyre. I also draw connections between this thesis about the intelligibility of the moral life and (...)
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  40. Luigino Bruni (2007). Civil Economy: Efficiency, Equity, Public Happiness. Peter Lang.score: 30.0
    The practical consequence of such a methodological stance is that it forces the scholar of NPOs who is unsympathetic to the homo oeconomicus model to work ...
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  41. Caleb Thompson (2009). Quietism From the Side of Happiness Tolstoy, Schopenhauer, War and Peace. Common Knowledge 15 (3):395-411.score: 30.0
    Tolstoy writes in a letter to his friend A. A. Fet that what he has written in War and Peace, “especially in the epilogue,” is also said by Schopenhauer in The World as Will and Representation. Tolstoy adds, however, that Schopenhauer approaches “it from the other side.” Schopenhauer does indeed say much the same thing as Tolstoy says in his epilogue and elsewhere about history and the will. Each of these authors argues that history is not progressing and (...)
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  42. Peilei Chen (2010). A Cognitive Study of “Happiness” Metaphors in English and Chinese Idioms. Asian Culture and History 2 (2):P172.score: 30.0
    Happiness is one of the basic human emotions. This paper takes the metaphorical expressions of “happiness” in English and Chinese idioms as the objects of research. The effort is made to find the differences and similarities between English and Chinese metaphorical systems of emotional concepts and the causes of these differences and similarities so as to help people further understand the nature of emotional metaphors.
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  43. M. E. (2003). Henry Dale, Histamine and Anaphylaxis: Reflections on the Role of Chance in the History of Allergy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (3):455-472.score: 26.0
    The role of the Nobel Laureate Henry Dale (1875-1968) in the history of allergy and the association of anaphylactic conditions with the liberation of histamine is often overlooked. This paper examines his work in this field in the broader context of his researches into endogenous mediators of normal physiological and abnormal pathological functioning. It also assesses the impact of his working environment, especially the unique conditions he enjoyed at the beginning of the twentieth century in the Wellcome Physiological Research (...)
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  44. John Stuart Mill (2009). Utilitarianism. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The Oxford Philosophical Texts series consists of authoritative teaching editions of canonical texts in the history of philosophy from the ancient world down to modern times. Each volume provides a clear, well laid out text together with a comprehensive introduction by a leading specialist, providing the student with detailed critical guidance on the intellectual context of the work and the structure and philosophical importance of the main arguments. Endnotes are supplied which provide further commentary on the arguments and explain (...)
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  45. Robert Bass (2012). Lives in the Balance: Utilitarianism and Animal Research. In Jeremy Garrett (ed.), The Ethics of Animal Research: Exploring the Controversy. MIT Press.score: 24.0
    In the long history of moral theory, non-human animals—hereafter, just animals—have often been neglected entirely or have been relegated to some secondary status. Since its emergence in the early 19th century, utilitarianism has made a difference in that respect by focusing upon happiness or well-being (and their contraries) rather than upon the beings who suffer or enjoy. Inevitably, that has meant that human relations to and use of other animals have appeared in a different light. Some cases have (...)
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  46. Shoshana Brassfield (2012). Never Let the Passions Be Your Guide: Descartes and the Role of the Passions. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (3):459-477.score: 24.0
    Commentators commonly assume that Descartes regards it as a function of the passions to inform us or teach us which things are beneficial and which are harmful. As a result, they tend to infer that Descartes regards the passions as an appropriate guide to what is beneficial or harmful. In this paper I argue that this conception of the role of the passions in Descartes is mistaken. First, in spite of a number of texts appearing to show the contrary, I (...)
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  47. Luce Irigaray (1996). I Love to You: Sketch for a Felicity Within History. Routledge.score: 24.0
    In I Love to You , Luce Irigaray moves from the critique of patriarchy to an exploration of the ground for a possible inter-subjectivity between the two sexes. Continuing her rejection of demands for equality, Irigaray poses the question: how can we move to a new era of sexual difference in which women and men establish lasting relations with one another without reducing the other to the status of object? Drawing upon Hegel, Irigaray proposes a dialectic appropriate to each sex (...)
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  48. Erik Angner & Valerie Tiberius, Commentary.score: 24.0
    In the history of Western philosophy, questions of well-being and happiness have played a central role for some 2,500 years. Yet, when it comes to the systematic empirical study of happiness and satisfaction, philosophers are relative latecomers. Empirically-minded psychologists began studying systematically the determinants and distribution of happiness and satisfaction – understood as positive or desirable subjectively experienced mental states – during the 1920’s and 30’s, as personality psychology emerged as a bona fide subdiscipline of psychology (...)
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  49. Amnon Goldworth (1969). The Meaning of Bentham's Greatest Happiness Principle. Journal of the History of Philosophy 7 (3):315-321.score: 24.0
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  50. Immanuel Kant (1909/2004). Critique of Practical Reason. Dover Publications.score: 24.0
    The second of Kant’s three critiques, Critique of Practical Reason forms the center of Kantian philosophy. Kant establishes his role as a vindicator of the truth of Christianity in this work, published in 1788, and he approaches his proof by presenting positive affirmations of the immortality of the soul and the existence of God. The philosopher offers an argument concerning the summum bonum of life: people should not simply search after happiness, but follow the moral law and seek to (...)
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