Search results for 'Harlan Grant Cohen' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ariel Cohen & Manfred Krifka (2014). Superlative Quantifiers and Meta-Speech Acts. Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (1):41-90.score: 240.0
    Recent research has shown that the superlative quantifiers at least and at most do not have the same type of truth conditions as the comparative quantifiers more than (Geurts and Nouwen, Language 83:533–559, 2007) and fewer than. We propose that superlative quantifiers are interpreted at the level of speech acts. We relate them to denegations of speech acts, as in I don’t promise to come, which we analyze as excluding the speech act of a promise to come. Calling such conversational (...)
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  2. George Parkin Grant (1995). George Grant in Conversation. Anansi.score: 150.0
    "Historian Ramsay Cook called George Grant one of Canadas two most important political thinkers in the twentieth century.
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  3. Ted Cohen (2000). A Correction by Ted Cohen. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):303.score: 120.0
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  4. Howard Cohen (1978). On the Exchange Between Schrag and Cohen, "the Child's Status in the Democratic State". Political Theory 6 (2):249-251.score: 120.0
  5. G. A. Cohen & Simon Kennedy (2005). GA Cohen and the End of Traditional Historical Materialism. Historical Materialism 13 (4):331-344.score: 120.0
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  6. L. Jonathan Cohen (1956). American Thought: A Critical Sketch. By M. R. Cohen (Edited by F. S. Cohen). (The Free Press, Glencoe, Illinois. 1954.Pp. 360. Price $5.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 31 (117):166-.score: 120.0
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  7. Joshua Cohen (2001). Money, Politics, Political Equality Joshua Cohen. In Alex Byrne, Robert Stalnaker & Ralph Wedgwood (eds.), Fact and Value. Mit Press. 47.score: 120.0
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  8. Jeffrey M. Cohen (1971). Marion D. Cohen. In Charles Goethe Kuper & Asher Peres (eds.), Relativity and Gravitation. New York,Gordon and Breach Science Publishers. 99.score: 120.0
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  9. C. B. Cohen, S. E. Wheeler & D. A. Scott (2000). Prayer is Therapy-Cynthia B. Cohen, Sondra E. Wheeler, and David A. Scott Reply. Hastings Center Report 30 (6):5-5.score: 120.0
     
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  10. Hermann Cohen (1971). Reason and Hope: Selections From the Jewish Writings of Hermann Cohen. Norton.score: 120.0
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  11. J. D. Cohen & E. E. Smith (1997). Response From Cohen and Smith. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):126-127.score: 120.0
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  12. Morris Raphael Cohen (1970). The Faith of a Liberal. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 90.0
  13. G. Stuart Adam, Stephanie Craft & Elliot D. Cohen (2004). Three Essays on Journalism and Virtue. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):247 – 275.score: 40.0
    In these essays, we are concerned with virtue in journalism and the media but are mindful of the tension between the commercial foundations of publishing and broadcasting, on the one hand, and journalism's democratic obligations on the other. Adam outlines, first, a moral vision of journalism focusing on individualistic concepts of authorship and craft. Next, Craft attempts to bridge individual and organizational concerns by examining the obligations of organizations to the individuals working within them. Finally, Cohen discusses the importance (...)
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  14. G. A. Cohen (1983). More on Exploitation and the Labour Theory of Value. Inquiry 26 (3):309 – 331.score: 40.0
    In ?The Labour Theory of Value and the Concept of Exploitation? I distinguished between two ways in which the labour theory of value is formulated, both of which are common. In the popular formulation, the amount of value a commodity has depends on how much labour was spent producing it. In the strict formulation, which is so called because it formulates the labour theory of value proper, the amount of value a commodity has depends on nothing about its history but (...)
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  15. Jonathan Cohen (2010). It's Not Easy Being Green : Hardin and Color Relationalism. In Jonathan Cohen & Mohan Matthen (eds.), Color Ontology and Color Science. Mit Press.score: 40.0
    But Hardin hasn’t contented himself with reframing traditional philosoph- ical issues about color in a way that is sensitive to relevant empirical con- straints. In addition, he has been a staunch defender of color eliminativism — the view that there are no colors, qua properties of tables, chairs, and other mind-external objects, and a vociferous critic of several varieties of re- alism about color that have been defended by others (e.g., [Hardin, 2003], [Hardin, 2005]). These other views include the so-called (...)
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  16. Jonathan Cohen (2010). Color Relationalism and Color Phenomenology. In Bence Nanay (ed.), Perceiving the World. Oxford University Press. 13.score: 40.0
    Color relationalism is the view that colors are constituted in terms of relations between subjects and objects. The most historically important form of color relationalism is the classic dispositionalist view according to which, for example red is the disposition to look red to standard observers in standard conditions (mutatis mutandis for other colors).1 However, it has become increasingly apparent in recent years that a commitment to the relationality of colors bears interest that goes beyond dispositionalism (Cohen, 2004; Matthen, 1999, (...)
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  17. Judith Grant (1993). Fundamental Feminism: Contesting the Core Concepts of Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 40.0
    What makes feminist theory feminist? How did so many different feminisms come to exist? In Fundamental Feminism, Judith Grant addresses these questions by offering a critical exploration of the evolution of feminist theory and the state of feminist thinking today. Grant provides a lively assessment of the major problems of contemporary feminist thought and identifies a set of common assumptions that link the wide variety of feminist theories in existence. Fundamental Feminism calls for nothing less than a substantial (...)
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  18. Jonathan Cohen (2010). Sounds and Temporality. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 5:303-320.score: 40.0
    What is the relationship between sounds and time? More specifically, is there something essentially or distinctively temporal about sounds that distinguishes them from, say, colors, shapes, odors, tastes, or other sensible qualities? And just what might this distinctive relation to time consist in? Apart from their independent interest, these issues have a number of important philosophical repercussions. First, if sounds are temporal in a way that other sensible qualities are not, then this would mean that standard lists of paradigm secondary (...)
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  19. Edward Grant (1981). Much Ado About Nothing: Theories of Space and Vacuum From the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    The primary objective of this study is to provide a description of the major ideas about void space within and beyond the world that were formulated between the fourteenth and early eighteenth centuries. The second part of the book - on infinite, extracosmic void space - is of special significance. The significance of Professor Grant's account is twofold: it provides the first comprehensive and detailed description of the scholastic Aristotelian arguments for and against the existence of void space; and (...)
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  20. Ruth Weissbourd Grant (1997). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.score: 40.0
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. Hypocrisy and Integrity offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative. . . . Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and (...)
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  21. Peter J. Cohen (2007). Addiction, Molecules and Morality: Disease Does Not Obviate Responsibility. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):21 – 23.score: 40.0
    The author comments on the article “The neurobiology of addiction: Implications for voluntary control of behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. The author agrees with Hyman that debate persists whether addiction is a brain disease or a moral condition. The author states that Hyman has not fully answered the question of when addicted persons are responsible for what they do. The author also suggests that addiction is a brain disease and therapy can improve the symptoms of this life-threatening syndrome. Accession Number: (...)
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  22. Richard A. Cohen (2001). Ethics, Exegesis, and Philosophy: Interpretation After Levinas. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    The reputation and influence of Emmanuel Levinas (1906-96) have grown powerfully in recent years. Well known in France in his lifetime, he has since his death become widely regarded as a major European moral philosopher profoundly shaped by his Jewish background. A pupil of Husserl and Heidegger, Levinas pioneered new forms of exegesis with his postmodern readings of the Talmud, and as an ethicist brought together religious and non-religious, Jewish and non-Jewish traditions of contemporary thought. Richard A. Cohen has (...)
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  23. Jonathan Cohen, Philosophy 103: Introduction to Philosophy.score: 40.0
    Instructor: Jonathan Cohen (joncohenREMOVETHIS@aardvark.ucsd.edu (omit text in caps, which reduces automated spam)) office: (732) 445 6163 home: (718) 499 1213 Office hours: Tuesday, 12:30 to 2:00, in Psychology A132 , on Busch Campus.
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  24. Elizabeth D. Almerm, Jeffrey R. Cohen & Louise E. Single (2004). Is It the Kids or the Schedule?: The Incremental Effect of Families and Flexible Scheduling on Perceived Career Success. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (1):51-65.score: 40.0
    Flexible work arrangements (FWAs) are widely offered in public accounting as a tool to retain valued professional staff. Previous research has shown that participants in FWAs are perceived to be less likely to succeed in their careers in public accounting than individuals in public accounting who do not participate in FWAs (Cohen and Single, 2001). Research has also documented an increasing backlash against family–friendly policies in the workplace as placing unfair burdens on individuals without children. Building directly on a (...)
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  25. M. J. Grant (2001). Serial Music, Serial Aesthetics: Compositional Theory in Post-War Europe. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    Serial music was one of the most important aesthetic movements to emerge in post-war Europe, but its uncompromising music and modernist aesthetic has often been misunderstood. This book focuses on the controversial journal die Reihe, whose major contributors included Stockhausen, Eimert, Pousseur, Dieter Schnebel and G. M. Koenig, and discusses it in connection with many lesser-known sources in German musicology. It traces serialism's debt to the theories of Klee and Mondrian, and its relationship to developments in concrete art, modern poetry (...)
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  26. Colin Grant (2001). Altruism and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    Separated from its anchorage in religion, ethics has followed the social sciences in seeing human beings as fundamentally characterized by self-interest, so that altruism is either naively idealistic or arrogantly self-sufficient. Colin Grant contends that, as a modern secular concept, altruism is a parody on the self-giving love of Christianity, so that its dismissal represents a social levelling that loses the depths that theology makes intelligible and religion makes possible. The Christian affirmation is that God is characterized (...)
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  27. Martin Cohen (2007). 101 Ethical Dilemmas. Routledge.score: 40.0
    From overcrowded lifeboats to the censor's pen, Martin Cohen's stimulating and amusing dilemmas will have you scratching your head and laughing out loud in equal measure.
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  28. Jack Cohen (1994). The Collapse of Chaos: Discovering Simplicity in a Complex World. Viking.score: 40.0
    Jack Cohen and Ian Stewart explore the ability of complicated rules to generate simple behaviour in nature through 'the collapse of chaos'.
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  29. George Parkin Grant (1974/1985). English-Speaking Justice. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 40.0
    George Grant's magnificent four-part meditation sums up much that is central to his own thought, including a critique of modern liberalism, an analysis of John Rawls's Theory of Justice, and insights into the larger Western philosophical ...
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  30. Tom Cohen (1994). Anti-Mimesis From Plato to Hitchcock. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    The material elements of writing have long been undervalued, and have been dismissed by recent historicising trends of criticism; but analysis of these elements - sound, signature, letters - can transform our understanding of literary texts. In this book Tom Cohen shows how, in an era of representational criticism and cultural studies, the role of close reading has been overlooked. Arguing that much recent criticism has been caught in potentially regressive models of representation, Professor Cohen undertakes to counter (...)
     
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  31. L. Jonathan Cohen (1989). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Induction and Probability. Oxford University Press.score: 40.0
    Two new philosophical problems surrounding the gradation of certainty began to emerge in the 17th century and are still very much alive today. One is concerned with the evaluation of inductive reasoning, whether in science, jurisprudence, or elsewhere; the other with the interpretation of the mathematical calculus of change. This book, aimed at non-specialists, investigates both problems and the extent to which they are connected. Cohen demonstrates the diversity of logical structures that are available for judgements of probability, and (...)
     
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  32. Jack Cohen (2000). Major Philosophers of Jewish Prayer in the Twentieth Century. Fordham University Press.score: 40.0
    Major Philosophers of Jewish Prayer in the Twentieth Century addresses the troubling questions posed by the modern Jewish worshiper, including such obstacles to prayer as the inability to concentrate on the words and meanings of formal liturgy, the paucity of emotional involvement, the lack of theological conviction, the anthropomorphic and particularly the masculine emphasis of prayer nomenclature, and other matters. In assessing these difficultites, Cohen brings to the reader the writings on prayer of some seminal 20th century Jewish theologians. (...)
     
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  33. L. Jonathan Cohen (1986). The Dialogue of Reason. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    Johnathan Cohen's book provides a lucid and penetrating treatment of the fundamental issues of contemporary analytical philosophy. This field now spans a greater variety of topics and divergence of opinion than fifty years ago, and Cohen's book addresses the presuppositions implicit to it and the patterns of reasoning on which it relies.
     
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  34. Randy Cohen (2002). The Good, the Bad & the Difference: How to Tell Right From Wrong in Everyday Situations. Doubleday.score: 40.0
    The man behind the New York Times Magazine ’s immensely popular column “The Ethicist”–syndicated in newspapers across the United States and Canada as “Everyday Ethics”–casts an eye on today’s manners and mores with a provocative, thematic collection of advice on how to be good in the real world. Every week in his column on ethics, Randy Cohen takes on conundrums presented in letters from perplexed people who want to do the right thing (or hope to get away with doing (...)
     
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  35. Sylvère Lotringer & Sande Cohen (eds.) (2001). French Theory in America. Routledge.score: 40.0
    What does it mean to"do theory" in America? In what ways has "French Theory" changed American intellectual and artistic life? How different is it from what French intellectuals themselves conceived, and what does all this tell us about American intellectual life? Is "French Theory" still a significant force in America, raising conceptual questions not easily answered? In this volume of new work--including the French writers Julia Kristeva, Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard, and Gilled Delezue, as well as essays by Sylvere Lotringer (...)
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  36. Aaron James, Deflating Fact-Insensitivity.score: 24.0
    This paper seeks to deflate G. A. Cohen’s recent meta-ethical argument that fundamental principles must be “fact-insensitive.” That argument does not advance Cohen’s dispute with Rawls and other social contract theorists. There is attenuated sense of “factinsensitivity” which they can happily grant, which Cohen never rules out on specifically metaethical grounds. While his barrage of substantive (non-meta-ethical) arguments may retain independent force, the argument from fact-insensitivity is largely (though not entirely) inconsequential.
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  37. Tom G. Palmer (1998). G. A. Cohen on Self‐Ownership, Property, and Equality. Critical Review 12 (3):225-251.score: 22.0
    Abstract G.A. Cohen has produced an influential criticism of libertarian?ism that posits joint ownership of everything in the world other than labor, with each joint owner having a veto right over any potential use of the world. According to Cohen, in that world rationality would require that wealth be divided equally, with no differential accorded to talent, ability, or effort. A closer examination shows that Cohen's argument rests on two central errors of reasoning and does not support (...)
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  38. Lydia Patton (2005). The Critical Philosophy Renewed: The Bridge Between Hermann Cohen's Early Work on Kant and Later Philosophy of Science. Angelaki 10 (1):109 – 118.score: 18.0
    German supporters of the Kantian philosophy in the late 19th century took one of two forks in the road: the fork leading to Baden, and the Southwest School of neo-Kantian philosophy, and the fork leading to Marburg, and the Marburg School, founded by Hermann Cohen. Between 1876, when Cohen came to Marburg, and 1918, the year of Cohen's death, Cohen, with his Marburg School, had a profound influence on German academia.
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  39. Aaron W. Hughes (2010). Maimonides and the Pre-Maimonidean Jewish Philosophical Tradition According to Hermann Cohen. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 18 (1):1-26.score: 18.0
    This paper examines Hermann Cohen's idiosyncratic construction of a medieval Jewish philosophical tradition, focusing primarily, though not exclusively, on his Charakteristik der Ethik Maimunis . This construction, not unlike modern accounts, is filtered through the central place of Maimonides. For Cohen, however, Maimonides' centrality is defined not by his systematization of Aristotelianism, but by his elevation of ethics over metaphysics. The ethical and pantheistic concerns of Maimonides' precursors, according to this reading, anticipate his uniqueness. Whereas Shlomo ibn Gabirol's (...)
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  40. Nicholas Vrousalis (2010). G. A. Cohen's Vision of Socialism. Journal of Ethics 14 (3-4):185-216.score: 18.0
    This essay is an attempt to piece together the elements of G. A. Cohen's thought on the theory of socialism during his long intellectual voyage from Marxism to political philosophy. It begins from his theory of the maldistribution of freedom under capitalism, moves onto his critique of libertarian property rights, to his diagnosis of the “deep inegalitarian” structure of John Rawls' theory and concludes with his rejection of the “cheap” fraternity promulgated by liberal egalitarianism. The paper's exegetical contention is (...)
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  41. A. Thomas (2011). Cohen's Critique of Rawls: A Double Counting Objection. Mind 120 (480):1099-1141.score: 18.0
    This paper assesses G. A. Cohen's critique of Rawlsian special incentives. Two arguments are identified and criticized: an argument that the difference principle does not justify incentives because of a limitation on an agent's prerogative to depart from a direct promotion of the interests of the worst off, and an argument that justice is limited in its scope. The first argument is evaluated and defended from the criticism that once Cohen has conceded some ethically grounded special incentives he (...)
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  42. Scott Edgar, Hermann Cohen's Principle of the Infinitesimal Method and its History: A Rationalist Interpretation.score: 18.0
    This paper defends a Leibnizian rationalist interpretation of Hermann Cohen’s Principle of the Infinitesimal Method and its History (1883). The first half of the paper identifies Cohen’s various different philosophical aims in the PIM. It argues that they are unified by the fact that Cohen’s arguments for addressing those aims all depend on a single shared premise. That linchpin premise is the claim that mathematical natural science can represent individual objects only if it also represents infinitesimal magnitudes. (...)
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  43. Robert Erlewine (2010). Hermann Cohen, Maimonides, and the Jewish Vvirtue of Humility. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 18 (1):27-47.score: 18.0
    This paper explores Hermann Cohen's engagement with, and appropriation of, Maimonides to refute the common assumption that Cohen's endeavor was to harmonize Judaism with Western culture. Exploring the changes of Cohen's conception of humility from Ethik des reinen Willens to the Ethics of Maimonides and Religion of Reason out of the Sources of Judaism , this paper highlights the centrality of the collective Jewish mission to bear witness against the dominant order of Western civilization and philosophy in (...)
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  44. Matthew Stanley (2008). Mysticism and Marxism: A.S. Eddington, Chapman Cohen, and Political Engagement Through Science Popularization. [REVIEW] Minerva 46 (2):181-194.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that that political context of British science popularization in the inter-war period was intimately tied to contemporary debates about religion and science. A leading science popularizer, the Quaker astronomer A.S. Eddington, and one of his opponents, the materialist Chapman Cohen, are examined in detail to show the intertwined nature of science, philosophy, religion, and politics.
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  45. Liisa Steinby (2011). Hermann Cohen and Bakhtin's Early Aesthetics. Studies in East European Thought 63 (3):227-249.score: 18.0
    In this article, Bakhtin’s early aesthetics is reread in the context of Hermann Cohen’s system of philosophy, especially his aesthetics. Bakhtin’s thinking from the early ethical writing Toward a Philosophy of Act to Author and Hero in Artistic Activity and Problems of Dostoevsky’s Poetics is followed. In Author and Hero , an individual is in his life conceived as involved in cognitive and ethical action but as remaining without a consummative form; the form, or the ‘soul’, is bestowed upon (...)
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  46. Jonathan Pugh, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2013). Cohen's Conservatism and Human Enhancement. Journal of Ethics 17 (4):331-354.score: 18.0
    In an intriguing essay, G. A. Cohen has defended a conservative bias in favour of existing value. In this paper, we consider whether Cohen’s conservatism raises a new challenge to the use of human enhancement technologies. We develop some of Cohen’s suggestive remarks into a new line of argument against human enhancement that, we believe, is in several ways superior to existing objections. However, we shall argue that on closer inspection, Cohen’s conservatism fails to offer grounds (...)
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  47. Ernst Cassirer & Lydia Patton (2005). Hermann Cohen and the Renewal of Kantian Philosophy. Angelaki 10 (1):95-108.score: 18.0
    The three works dedicated to securing the foundation of Kantian doctrine are linked inextricably to Hermann Cohen's philosophical life's work. For as much as Cohen distanced himself from Kant's conclusions on individual points in building his own system, the methodological consciousness that inspired all of Cohen's individual achievements certainly first achieved clarity and maturity in his scientific, comprehensive analysis of Kant's fundamental works.
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  48. Jacek Cichoń & Janusz Pawlikowski (1986). On Ideals of Subsets of the Plane and on Cohen Reals. Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (3):560-569.score: 18.0
    Let J be any proper ideal of subsets of the real line R which contains all finite subsets of R. We define an ideal J * ∣B as follows: X ∈ J * ∣B if there exists a Borel set $B \subset R \times R$ such that $X \subset B$ and for any x ∈ R we have $\{y \in R: \langle x,y\rangle \in B\} \in \mathscr{J}$ . We show that there exists a family $\mathscr{A} \subset \mathscr{J}^\ast\mid\mathscr{B}$ of power ω (...)
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  49. Kyle Johannsen (2013). Cohen on Rawls. Social Philosophy Today 29:135-149.score: 18.0
    G. A. Cohen is well known within contemporary political philosophy for claiming that the scope of principles of justice extends beyond the design of institutions to citizens’ personal choices. More recently, he’s also received attention for claiming that principles of justice are normatively ultimate, i.e., that they’re necessary for the justification of action guiding principles (regulatory rules) but are unsuitable to guide political practice themselves. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between these claims as they’re (...)
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  50. Myriam Bienenstock (2012). Hermann Cohen on the Concept of History: An Invention of Prophetism? Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (1):55-70.score: 18.0
    Abstract At the beginning of his best seller Meaning in History , Karl Löwith launches a violent attack against Jewish prophetism, using the philosophy of history of Hermann Cohen as his first and foremost example. This article purports to show that Löwith misinterpreted the thought of Hermann Cohen. It also reclaims Cohen's own position on history and on the philosophy of history by identifying the questions Cohen himself had asked in his time. At the end of (...)
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