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Profile: Gilbert Harman (Princeton University)
Profile: Graham Harman (American University in Cairo)
Profile: Amelia Harman
Profile: Brady Harman (Indiana University)
Profile: Mimi Harman (Cardiff University)
Profile: Robert Harman (Nottingham University)
  1. Gilbert Harman (1999). Moral Philosophy Meets Social Psychology: Virtue Ethics and the Fundamental Attribution Error. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (1999):315-331.
    Ordinary moral thought often commits what social psychologists call 'the fundamental attribution error '. This is the error of ignoring situational factors and overconfidently assuming that distinctive behaviour or patterns of behaviour are due to an agent's distinctive character traits. In fact, there is no evidence that people have character traits in the relevant sense. Since attribution of character traits leads to much evil, we should try to educate ourselves and others to stop doing it.
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  2. Gilbert Harman (1990). The Intrinsic Quality of Experience. Philosophical Perspectives 4:31-52.
  3. Gilbert Harman (1973). Thought. Princeton University Press.
  4. Gilbert Harman (1986). Change in View. MIT Press.
    Change in View offers an entirely original approach to the philosophical study of reasoning by identifying principles of reasoning with principles for revising one's beliefs and intentions and not with principles of logic. This crucial observation leads to a number of important and interesting consequences that impinge on psychology and artificial intelligence as well as on various branches of philosophy, from epistemology to ethics and action theory. Gilbert Harman is Professor of Philosophy at Princeton University. A Bradford Book.
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  5.  32
    Elizabeth Harman (2015). Transformative Experiences and Reliance on Moral Testimony. Res Philosophica 92 (2):323-339.
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  6. Graham Harman (2014). Stengers on Emergence. Biosocieties 9 (1):99-104.
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  7. Gilbert Harman (1977). The Nature of Morality: An Introduction to Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Contains an overall account of morality in its philosophical format particularly with regard to problems of observation, evidence, and truth.
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  8.  57
    Elizabeth Harman (2016). Morally Permissible Moral Mistakes. Ethics 126 (2):366-393.
    Does it ever happen that there are things we shouldn’t do and the reasons we shouldn’t do them are moral reasons, yet doing them is not morally wrong? Surprisingly, yes. I argue for a category that has not been recognized by moral theorists: morally permissible moral mistakes. Sometimes a supererogatory action is the thing a person should do; in failing to act, one makes a morally permissible moral mistake. Recognizing the category of morally permissible moral mistakes solves a puzzle about (...)
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  9. Gilbert H. Harman (1965). The Inference to the Best Explanation. Philosophical Review 74 (1):88-95.
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  10. Gilbert Harman (2000). The Nonexistence of Character Traits. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (2):223–226.
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  11. Gilbert Harman & Judith Jarvis Thomson (1996). Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity. Philosophy 71 (278):622-624.
     
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  12. Mark Greenberg & Gilbert Harman (2007). Conceptual Role Semantics. In Ernest LePore & Barry Smith (eds.), Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic. Oxford University Press 242-256.
    CRS says that the meanings of expressions of a language or other symbol system or the contents of mental states are determined and explained by the way symbols are used in thinking. According to CRS one.
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  13. Gilbert Harman (1975). Moral Relativism Defended. Philosophical Review 84 (1):3-22.
    Gilbert harman has recently proposed a version of moral relativism which is markedly clearer than any earlier statement of that position. Besides consistency and clarity, Harman claims for his thesis a number of positive virtues. The thesis, He argues, "helps explain otherwise puzzling aspects of our moral views"; it accounts for "a previously unnoticed distinction between inner and non-Inner judgments"' and it allows us to meet traditional objections to related theories. In this paper, I argue that none of these alleged (...)
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  14. Elizabeth Harman (2011). Does Moral Ignorance Exculpate? Ratio 24 (4):443-468.
    Non-moral ignorance can exculpate: if Anne spoons cyanide into Bill's coffee, but thinks she is spooning sugar, then Anne may be blameless for poisoning Bill. Gideon Rosen argues that moral ignorance can also exculpate: if one does not believe that one's action is wrong, and one has not mismanaged one's beliefs, then one is blameless for acting wrongly. On his view, many apparently blameworthy actions are blameless. I discuss several objections to Rosen. I then propose an alternative view on which (...)
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  15.  92
    Elizabeth Harman (2004). Can We Harm and Benefit in Creating? Philosophical Perspectives 18 (1):89–113.
    The non-identity problem concerns actions that affect who exists in the future. If such an action is performed, certain people will exist in the future who would not otherwise have existed: they are not identical to any of the people who would have existed if the action had not been performed. Some of these actions seem to be wrong, and they seem to be wrong in virtue of harming the very future individuals whose existence is dependent on their having been (...)
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  16.  73
    Gilbert Harman (2003). No Character or Personality. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (1):87-94.
    Solomon argues that, although recent research in social psychology has important implications for business ethics, it doesnot undermine an approach that stresses virtue ethics. However, he underestimates the empirical threat to virtue ethics, and his a prioriclaim that empirical research cannot overturn our ordinary moral psychology is overstated. His appeal to seemingly obvious differencesin character traits between people simply illustrates the fundamental attribution error. His suggestion that the Milgram and Darley andBatson experiments have to do with such character traits as (...)
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  17.  69
    Gilbert Harman (2000). Explaining Value and Other Essays in Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Explaining Value is a selection of the best of Gilbert Harman's shorter writings in moral philosophy. The thirteen essays are divided into four sections, which focus in turn on moral relativism, values and valuing, character traits and virtue ethics, and ways of explaining aspects of morality. Harman's distinctive approach to moral philosophy has provoked much interest; this volume offers a fascinating conspectus of his most important work in the area.
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  18.  67
    Gilbert Harman (1999). Reasoning, Meaning, and Mind. Oxford University Press.
    In this important new collection, Gilbert Harman presents a selection of fifteen interconnected essays on fundamental issues at the center of analytic philosophy. The book opens with a group of four essays discussing basic principles of reasoning and rationality. The next three essays argue against the once popular idea that certain claims are true and knowable by virtue of meaning. In the third group of essays Harman presents his own view of meaning and the possibility of thinking in language The (...)
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  19. Gilbert Harman (1996). Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity. Blackwell.
    Do moral questions have objective answers? In this great debate, Gilbert Harman explains and argues for relativism, emotivism, and moral scepticism.
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  20. Gilbert Harman (2009). Skepticism About Character Traits. Journal of Ethics 13 (2/3):235 - 242.
    The first part of this article discusses recent skepticism about character traits. The second describes various forms of virtue ethics as reactions to such skepticism. The philosopher J.-P. Sartre argued in the 1940s that character traits are pretenses, a view that the sociologist E. Goffman elaborated in the 1950s. Since then social psychologists have shown that attributions of character traits tend to be inaccurate through the ignoring of situational factors. (Personality psychology has tended to concentrate on people's conceptions of personality (...)
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  21.  23
    George A. Miller & Gilbert Harman (eds.) (1993). Conceptions of the Human Mind: Essays in Honor of George A. Miller. L. Erlbaum Associates.
    This volume is a direct result of a conference held at Princeton University to honor George A. Miller, an extraordinary psychologist. A distinguished panel of speakers from various disciplines -- psychology, philosophy, neuroscience and artificial intelligence -- were challenged to respond to Dr. Miller's query: "What has happened to cognition? In other words, what has the past 30 years contributed to our understanding of the mind? Do we really know anything that wasn't already clear to William James?" Each participant tried (...)
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  22.  4
    Gilbert Harman & Sanjeev Kulkarni (2007). Reliable Reasoning: Induction and Statistical Learning Theory. A Bradford Book.
    In _Reliable Reasoning_, Gilbert Harman and Sanjeev Kulkarni -- a philosopher and an engineer -- argue that philosophy and cognitive science can benefit from statistical learning theory, the theory that lies behind recent advances in machine learning. The philosophical problem of induction, for example, is in part about the reliability of inductive reasoning, where the reliability of a method is measured by its statistically expected percentage of errors -- a central topic in SLT. After discussing philosophical attempts to evade the (...)
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  23. Gilbert Harman (1998). Review: Précis of Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity: Precis of Part One. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (1):161 - 169.
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  24. Gilbert Harman, Moral Relativism.
    According to moral relativism, there is not a single true morality. There are a variety of possible moralities or moral frames of reference, and whether something is morally right or wrong, good or bad, just or unjust, etc. is a relative matter—relative to one or another morality or moral frame of reference. Something can be morally right relative to one moral frame of reference and morally wrong relative to another. It is useful to compare moral relativism to other relativisms. One (...)
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  25. Gilbert Harman (1986). Moral Explanations of Natural Facts-Can Moral Claims Be Tested Against Moral Reality? Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (S1):57-68.
  26. Gilbert Harman (2015). Moral Relativism is Moral Realism. Philosophical Studies 172 (4):855-863.
    I begin by describing my relation with Nicholas Sturgeon and his objections to things I have said about moral explanations. Then I turn to issues about moral relativism. One of these is whether a plausible version of moral relativism can be formulated as a claim about the logical form of certain moral judgments. I agree that is not a good way to think of moral relativism. Instead, I think of moral relativism as a version of moral realism. I compare moral (...)
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  27.  26
    Maria Merritt, John Doris & Gilbert Harman (2010). Character. In John Doris (ed.), The Moral Psychology Handbook. Oxford University Press
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  28.  34
    Graham Harman (2002). Tool-Being: Heidegger and the Metaphysics of Objects. Open Court.
    Martin Heidegger (1889–1976) influenced the work of such diverse thinkers as Sartre and Derrida. In Tool-Being, Graham Harman departs from the prevailing linguistic approach to analytic and continental philosophy in favor of Heideggerian object-oriented research into the secret contours of objects. Written in a colorful style, it will be of interest to anyone open to new trends in present-day philosophy.
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  29.  22
    Graham Harman (2005). Guerrilla Metaphysics: Phenomenology and the Carpentry of Things. Open Court.
    The current fashions in both analytic and continental philosophy are staunchly anti-metaphysical. There is supposedly no way to talk about the world itself — the philosopher is confined to antiseptic discussions of language, or of other modes of human access to the world. In this provocative work, Graham Harman expands the discussion from his previous book, Tool-Being, arguing for a theory of "the carpentry of things" — a more accessible way of viewing the world that incorporates ideas from Husserl, Levinas, (...)
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  30.  13
    Graham Harman (2016). Materialism is Not the Solution. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 24 (47).
    This article defends a new sense of “formalism” in philosophy and the arts, against recent materialist fashion. Form has three key opposite terms: matter, function, and content. First, I respond to Jane Bennett’s critique of object-oriented philosophy in favor of a unified matter-energy, showing that Bennett cannot reach the balanced standpoint she claims to obtain. Second, I show that the form/function dualism in architecture gives us two purely relational terms and thus cannot do justice to the topic of form. Third, (...)
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  31.  86
    Gilbert Harman & Brett Sherman (2004). Knowledge, Assumptions, Lotteries. Philosophical Issues 14 (1):492–500.
    John Hawthorne’s marvelous book contains a wealth of arguments and insights based on an impressive knowledge and understanding of contemporary discussion. We can address only a small aspect of the topic. In particular, we will offer our own answers to two questions about knowledge that he discusses.
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  32. Elizabeth Harman (2007). How is the Ethics of Stem Cell Research Different From the Ethics of Abortion? Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):207–225.
    It seems that if abortion is permissible, then stem cell research must be as well: it involves the death of a less significant thing (an embryo rather than a fetus) for a greater good (lives saved rather than nine months of physical imposition avoided). However, I argue in this essay that this natural thought is mistaken. In particular, on the assumption that embryos and fetuses have the full moral status of persons, abortion is permissible but one form of stem cell (...)
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  33. Gilbert Harman (1982). Conceptual Role Semantics. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 28 (April):242-56.
  34.  66
    Levi R. Bryant, Nick Srnicek & Graham Harman (2011). The Speculative Turn: Continental Materialism and Realism. Re.Press.
    Continental philosophy has entered a new period of ferment. The long deconstructionist era was followed with a period dominated by Deleuze, which has in turn evolved into a new situation still difficult to define. However, one common thread running through the new brand of continental positions is a renewed attention to materialist and realist options in philosophy. Among the leaders of the established generation, this new focus takes numerous forms. It might be hard to find many shared positions in the (...)
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  35.  29
    Graham Harman (2009). Prince of Networks: Bruno Latour and Metaphysics. Re.Press.
    Prince of Networks is the first treatment of Bruno Latour specifically as a philosopher. It has been eagerly awaited by readers of both Latour and Harman since their public discussion at the London School of Economics in February 2008. Part One covers four key works that display Latour’s underrated contributions to metaphysics: Irreductions, Science in Action, We Have Never Been Modern, and Pandora’s Hope. Harman contends that Latour is one of the central figures of contemporary philosophy, with a highly original (...)
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  36. Gilbert Harman (1982). Metaphysical Realism and Moral Relativism: Reflections on Hilary Putnam's Reason, Truth and History. Journal of Philosophy 79 (10):568-575.
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  37. Gilbert Harman (1997). Practical Reasoning. In Alfred R. Mele (ed.), Review of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press 431--63.
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  38. Elizabeth Harman (2003). The Potentiality Problem. Philosophical Studies 114 (1-2):173 - 198.
    Many people face a problem about potentiality: their moral beliefs appear to dictate inconsistent views about the significance of the potentiality to become a healthy adult. Briefly, the problem arises as follows. Consider the following two claims. First, both human babies and cats have moral status, but harms to babies matter more, morally, than similar harms to cats. Second, early human embryos lack moral status. It appears that the first claim can only be true if human babies have more moral (...)
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  39. Gilbert Harman (1987). (Nonsolipsistic) Conceptual Role Semantics. In Ernest LePore (ed.), Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic. Academic Press 242-256.
  40. Gilbert Harman & Sanjeev R. Kulkarni (2006). The Problem of Induction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):559-575.
    The problem of induction is sometimes motivated via a comparison between rules of induction and rules of deduction. Valid deductive rules are necessarily truth preserving, while inductive rules are not.
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  41.  27
    Gilbert Harman (1980). Reasoning and Explanatory Coherence. American Philosophical Quarterly 17 (2):151 - 157.
  42.  96
    Elizabeth Harman (2009). "I'll Be Glad I Did It" Reasoning and the Significance of Future Desires. In John Hawthorne (ed.), Ethics. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. 177-199.
    We use “I’ll be glad I did it” reasoning all the time. For example, last night I was trying to decide whether to work on this paper or go out to a movie. I realized that if I worked on the paper, then today I would be glad I did it. Whereas, if I went out to the movie, today I would regret it. This enabled me to see that I should work on the paper rather than going out to (...)
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  43. Gilbert Harman (2009). Field on the Normative Role of Logic. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):333 - 335.
    I begin by summarizing the first two chapters of (Harman 1986). The first chapter stresses the importance of not confusing inference with implication and of not confusing reasoning with the sort of argument studied in deductive logic. Inference and reasoning are psychological events or processes that can be done more or less well. The sort of implication and argument studied in deductive logic have to do with relations among propositions and with structures of propositions distinguished into premises, intermediate steps, and (...)
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  44. Gilbert Harman (1996). Qualia and Color Concepts. Philosophical Issues 7:75-79.
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  45. Donald Davidson & Gilbert Harman (1970). Semantics of Natural Language. Synthese 22 (1-2):1-2.
  46. Gilbert H. Harman (1967). Toward a Theory of Intrinsic Value. Journal of Philosophy 64 (23):792-804.
    In this paper I examine what I will call "the standard account" of intrinsic value as it appears in recent textbooks written by John Hospers, William Frankena, and Richard B. Brandt. I argue: (a) it is not clear whether a theory of intrinsic value can be developed along the lines of the standard account; (b) if one is to develop such a theory, one will need to introduce a notion of "basic intrinsic value" in addition to the notion of "intrinsic (...)
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  47. Gilbert H. Harman (1968). Enumerative Induction as Inference to the Best Explanation. Journal of Philosophy 65 (18):529-533.
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  48.  38
    Graham Harman (2010). Towards Speculative Realism: Essays and Lectures. Zero Books.
    These writings chart Harman's rise from Chicago sportswriter to co-founder of one of Europe's most promising philosophical movements: Speculative Realism. In 1997, Graham Harman was an obscure graduate student covering Chicago sporting events for a California website. Unpublished in philosophy at the time, he was already a popular conference speaker on Heidegger and related themes. Little more than a decade later, as the author of stimulating and highly visible books on continental philosophy, he was Associate Vice Provost for Research at (...)
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  49. Ray Brassier, Iain Hamilton Grant, Graham Harman & Quentin Meillassoux (2007). Speculative Realism. Collapse:306-449.
  50.  43
    Elizabeth Harman (2009). Harming as Causing Harm. In M. A. Roberts & D. T. Wasserman (eds.), Harming Future Persons. Springer Verlag 137--154.
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