96 found
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  1.  1
    Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne, The Neoplatonic Socrates.
    In The Neoplatonic Socrates, leading scholars in classics and philosophy address this gap by examining Neoplatonic attitudes toward the Socratic method, Socratic love, Socrates's divine mission and moral example, and the much-debated issue of moral rectitude. Collectively, they demonstrate the importance of Socrates for the majority of Neoplatonists, a point that has often been questioned owing to the comparative neglect of surviving commentaries on the Alcibiades, Gorgias, Phaedo, and Phaedrus, in favor of dialogues dealing explicitly with metaphysical issues. Supplemented with (...)
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  2.  7
    Rick Benitez & Harold Tarrant, Philosophy.
    The study of the dialectic between philosophy and religion in antiquity informs us about how religion was conceived and how philosophers contributed to the development of religious thinking. We review the philosophy and religion dialectic from the end of the sixth century BCE to the second century CE, focusing more on theology, mythology, and personal religious experience, than on cult practices of polis and oikos. In general, philosophers accepted that conventional religion had an essential place in Greek culture. Competition arose (...)
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  3.  23
    Harold Tarrant (2000). The Philosophy of Socrates. Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):473-478.
  4.  17
    Harold Tarrant (2003). Turning Toward Philosophy. Ancient Philosophy 23 (2):435-439.
  5. Hayden W. Ausland, Eugenio Benitez, Ruby Blondell, Lloyd P. Gerson, Francisco J. Gonzalez, J. J. Mulhern, Debra Nails, Erik Ostenfeld, Gerald A. Press, Gary Alan Scott, P. Christopher Smith, Harold Tarrant, Holger Thesleff, Joanne Waugh, William A. Welton & Elinor J. M. West (2000). Who Speaks for Plato?: Studies in Platonic Anonymity. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this international and interdisciplinary collection of critical essays, distinguished contributors examine a crucial premise of traditional readings of Plato's dialogues: that Plato's own doctrines and arguments can be read off the statements made in the dialogues by Socrates and other leading characters. The authors argue in general and with reference to specific dialogues, that no character should be taken to be Plato's mouthpiece. This is essential reading for students and scholars of Plato.
     
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  6.  20
    Harold Tarrant (2002). Philo of Larissa. Ancient Philosophy 22 (2):485-492.
  7.  7
    Harold Tarrant (2014). Aristotle, Plato and Pythagoreanism in the First Century BC: New Directions for Philosophy Editor by Malcolm Schofield. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):840-841.
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  8.  9
    Harold Tarrant (1985). Scepticism or Platonism?: The Philosophy of the Fourth Academy. Cambridge University Press.
    In the first half of the first century BC the Academy of Athens broke up in disarray. From the wreckage of the semi-sceptical school there arose the new dogmatic philosophy of Antiochus, synthesised from Stoicism and Platonism, and the hardline Pyrrhonist scepticism of Aenesidemus. With his extensive knowledge of the ways in which Plato was read and invoked as an authority in late antiquity Dr Tarrant builds a most impressive reconstruction of Philo of Larissa's brand of Platonism and of its (...)
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  9.  18
    Harold Tarrant (2005). Socratic Synousia : A Post-Platonic Myth? Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (2):131-155.
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  10. Harold Tarrant (2008). Eudorus and the Early Platonist Interpretation of the Categories. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 64 (3):583-595.
    La tradition herméneutique concernant les Catégories d’Aristote remonte à Eudore et à ses contemporains du premier siècle av. J.-C. Pour interpréter ce texte difficile, il faut que les disciples de Platon considèrent quelques problèmes nouveaux de la dialectique. Les critiques d’Eudore manifestent le désir d’un ordre rigoureux, et elles posent des questions auxquelles la tradition herméneutique, culminant dans le magnifique commentaire de Simplicius, tentera de répondre. Le projet critique d’Eudore ne nous permet pas de parler d’un «ennemi d’Aristote», ni de (...)
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  11.  8
    Harold Tarrant (2008). The Heirs of Plato. Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):244-247.
  12.  5
    Harold Tarrant, Athletics, Competition and the Intellectual.
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  13.  2
    Harold Tarrant (2000). Plato's First Interpreters. Cornell University Press.
    Harold Tarrant here explores ancient attempts to interpret Plato's writings, by philosophers who spoke a Greek close to Plato's own, and provides a fresh, ...
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  14.  6
    Harold Tarrant (2001). How Can Platonist Writing Be Introduced? Apeiron 34 (4):329 - 347.
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  15.  29
    Harold Tarrant (2011). Proclus: Commentary on the First Alcibiades. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (2):315-316.
    This article is currently available as a free download on ingentaconnect.
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  16.  11
    Harold Tarrant (1997). Der Platoniker Tauros in der Darstellung des Aulus Gellius. Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (2):294-296.
    This detailed commentary of Gellius' accounts of his teacher Taurus reconstructs the picture of this Middle Platonic philosopher as teacher and man and conveys interesting insights into the practice of philosophical teaching in the second century A.D. A collection of all testimonies and fragments of Taurus is added.
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  17.  4
    Harold Tarrant (2009). Living by the Cratylus Hermeneutics and Philosophic Names in the Roman Empire. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 3 (1):1-25.
    This paper is about an aspect of philosophic life, showing, in the case of one Platonic dialogue in particular, that the texts that later Platonists employed in a quasi-scriptural capacity could influence their lives in important ways. The Cratylus was seen as addressing the question of how names could be regarded as 'correct', raising the role of the name-giver to the level of the law-giver. It begins with the question of how a personal name could be correct. The ancient text (...)
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  18.  4
    Harold Tarrant (1993). The Gorgias as Philosophic Literature. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (2):248-249.
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  19.  23
    Harold Tarrant, Eugenio E. Benitez & Terry Roberts (2011). The Mythical Voice in the Timaeus-Critias. Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):95-120.
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  20.  1
    Harold Tarrant (1993). Thrasyllan Platonism. Cornell University Press.
  21.  9
    Harold Tarrant (1995). Introducing Philosophers and Philosophies. Apeiron 28 (2):141 - 158.
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  22.  9
    Harold Tarrant (2004). Development, Non-Philosophers, and Laws. Polis 21 (1-2):147-159.
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  23.  12
    Harold Tarrant, Socratic Method and Socratic Truth.
    Readers of the early dialogues of Plato may soon feel that his Socrates proceeds methodically towards the ultimate embarrassment of his verbal wrestling-partners. Several recurrent tactics are easily identified, giving credence to claims that Socrates has a method. As Aristotle saw, he demanded universal definitions and he employed epagōgē. He elicited from an interlocutor whose belief he would question certain other beliefs, seemingly more fundamental, entailing the contradiction of the original belief. He flattered, hassled, cajoled, and criticized. He employed his (...)
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  24.  10
    Harold Tarrant (2013). J.B. Kennedy: The Musical Structure of Plato's Dialogues, Acumen, Durham, Pb. ISBN 184465267X. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 7 (2):244-245.
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  25.  8
    Harold Tarrant (1992). Plato the Pious Michael L. Morgan: Platonic Piety: Philosophy and Ritual in Fourth-Century Athens. Pp. X + 273. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1990. £25. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):72-74.
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  26.  3
    Harold Tarrant (2013). Socrates' Other Voices:?Euthyphro' in the Cratylus. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 80 (4):507.
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  27.  8
    Harold Tarrant (1988). Midwifery and the Clouds. Classical Quarterly 38 (01):116-.
    Julius Tomin has recently questioned the new orthodoxy, stemming from Burnyeat's impressive article, that Socratic midwifery is not genuinely Socratic. I understand that many will feel the need to question Burnyeat's position, but I am unhappy that Aristophanes' comedy has once again been thought to give support to the view that Socrates had been known as an intellectual midwife. Thus my response will concentrate on our understanding of Clouds, and in particular on the key passage at 135ff.
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  28.  13
    Harold Tarrant (2000). Diogenes of Sinope. Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):210-214.
  29.  3
    Harold Tarrant (1984). Zeno on Knowledge or on Geometry? The Evidence of Anon. In Theaetetum'. Phronesis 29 (1):96-99.
  30.  27
    Harold Tarrant (2007). Olympiodorus and Proclus on the Climax of the Alcibiades. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 1 (1):3-29.
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  31.  11
    Harold Tarrant (2004). The Heirs of Plato.: A Study of the Old Academy (347-274 BC), by John Dillon. Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):244-247.
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  32.  11
    Harold Tarrant (2012). Proclus in Timaevm Martijn Proclus on Nature. Philosophy of Nature and Its Methods in Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Pp. X + 360. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Cased, €121, US$179. ISBN: 978-90-04-18191-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 62 (1):128-130.
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  33.  6
    Harold Tarrant (1993). Domenico Pesce: Il Platone di Tubinga, e duo studi sulla Stoicismo. (Antichità Classica e Cristiana, 30.) Pp. 107. Brescia: Paideia, 1990. Paper, L. 20,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (01):187-.
  34.  10
    Harold Tarrant (2009). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement? Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):240-247.
  35.  6
    Harold Tarrant (1993). The Gorgias as Philosophic Literature S. N. Pieri: Platone, Gorgia. (Collana di Filosofi Antichi, Nuova Serie, 1.) Pp. viii + 557. Naples: Loffredo, 1991. Paper, L. 70,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (02):248-249.
  36.  5
    Harold Tarrant (1984). Zeno on Knowledge or on Geometry? The Evidence of Anon. In Theaetetum. Phronesis 29 (1):96-99.
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  37.  13
    Harold Tarrant (1997). Restoring Olympiodorus' Syllogistic. Ancient Philosophy 17 (2):411-424.
  38.  21
    Harold Tarrant (2000). Reason, Faith, and Authority: Some Platonist Debates About the Authority of the Teacher. Sophia 39 (1):46-63.
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  39.  5
    Harold Tarrant (1993). Symposiaca R. E. Allen (Tr.): The Dialogues of Plato, Vol. 2: The Symposium. Translated with Comment. Pp. Xii + 178; 1 Illustration. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1991. £16.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (01):24-26.
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  40.  5
    Harold Tarrant (1998). Aristotle on Socratic Communism. The Classical Review 48 (2):352-353.
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  41.  2
    Harold Tarrant (2009). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement?: Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):240-247.
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  42.  11
    Harold Tarrant (1994). Platonic Method L. C. H. Chen: Acquiring Knowledge of the Ideas: A Study of Plato's Methods in the Phaedo, the Symposium, and the Central Books of the Republic. (Palingenesia, 35.) Pp. X + 248. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1992. Paper, DM 76. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):82-84.
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  43.  1
    Harold Tarrant (2014). Proclus: An Introduction by Radek Chlup. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):166-167.
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  44.  4
    Harold Tarrant (2007). Atlantis: Myths, Ancient and Modern. The European Legacy 12 (2):159-172.
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  45.  4
    Harold Tarrant & Eugenio Benitez (2007). Introduction. The European Legacy 12 (2):133-139.
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  46.  7
    Harold Tarrant (1983). The Conclusion of Parmenides' Poem. Apeiron 17 (2):73 - 84.
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  47.  8
    Harold Tarrant (1987). Peripatetic and Stoic Epistemology in Boethus and Antiochus. Apeiron 20 (1):17 - 37.
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  48.  10
    Harold Tarrant (2008). Proclus (C.) Steel Procli in Platonis Parmenidem Commentaria. Volumen I Libros I–III Continens. Co-Edited by Caroline Macé and Pieter d'Hoine. Pp. Liv + 300. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007. Cased, £37.50. ISBN: 978-0-19-929181-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (02):434-.
  49.  7
    Harold Tarrant (1990). Philodemus on the Academy Konrad Gaiser: Philodems Academica: die Bericht über Platon und die Alte Akademie in zwei herkulanensischen Papyri. (Supplementum Platonicum: die Texte der indirekten Platon-überlieferung, 1.) Pp. 573. Stuttgart and Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog, 1988. DM 425. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (01):12-14.
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  50.  6
    Harold Tarrant (1991). The New Budé of Plato's Symposium Léon Robin, Paul Vicaire: Platon, Oeuvres Complètes, Tome IV, 2e Partie: Le Banquet. Notice de Léon Robin, Texte Établi Et Traduit Par Paul Vicaire, Avec le Concours de Jean Laborderie. (Collection des Universités de France, Budé.) Pp. Cxxiii + 93 (Text Double). Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1989. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):27-28.
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