Search results for 'Harrell Chesson' (try it on Scholar)

79 found
Order:
  1.  32
    W. Kip Viscusi & Harrell Chesson (1999). Hopes and Fears: The Conflicting Effects of Risk Ambiguity. Theory and Decision 47 (2):157-184.
    The Ellsberg Paradox documented the aversion to ambiguity in the probability of winning a prize. Using an original sample of 266 business owners and managers facing risks from climate change, this paper documents the presence of departures from rationality in both directions. Both ambiguity-seeking behavior and ambiguity-averse behavior are evident. People exhibit ‘fear’ effects of ambiguity for small probabilities of suffering a loss and ‘hope’ effects for large probabilities. Estimates of the crossover point from ambiguity aversion (fear) to ambiguity seeking (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  2.  27
    Harrell W. Chesson & W. Kip Viscusi (2003). Commonalities in Time and Ambiguity Aversion for Long-Term Risks. Theory and Decision 54 (1):57-71.
    Optimal protective responses to long-term risks depend on rational perceptions of ambiguous risks and uncertain time horizons. Our study examined the joint influence of uncertain delay and risk in an original sample of business owners and managers. We found that many subjects disliked uncertainty in the timing of an outcome, a reaction we term ``lottery timing risk aversion.'' Such aversion to uncertain timing was positively related to aversion to ambiguous probabilities for lotteries involving storm damage risks. This association suggests that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3.  11
    Maralee Harrell, The Improvement of Critical Thinking Skills in What Philosophy.
    Maralee Harrell. The Improvement of Critical Thinking Skills in What Philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  4
    Jean G. Harrell (1992). Profundity: A Universal Value. Penn State University Press.
    Harrell contends, to the contrary, that there exists one major value that is universal to humans, regardless of context. That value is profundity, or depth.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Jean G. Harrell (2008). Profundity: A Universal Value. Penn State University Press.
    The crisis or "death" of philosophy currently identified both within and outside professional circles is commonly attributed to the failure to find universals in metaphysics, epistemology, and, most obviously, in valuational judgment. _Profundity_ concentrates on an assumption uniformly upheld in the theory of value, that all human values are contextually dependent. Harrell contends, to the contrary, that there exists one major value that is universal to humans, regardless of context. That value is profundity, or depth. Considering how "profundity" is (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  69
    Samuel P. Harrell (forthcoming). Book Review: The Common Task: A Theology of Christian Mission. [REVIEW] Interpretation 54 (1):106-108.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  22
    Caroline Walker Bynum, Stevan Harrell & Paula Richman (1991). Gender and Religion: On the Complexity of Symbols. Philosophy East and West 41 (4):594-598.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8. Michael Friedman, Robert DiSalle, J. D. Trout, Shaun Nichols, Maralee Harrell, Clark Glymour, Carl G. Wagner, Kent W. Staley, Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla & Frederick M. Kronz (2002). 10. Interpreting Quantum Field Theory Interpreting Quantum Field Theory (Pp. 348-378). Philosophy of Science 69 (2).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  9. Jean G. Harrell (1980). Kant's a Priori in Critique of Judgment. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (2):198-200.
  10.  4
    David Danks & Maralee Harrell, Chaos, Causation, and Describing Dynamics.
    A standard platitude about the function of causal knowledge or theories is that they are valuable because they support prediction, explanation, and control. Knowledge of predator-prey relations enables us to predict future animal populations, as well as design policies or interventions that help influence those populations. If we understand the underlying biochemical mechanisms of some disease, then we can predict who is at risk for it, explain why it produces particular symptoms, and develop interventions to try to reduce its prevalence (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  14
    C. Janna Harrell, Ken R. Smith & Geraldine P. Mineau (2008). Are Girls Good and Boys Bad for Parental Longevity? Human Nature 19 (1):56-69.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  17
    Maralee Harrell, Using Argument Diagramming Software to Teach Critical Thinking Skills.
    There is substantial evidence from many domains that visual representations aid various forms of cognition. We aimed to determine whether visual representations of argument structure enhanced the acquisition and development of critical thinking skills within the context of an introductory philosophy course. We found a significant effect of the use of argument diagrams, and this effect was stable even when multiple plausible correlates were controlled for. These results suggest that natural and relatively minor modifications to standard critical thinking courses could (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. M. Harrell (1996). Confirmation Holism and Semantic Holism. Synthese 109 (1):63-101.
    Fodor and Lepore, in their recent book "Holism," maintain that if an inference from semantic anatomism to semantic holism is allowed, certain fairly deleterious consequences follow. In Section 1 Fodor and Lepore's terminology is construed and amended where necessary with the result that the aforementioned deleterious consequences are neither so apparent nor straightforward as they had suggested. In Section 2 their "Argument A" is considered in some detail. In Section 3 their "argument attributed to Quine" is examined at length and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  25
    Maralee Harrell & Clark Glymour (2002). Confirmation And Chaos. Philosophy of Science 69 (2):256-265.
    Recently, Rueger and Sharp (1996) and Koperski (1998) have been concerned to show that certain procedural accounts of model confirmation are compromised by non-linear dynamics. We suggest that the issues raised are better approached by considering whether chaotic data analysis methods allow for reliable inference from data. We provide a framework and an example of this approach.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  29
    Maralee Harrell, Using Argument Diagrams to Improve Critical Thinking Skills in 80-100 What Philosophy Is.
    After determining one set of skills that we hoped our students were learning in the introductory philosophy class at Carnegie Mellon University, we designed an experiment, performed twice over the course of two semesters, to test whether they were actually learning these skills. In addition, there were four different lectures of this course in the Spring of 2004, and five in the Fall of 2004; and the students of Lecturer I were taught the material using argument diagrams as a tool (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  1
    Andrew Plunk & Paul T. Harrell (2016). Barriers To Research Using Controlled Drugs Are Not Created Equal. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (4):54-56.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  12
    Maralee Harrell (2008). No Computer Program Required. Teaching Philosophy 31 (4):351-374.
    Argument-mapping software abounds, and one of the reasons is that using the software has been shown to teach/promote/improve critical-thinking skills. These positive results are very encouraging, but they also raise the question of whether the computer tutorial environment is producing these results, or whether learning argument mapping, even with just paper and pencil, is sufficient. Based on the results of two empirical studies, I argue that the basic skill of being able to represent an argument diagrammatically plays an important role (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  3
    Maralee Harrell, Argument Diagramming and Critical Thinking in Introductory Philosophy.
    In a multi-study naturalistic quasi-experiment involving 269 students in a semester-long introductory philosophy course, we investigated the effect of teaching argument diagramming on students’ scores on argument analysis tasks. An argument diagram is a visual representation of the content and structure of an argument. In each study, all of the students completed pre- and posttests containing argument analysis tasks. During the semester, the treatment group was taught AD, while the control group was not. The results were that among the different (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  12
    Jean G. Harrell (1969). Thrice-Born: Selected Memories of an Immigrant. Journal of the History of Philosophy 7 (3):351-352.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  30
    Maralee Harrell (2012). Assessing the Efficacy of Argument Diagramming to Teach Critical Thinking Skills in Introduction to Philosophy. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 27 (2):31-39.
    After determining one set of skills that we hoped our students were learning in the introductory philosophy class at Carnegie Mellon University, we performed an experiment twice over the course of two semesters to test whether they were actually learning these skills. In addition, there were four different lectures of this course in the first semester, and five in the second; in each semester students in some lectures were taught the material using argument diagrams as a tool to aid understanding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  5
    R. Amer, S. Bourdet-Loubère, I. Brocas, R. G. Brody, M. H. Broihanne, D. Cardona-Coll, H. W. Chesson, T. Clausing, P. Corcho & J. M. Coulter (2003). Theory and Decison. Theory and Decision 54 (376).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  6
    Jean G. Harrell (1966). The Unique Once More. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 25 (2):171-175.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  34
    Mara Harrell, Creating Argument Diagrams.
    The word “philosophy” comes from the Greek “philos” (meaning love) and “sophia” (meaning wisdom); thus philosophy literally is the “love of wisdom.” Whatever else philosophy may be, most people agree that it still retains this spirit of its etymological roots, and that when we are engaged in philosophy we are pursuing wisdom for the sake of itself. Wisdom, however, is not the same thing as knowledge or information. We aren’t merely trying to amass list of interesting ideas, or believe anything (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  31
    Jean Gabbert Harrell (1953). Vagueness and Ambiguity in Value Theory. Journal of Philosophy 50 (13):384-385.
  25.  23
    Jean Gabbert Harrell (1951). Value, Vagueness, and Verifiability. Journal of Philosophy 48 (19):587-588.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  10
    Maralee Harrell (2005). Using Argument Diagramming Software in the Classroom. Teaching Philosophy 28 (2):163-177.
    Many undergraduates, philosophy majors included, read philosophical texts similar to the way they read stories. One method for teaching students how to discern the argumentative structure of a philosophy text is through argument diagrams . This paper provides criteria for an ideal argument diagramming software and then reviews the strengths and weaknesses of such software currently available, e.g. Araucaria, Argutect, Athena Standard, Inspiration, and Reason!Able.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  1
    Maralee Harrell & Danielle Wetzel, Improving First-Year Writing Using Argument Diagramming.
    There is substantial evidence from many domains that visual representations aid various forms of cognition. We aimed to determine whether learning to construct visual representations of argument structure enhanced the acquisition and development of argumentative writing skills within the context of first-year college writing course. We found a significant effect of the use of argument diagrams, and this effect was stable even when multiple plausible correlates were controlled for. These results suggest that natural⎯and relatively minor⎯modifications to standard first-year composition courses (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  7
    Maralee Harrell (2011). Understanding, Evaluating, and Producing Arguments: Training is Necessary for Reasoning Skills. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):80-81.
    This commentary suggests that the general population has much less reasoning skill than is claimed by Mercier & Sperber (M&S). In particular, many studies suggest that the skills of understanding, evaluating, and producing arguments are generally poor in the population of people who have not had specific training.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  22
    Maralee Harrell & Clark Glymour (2002). Confirmation and Chaos. Philosophy of Science 69 (2):256-265.
    Recently, Rueger and Sharp (1996) and Koperski (1998) have been concerned to show that certain procedural accounts of model confirmation are compromised by non‐linear dynamics. We suggest that the issues raised are better approached by considering whether chaotic data analysis methods allow for reliable inference from data. We provide a framework and an example of this approach.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  15
    Mara Harrell, No Computer Program Required: Even Pencil-and-Paper Argument Mapping Improves Critical Thinking Skills.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  3
    Pamela Esprívalo Harrell (2009). Do State Examinations Measure Teacher Quality? Educational Studies 35 (1):65-79.
    This study investigates teacher content knowledge of candidates enrolled in an online graduate teacher certification programme. Descriptive data and linear regression were used to draw conclusions about the content area knowledge of individuals in the sample and the significance of the predictors examined. Descriptive data show 1/3 of the 8–12 life science candidates and 2/5 of the 8–12 mathematics candidates fail the state content examination although a transcript analysis indicates candidates have strong content preparation, high grade point averages and recent (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  13
    Maralee Harrell (2005). Grading According to a Rubric. Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):3-15.
    Drawing on the work of Linda Farmer, this article describes a detailed grading grid coupled with a rubric designed for the purpose of assessing argumentative papers. The rubric consists of two main parts: Content and Style. Relying upon Bloom’s taxonomy of learning, the “Content” part of the rubric assesses a student’s understanding of the material, the argument of their paper, and various abilities concerning analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and creation. The “Style” part of the rubric is split into two parts: Clarity (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  21
    Bill J. Harrell (1998). Hayek: The Iron Cage of Liberty, Andrew Gamble. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (2):269-274.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  20
    Jean G. Harrell (1990). Phenomenology of Film Music. Journal of Value Inquiry 14 (1):23-34.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  13
    Jean Gabbert Harrell (1950). A Note on Artistic Criticism. Journal of Philosophy 47 (18):530-532.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  11
    Daniel Harrell (1995). Philosophical Historicism and the Betrayal of First Philosophy. New Vico Studies 13:103-105.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  1
    John V. Harrell & Stephen C. Fowler (1977). Amount of Reinforcer and Differentiation of Response Force. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (5):358-360.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  12
    Bohdan Dziemidok & Jean G. Harrell (1976). Tatarkiewicz and the History of Aesthetics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (2):222-226.
  39.  2
    Maralee Harrell (2013). THiNK: Critical Thinking for Everyday Life By Judith A. Boss. [REVIEW] Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 28 (3):51-58.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  9
    Jean G. Harrell (1997). There Ought to Be a Law. Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (1):61-72.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  5
    Jean Gabbert Harrell (1957). Philosophical "Poignance" and "Freshness". Journal of Philosophy 54 (18):541-549.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  5
    Jean G. Harrell (1997). The Fine Art of Repetition. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):139-140.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  8
    Jean G. Harrell (1972). The Letters of Josiah Royce. Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (2):239-241.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  5
    Jean G. Harrell (1964). Issues of Music Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 23 (2):197-206.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  2
    Ivan L. Harrell & Thomas N. Hollins Jr (2009). Working with Disruptive Students. Inquiry 14 (1):69-75.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  1
    H. F. J., Carleton Stanley & H. C. Harrell (1936). Roots of the TreePublic Arbitration in Athenian Law. Journal of Hellenic Studies 56:263.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  2
    Jean G. Harrell (1995). The Interpretation of Music. International Studies in Philosophy 27 (4):118-119.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  1
    Heather Harrell (2009). Currents in Contemporary Ethics. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37 (4):846-851.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young (2005). Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader. Sheed & Ward.
    Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James Phelan, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Joseph Goguen & Fox Harrell (forthcoming). Foundations for Active Multimedia Narrative: Semiotic Spaces and Structural Blending. Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 79