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Profile: James G. Hart (Indiana University, Bloomington)
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  1.  45
    H. L. A. Hart (1994). The Concept of Law. Oxford University Press.
    The Concept of Law is the most important and original work of legal philosophy written this century. First published in 1961, it is considered the masterpiece of H.L.A. Hart's enormous contribution to the study of jurisprudence and legal philosophy. Its elegant language and balanced arguments have sparked wide debate and unprecedented growth in the quantity and quality of scholarship in this area--much of it devoted to attacking or defending Hart's theories. Principal among Hart's critics is renowned lawyer and political philosopher (...)
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  2. H. L. A. Hart (2008). Punishment and Responsibility: Essays in the Philosophy of Law. OUP Oxford.
    This classic collection of essays, first published in 1968, represents H.L.A. Hart's landmark contribution to the philosophy of criminal responsibility and punishment. Unavailable for ten years, this new edition reproduces the original text, adding a new critical introduction by John Gardner, a leading contemporary criminal law theorist.
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  3. H. L. A. Hart (1955). Are There Any Natural Rights? Philosophical Review 64 (2):175-191.
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  4. H. L. A. Hart (1983). Essays in Jurisprudence and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This important collection of essays includes Professor Hart's first defense of legal positivism; his discussion of the distinctive teaching of American and Scandinavian jurisprudence; an examination of theories of basic human rights and the notion of "social solidarity," and essays on Jhering, Kelsen, Holmes, and Lon Fuller.
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  5. H. L. A. Hart (1970). Punishment and Responsibility. Philosophy 45 (172):162-162.
     
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  6. C. L. Hart, I. J. Deary, G. Davey Smith, M. N. Upton, L. J. Whalley, J. M. Starr, D. J. Hole, V. Wilson & G. C. M. Watt (2005). Childhood IQ of Parents Related to Characteristics of Their Offspring: Linking the Scottish Mental Survey 1932 to the Midspan Family Study. Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (5):623.
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  7. H. L. A. Hart (1982). Essays on Bentham: Jurisprudence and Political Philosophy. OUP Oxford.
    In his introduction to these closely linked essays Professor Hart offers both an exposition and a critical assessment of some central issues in jurisprudence and political theory. Some of the essays touch on themes to which little attention has been paid, such as Bentham's identification of the forms of mysitification protecting the law from criticism; his relation to Beccaria; and his conversion to democratic radicalism and a passionate admiration for the United States.
     
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  8. Kevin Hart (2008). It/is True. Studia Phaenomenologica 8 (1):219-239.
    Following a hint from Edmund Husserl, this paper explores the proximity of the phenomenological and aesthetic gazes. It does so with one particular poem in mind: “September Song” by Geoffrey Hill. The paper examines the ways in which the poem responds to a given situation, the death of a child in the Shoah, and responds to the ethical status of its own aesthetic gaze. Phenomenological perspectives by Merleau-Ponty, Levinas, Derrida, and Marion, are brought to bear on the questions considered, and (...)
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  9.  4
    H. L. A. Hart (1962). Causation in the Law. Philosophy 37 (139):83-84.
    An updated and extended second edition supporting the findings of its well-known predecessor which claimed that courts employ common-sense notions of causation in determining legal responsibility.
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  10.  9
    W. A. Hart, Place of Moral Action in Ethics.
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  11.  44
    Katherine Alfredo & Hillary Hart (2011). The University and the Responsible Conduct of Research: Who is Responsible for What? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):447-457.
    Research misconduct has been thoroughly discussed in the literature, but mainly in terms of definitions and prescriptions for proper conduct. Even when case studies are cited, they are generally used as a repository of “lessons learned.” What has been lacking from this conversation is how the lessons of responsible conduct of research are imparted in the first place to graduate students, especially those in technical fields such as engineering. Nor has there been much conversation about who is responsible for what (...)
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  12.  6
    H. L. A. Hart (1964). Law, Liberty, and Morality. Philosophical Review 73 (2):271-274.
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  13. Bruce Hart, Gilles Hennenfent, Joe Macquaker & Harry Rowe (2015). Introduction to Special Section: Shale Paleoenvironments. Interpretation 3 (1):SHi-SHi.
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  14. Thomas E. Hearon, Mark G. Rowan, Katherine A. Giles & William H. Hart (2014). Halokinetic Deformation Adjacent to the Deepwater Auger Diapir, Garden Banks 470, Northern Gulf of Mexico: Testing the Applicability of an Outcrop-Based Model Using Subsurface Data. Interpretation 2 (4):SM57-SM76.
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  15.  60
    William D. Hart (1988). The Engines of the Soul. Cambridge University Press.
    Dr Hart sets out to answer this question by showing that the issue is as much about the nature of causation as it is about the natures of mind and matter.
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  16.  49
    Susan Margaret Hart (2010). Self-Regulation, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Business Case: Do They Work in Achieving Workplace Equality and Safety? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):585 - 600.
    The political shift toward an economic liberalism in many developed market economies, emphasizing the importance of the marketplace rather than government intervention in the economy and society (Dorman, Systematic Occupational Health and Safety Management: Perspectives on an International Development, 2000; Tombs, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 3(1): 24-25, 2005; Walters, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 03(2):3-19, 2005), featured a prominent discourse centered on the need for business flexibility and competitiveness in a global economy (Dorman, 2000; Tombs, (...)
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  17. David Bell & W. D. Hart (1979). The Epistemology of Abstract Objects: Access and Inference. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 53:153-165.
  18.  13
    Neil Brady & David Hart (2007). An Exploration Into the Developmental Psychology of Ethical Theory with Implications for Business Practice and Pedagogy. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (4):397 - 412.
    This article is an attempt to understand ethical theory not just as a set of well-developed philosophical perspectives but as a range of moral capacities that human beings more or less grow into over the course of their lives. To this end, we explore the connection between formal ethical theories and stage developmental psychologies, showing how individuals mature morally, regarding their duties, responsibilities, ideals, goals, values, and interests. The primary method is to extract from the writings of Kohlberg and his (...)
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  19. Bradd Hart, Byunghan Kim & Anand Pillay (2000). Coordinatisation and Canonical Bases in Simple Theories. Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (1):293-309.
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  20. Faith Elizabeth Hart (2001). The Epistemology of Cognitive Literary Studies. Philosophy and Literature 25 (2):314-334.
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  21.  19
    H. N. Castaneda, J. G. Hart & T. Kapitan (eds.) (1999). The Phenomeno-Logic of the I: Essays on Self-Consciousness. Indiana University Press.
    This unique volume will appeal to those interested in the philosophy of mind, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence as well as students of Castaneda and Latin American philosophy.
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  22. H. L. A. Hart (1982). Essays on Bentham Studies in Jurisprudence and Political Theory. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  23.  19
    Jesús Cambra-Fierro, Susan Hart & Yolanda Polo-Redondo (2008). Environmental Respect: Ethics or Simply Business? A Study in the Small and Medium Enterprise (Sme) Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):645 - 656.
    In recent years there have been ever-growing concerns regarding environmental decline, causing some companies to focus on the implementation of environmentally friendly supply, production and distribution systems. Such concern may stem either from the set of beliefs and values of the company’s management or from certain pressure exerted by the market – consumers and institutions – in the belief that an environmentally respectful management policy will contribute to the transmission of a positive image of the company and its products. Sometimes, (...)
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  24.  5
    James G. Hart (1992). The Person and the Common Life. Kluwer.
    A Husserl-based social ethics is within the noetic-noematic field as disclosed through various reductions. The focus is how at the passive and active levels a bsic sense of will is in play as well as the "telos" of subjectivity in terms of both a "godly" intersubjective ideal "we". This is inseparable form the disclosure of the full sense of person through an "absolute ought" and the "truth of will" wherein the common world and common goods are tied to an ideal (...)
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  25.  12
    Taylor Martin, Karen Rayne, Nate J. Kemp, Jack Hart & Kenneth R. Diller (2005). Teaching for Adaptive Expertise in Biomedical Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):257-276.
    This paper considers an approach to teaching ethics in bioengineering based on the How People Learn (HPL) framework. Curricula based on this framework have been effective in mathematics and science instruction from the kindergarten to the college levels. This framework is well suited to teaching bioengineering ethics because it helps learners develop “adaptive expertise”. Adaptive expertise refers to the ability to use knowledge and experience in a domain to learn in unanticipated situations. It differs from routine expertise, which requires using (...)
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  26. J. T. Hart (1965). Memory and the Feeling-of-Knowing Experience. Journal of Educational Psychology 56:208-16.
  27. Bruce S. Hart, Joe H. S. Macquaker & Kevin G. Taylor (2013). Mudstone Depositional and Diagenetic Processes: Implications for Seismic Analyses of Source-Rock Reservoirs. Interpretation 1 (1):B7-B26.
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  28. Stuart Hampshire & H. L. A. Hart (1958). Decision, Intention and Certainty. Mind 67 (265):1-12.
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  29. H. L. A. Hart, P. M. S. Hacker & Joseph Raz (eds.) (1977). Law, Morality, and Society: Essays in Honour of H. L. A. Hart. Clarendon Press.
    Hacker, P. M. S. Hart's philosophy of law.--Baker, G. P. Defeasibility and meaning.--Dworkin, R. M. No right answer?-Lucas, J. R. The phenomenon of law.--Honoré, A. M. Real laws.--Summers, R. S. Naïve instrumentalism and the law.--Marshall, G. Positivism, adjudication, and democracy.--Cross, R. The House of Lords and the rules of precedent.--Kenny, A. J. P. Intention and mens rea in murder.--Mackie, J. L. The grounds of responsibility.--MacCormick, D. N. Rights in legislation.--Raz, J. Promises and obligations.--Foot, P. R. Approval and disapproval.--Finnis, J. M. (...)
     
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  30.  35
    Casey Hart & Michael G. Titelbaum (2015). Intuitive Dilation? Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (4):252-262.
    Roger White objects to interval-valued credence theories because they produce a counterintuitive “dilation” effect in a story he calls the Coin Game. We respond that results in the Coin Game were bound to be counterintuitive anyway, because the story involves an agent who learns a biconditional. Biconditional updates produce surprising results whether the credences involved are ranged or precise, so White's story is no counterexample to ranged credence theories.
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  31.  10
    David W. Hart & Jeffery A. Thompson (2007). Untangling Employee Loyalty: A Psychological Contract Perspective. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (2):297-323.
    Although business ethicists have theorized frequently about the virtues and vices of employee loyalty, the concept of loyalty remainsloosely defined. In this article, we argue that viewing loyalty as a cognitive phenomenon—an attitude that resides in the mind of theindividual—helps to clarify definitional inconsistencies, provides a finer-grained analysis of the concept, and sheds additional light on theethical implications of loyalty in organizations. Specifically, we adopt the psychological contract perspective to analyze loyalty’s cognitivedimensions, and treat loyalty as an individual-level construction of (...)
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  32. C. Hart (1997). Book Reviews : Understanding Paul's Ethics: Twentieth-Century Approaches, Edited by Brian S. Rosner. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans & Carlisle: Paternoster, 1995. 377 Pp. Pb. 14.99. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 10 (1):128-131.
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  33.  6
    Hla Hart (2016). The New Challenge to Legal Positivism. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 36 (3):459-475.
    English translation of a lecture delivered by HLA Hart on 29 October 1979 at the Autonomous University of Madrid. For commentary on the provenance of the lecture and on the methodology of its translation, see Andrzej Grabowski, ‘The Missing Link in the Hart–Dworkin Debate’ 36 Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 476.
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  34. W. D. Hart (ed.) (1996). The Philosophy of Mathematics. Oxford University Press.
    This volume offers a selection of the most interesting and important work from recent years in the philosophy of mathematics, which has always been closely linked to, and has exerted a significant influence upon, the main stream of analytical philosophy. The issues discussed are of interest throughout philosophy, and no mathematical expertise is required of the reader. Contributors include W.V. Quine, W.D. Hart, Michael Dummett, Charles Parsons, Paul Benacerraf, Penelope Maddy, W.W. Tait, Hilary Putnam, George Boolos, Daniel Isaacson, Stewart Shapiro, (...)
     
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  35. David Bentley Hart (2013). The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, Bliss. Yale University Press.
    Despite the recent ferocious public debate about belief, the concept most central to the discussion—God—frequently remains vaguely and obscurely described. Are those engaged in these arguments even talking about the same thing? In a wide-ranging response to this confusion, esteemed scholar David Bentley Hart pursues a clarification of how the word “God” functions in the world’s great theistic faiths. Ranging broadly across Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Vedantic and Bhaktic Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism, Hart explores how these great intellectual traditions treat humanity’s (...)
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  36.  6
    William David Hart (2014). Slaves, Fetuses, and Animals. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (4):661-690.
    This essay is an exploration in ethical rhetoric, specifically, the ethics of comparing the status of fetuses and animals to enslaved Africans. On the view of those who make such comparisons, the fetus is treated as a slave through abortion, reproductive technologies, and stem cell research, while animals are enslaved through factory farming, experimentation, and as laborers, circus performers, and the like. I explore how the apotheosis of the fetus and the humanization of animals represent the flipside of the subjugation (...)
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  37.  2
    Rhiannon E. Hart & Jonathan W. Schooler (2012). Suppression of Novel Stimuli: Changes in Accessibility of Suppressed Nonverbalizable Shapes. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1541-1546.
    Recently, a new method of considering successful intentional thought suppression has emerged. This method, the think/no-think paradigm has been utilized over a multitude of settings and has fairly robustly demonstrated the ability to interfere with memory recall. The following experiment examined the effect of intentional thought suppression on recognition memory of nonverbalizeable shapes. In this experiment, participants learned word–shape targets. For some of the pairs, they rehearsed the shape when presented with the word; for others, they suppressed the shape when (...)
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  38.  62
    W. D. Hart & Colin McGinn (1976). Knowledge and Necessity. Journal of Philosophical Logic 5 (2):205 - 208.
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  39. H. L. A. Hart (1951). The Ascription of Responsibility and Rights. In Gilbert Ryle & Antony Flew (eds.), Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society. B. Blackwell 171 - 194.
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  40.  6
    John Hart (2009). Machlup's Misrepresentation of Hutchison's Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):325-340.
    Hutchison's 1938 essay has been mainly interpreted as introducing positivism and ultra-empiricism into economics. Such interpretations misrepresent his position. While he clearly drew on logical positivism, his methodology stems from a more moderate form of empiricism. However the issue at stake is not the exact degree of Hutchison's empiricism, but rather the extent to which such negative labelling has trivialised his position and distracted attention from the main concern of his 1938 essay. This was to mount a sustained and systematic (...)
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  41. David M. Hart (2009). Forged Consensus: Science, Technology, and Economic Policy in the United States, 1921-1953. Princeton University Press.
    In this thought-provoking book, David Hart challenges the creation myth of post--World War II federal science and technology policy. According to this myth, the postwar policy sprang full-blown from the mind of Vannevar Bush in the form of Science, the Endless Frontier. Hart puts Bush's efforts in a larger historical and political context, demonstrating in the process that Bush was but one of many contributors to this complex policy and not necessarily the most successful one. Herbert Hoover, Karl Compton, Thurman (...)
     
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  42.  37
    Jeffery A. Thompson & David W. Hart (2006). Psychological Contracts: A Nano-Level Perspective on Social Contract Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):229 - 241.
    Social contract theory has been criticized as a “theory in search of application.” We argue that incorporating the nano, or individual, level of analysis into social contract inquiry will yield more descriptive theory. We draw upon the psychological contract perspective to address two critiques of social contract theory: its rigid macro-orientation and inattention to the process of contract formation. We demonstrate how a psychological contract approach offers practical insight into the impact of social contracting on day-to-day human interaction. We then (...)
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  43. Charles A. Hart (1946). From the Secretary's Desk. New Scholasticism 20 (2):176-178.
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  44.  16
    Yvonne Sherwood & Kevin Hart (eds.) (2005). Derrida and Religion: Other Testaments. Routledge.
    This book represents the most comprehensive attempt to date to explore and test Derrida's contribution and influence on the study of theology, biblical studies, and the philosophy of religion. Over the course of the last decade, the writings of Derrida and the key concepts that emerge from his work such as the gift, apocalypse, hospitality, and messianism have wrought far-reaching and irresistible changes in the way that scholars approach biblical texts, comparative religious studies, and religious violence, for instance, as well (...)
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  45. H. L. A. Hart (2008). Punishment and Responsibility: Essays in the Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This classic collection of essays, first published in 1968, represents H.L.A. Hart's landmark contribution to the philosophy of criminal responsibility and punishment. Unavailable for ten years, this new edition reproduces the original text, adding a new critical introduction by John Gardner, a leading contemporary criminal law theorist, discussing the continued influence of Hart's work on penal policy and the philosophy of criminal justice.
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  46. H. L. A. Hart (1958). Legal and Moral Obligation. In A. I. Melden (ed.), Essays in Moral Philosophy. University of Washington Press
     
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  47.  67
    John Hart (2014). Frank Knight's 'Categories' and the Definition of Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (3):290-307.
    In an attempt to combat the positivist view that the only legitimate way to conduct social science is in the manner of a natural science, Knight distinguished between positivist and non-positivist categories or levels of interpretation of human-social subject matter. Since each of the categories contained ‘a large element of truth’, Knight argued that any serious analysis would need to embrace a pluralist approach. In this paper I draw on four separate accounts he gave (in 1934, 1940, 1941, and 1942) (...)
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  48.  8
    John Hart (2002). A Conversation with Terence Hutchison. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (3):359-377.
    The pigeonholing of Hutchison's methodology as positivist, ultra-empiricist or Popperian has militated against a full appreciation of his more complex position. In this as-verbatim-as-possible account of an afternoon's discussion with Hutchison, it is the directly personal manner in which we gain insights, rather than simply the insights themselves, that we hope will help towards a re-assessment. We learn of his non-positivist view that economics is an empirical-historical discipline distinct from the natural sciences; and his rejection of Popper's view that prediction (...)
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  49. H. L. A. Hart (1959). The Presidential Address: Prolegomenon to the Principles of Punishment. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 60:1 - 26.
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  50.  6
    Susan M. Hart (2013). The Crash of Cougar Flight 491: A Case Study of Offshore Safety and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):519-541.
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