Search results for 'Harvey Gordon' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    E. Morreim, George Webb, Harvey Gordon, Baruch Brody, David Casarett, Ken Rosenfeld, James Sabin, John Lantos, Barry Morenz, Robert Krouse & Stan Goodman (2006). Innovation in Human Research Protection: The AbioCor Artificial Heart Trial. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):W6-W16.
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  2. Robert J. Gordon & Robert M. Solow (2003). Productivity Growth, Inflation, and Unemployment: The Collected Essays of Robert J. Gordon. Cambridge University Press.
    The seventeen seminal essays by Robert J. Gordon collected here, including three previously unpublished works, offer sharply etched views on the principal topics of macroeconomics - growth, inflation, and unemployment. The author re-examines their salient points in a uniquely creative, accessible introduction that serves on its own as an introduction to modern macroeconomics. Each of the four parts into which the essays are grouped also offers a new introduction. The papers in Part I explore different key aspects of the (...)
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  3. A. E. Harvey (1992). Book Review : The Morals of Jesus, by Nicholas Peter Harvey. London, Darton Longman and Todd, 1991. Xiii + 112 Pp. 6.95. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 5 (1):74-75.
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  4. Robert Gordon, Autism and the "Theory of Mind" Debate Robert M. Gordon and John A. Barker.
    With this understanding, children are better able to anticipate the behavior of others and to attune their own behavior accordingly. In mentally retarded children with Down's syndrome, attainment of such competence is delayed, but it is generally acquired by the time they reach the mental age of 4, as measured by tests of nonverbal intelligence. Thus from a developmental perspective, attainment of the mental age of 4 appears to be of profound significance for acquisition of what we shall call psychological (...)
     
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  5. Edwin Gordon (1997). Edwin Gordon Responds. Philosophy of Music Education Review 5 (1).
     
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  6.  75
    Robert M. Gordon (1992). The Simulation Theory: Objections and Misconceptions. Mind and Language 7 (1-2):11-34.
  7.  11
    David Harvey (2006). A Brief History of Neoliberalism. OUP Oxford.
    Writing for a wide audience, Harvey here tells the political-economic story of where neoliberalization came from and how it proliferated on the world stage. He constructs a framework, not only for analyzing the political and economic dangers that now surround us, but also for assessing the prospects for more socially just alternatives.
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  8.  70
    Robert M. Gordon (1987). The Structure of Emotions: Investigations in Cognitive Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Structure of Emotions argues that emotion concepts should have a much more important role in the social and behavioural sciences than they now enjoy, and shows that certain influential psychological theories of emotions overlook the explanatory power of our emotion concepts. Professor Gordon also outlines a new account of the nature of commonsense (or ‘folk’) psychology in general.
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  9.  46
    Lewis R. Gordon (2008). An Introduction to Africana Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this undergraduate textbook Lewis R. Gordon offers the first comprehensive treatment of Africana philosophy, beginning with the emergence of an Africana (i.e. African diasporic) consciousness in the Afro-Arabic world of the Middle Ages. He argues that much of modern thought emerged out of early conflicts between Islam and Christianity that culminated in the expulsion of the Moors from the Iberian Peninsula, and from the subsequent expansion of racism, enslavement, and colonialism which in their turn stimulated reflections on reason, (...)
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  10. Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits (2004). An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism, and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions. The book applies Buddhist (...)
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  11.  17
    Lewis R. Gordon (2000). Existentia Africana: Understanding Africana Existential Thought. Routledge.
    The intellectual history of the last quarter of this century has been marked by the growing influence of Africana thought--an area of philosophy that focuses on issues raised by the struggle over ideas in African cultures and their hybrid forms in Europe, the Americas, and the Caribbean. Existentia Africana is an engaging and highly readable introduction to the field of Africana philosophy and will help to define this rapidly growing field. Lewis R. Gordon clearly explains Africana existential thought to (...)
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  12.  10
    Mordechai Gordon (2010). Learning to Laugh at Ourselves: Humor, Self-Transcendence, and the Cultivation of Moral Virtues. Educational Theory 60 (6):735-749.
    In this essay Mordechai Gordon begins to address the neglect of humor among philosophers of education by focusing on some interesting connections between humor, self‐transcendence, and the development of moral virtues. More specifically, he explores the kind of humor that makes fun of oneself and how it can affect educational encounters. Gordon begins his analysis by discussing the nature and purpose of humor in general, while distinguishing it from laughter and amusement. In the next part of the essay, (...)
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  13. Peter Eli Gordon (2003). Rosenzweig and Heidegger Between Judaism and German Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Franz Rosenzweig is widely regarded today as one of the most original and intellectually challenging figures within the so-called renaissance of German-Jewish thought in the Weimar period. The architect of a unique kind of existential theology, and an important influence upon such philosophers as Walter Benjamin, Martin Buber, Leo Strauss, and Emmanuel Levinas, Rosenzweig is remembered chiefly as a "Jewish thinker," often to the neglect of his broader philosophical concerns. Cutting across the artificial divide that the traumatic memory of National (...)
     
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  14.  4
    Graham Harvey (2005). Animism: Respecting the Living World. Columbia University Press.
    How have human cultures engaged with and thought about animals, plants, rocks, clouds, and other elements in their natural surroundings? Do animals and other natural objects have a spirit or soul? What is their relationship to humans? In this new study, Graham Harvey explores current and past animistic beliefs and practices of Native Americans, Maori, Aboriginal Australians, and eco-pagans. He considers the varieties of animism found in these cultures as well as their shared desire to live respectfully within larger (...)
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  15. Jill Gordon (1999). Turning Toward Philosophy: Literary Device and Dramatic Structure in Plato's Dialogues. Penn State University Press.
    Acknowledging the powerful impact that Plato's dialogues have had on readers, Jill Gordon shows how the literary techniques Plato used function philosophically to engage readers in doing philosophy and attracting them toward the philosophical life. The picture of philosophical activity emerging from the dialogues, as thus interpreted, is a complex process involving vision, insight, and emotion basic to the human condition rather than a resort to pure reason as an escape from it. Since the literary features of Plato's writing (...)
     
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  16.  13
    Lewis Gordon (1995). Fanon and the Crisis of European Man: An Essay on Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Routledge.
    As the first book to analyze the work of Fanon as an existential-phenomenological of human sciences and liberation philosopher, Gordon deploys Fanon's work to illuminate how the "bad faith" of European science and civilization have philosophically stymied the project of liberation. Fanon's body of work serves as a critique of European science and society, and shows the ways in which the project of "truth" is compromised by Eurocentric artificially narrowed scope of humanity--a circumstance to which he refers as the (...)
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  17.  70
    Joy Gordon (1999). A Peaceful, Silent, Deadly Remedy: The Ethics of Economic Sanctions. Ethics and International Affairs 13 (1):123–142.
    Economic sanctions are emerging as one of the major tools of international governance in the post-Cold War era. Gordon considers the issue of sanctions within three ethical frameworks: just war doctrine, deontological ethics, and utilitarianism.
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  18.  5
    Charles W. Harvey (2010). Making Hollow Men. Educational Theory 60 (2):189-201.
    In this essay Charles Harvey offers a worried reflection on the range, extent, depth, affects, and effects of the perpetual assessment of the person in industrial nations in the contemporary world. Harvey begins his analysis by appealing to the work of Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, and Jean Baudrillard to provide an interpretive framework of our situation. He then focuses and concretizes these ideas through examples from his own life and, by extension, the readers. Finally, in light of Pierre (...)
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  19.  42
    Mordechai Gordon (2011). Listening as Embracing the Other: Martin Buber's Philosophy of Dialogue. Educational Theory 61 (2):207-219.
    In this essay, Mordechai Gordon interprets Martin Buber's ideas on dialogue, presence, and especially his notion of embracing in an attempt to shed some light on Buber's understanding of listening. Gordon argues that in order to understand Buber's conception of listening, one needs to examine this concept in the context of his philosophy of dialogue. More specifically, his contention is that closely examining Buber's notion of embracing the other is critical to making sense of his conception of listening. (...)
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  20.  9
    Peter Eli Gordon (2008). Heidegger and the Greeks: Interpretive Essays (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):178-179.
    Peter Eli Gordon - Heidegger and the Greeks: Interpretive Essays - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 46.1 178-179 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Peter E. Gordon Harvard University Drew A. Hyland and John Panteleimon Manoussakis, editors. Heidegger and the Greeks: Interpretive Essays. Bloomington-Indianapolis: University of Indiana Press, 2006. Pp. xiii + 194. Paper, $24.95. Heidegger's troubled and over-determined interest in Greek philosophy is well known. In the 1933 (...)
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  21.  12
    John Harvey (2006). The Burdens-Benefits Ratio Consideration for Medical Administration of Nutrition and Hydration to Persons in the Persistent Vegetative State. Christian Bioethics 12 (1):99-106.
    In this article, Harvey notes the initial confusion about the statement made by the pope concerning artificial nutrition and hydration on patients suffering persistent vegetative states (PVS) due to misunderstanding through the translation of the pope's words. He clarifies and assesses what was meant by the statement. He also discusses the problems of terminology concerned with the subject of PVS. Harvey concludes that the papal allocution was in line with traditional Catholic bioethics, and that while maintaining the life (...)
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  22.  26
    David Harvey (2008). Class, Crisis, and the City. Radical Philosophy Review 11 (2):151-158.
    The following interview was conducted on July 13, 2009 at the JFK Institute for Graduate Studies, Freie Universität in Berlin, shortly after a conference, entitled “Class in Crisis: Das Prekariat zwischen Krise und Bewegung,” at which Harvey delivered a keynote address. The conference, organized by the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, engaged the political, socio-economic, and conceptual dimensions of the so-called precariat class. The precariat (das Prekariat or la précarité) is typically defined by short-term employment, persistent marginalization, and social insecurity—something of (...)
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  23.  98
    Lewis R. Gordon (ed.) (1996). Existence in Black: An Anthology of Black Existential Philosophy. Routledge.
    Existence in Black is the first collective statement on the subject of Africana Philosophy of Existence. Drawing upon resources in Africana philosophy and literature, the contributors explore some of the central themes of Existentialism as posed by the context of what Frantz Fanon has identified as "the lived-experience of the black." Among questions posed and explored in the volume are: What is to be done in a world of near universal sense of superiority to, if not universal hatred of, black (...)
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  24.  3
    David Harvey & Giovanni Arrighi (2012). Les tortueux sentiers du capital. Revue Agone 49 (49):195-234.
    David Harvey : On peut difficilement imaginer vérification plus spectaculaire de ce que tu prédis depuis très longtemps dans tes théories que l’actuelle crise du système financier mondial. Y a-t-il des aspects de la crise qui t’ont surpris? Giovanni Arrighi : Ma prédiction était très simple. Dans The Long Twentieth Century, je qualifiais de crise annonciatrice d’un régime d’accumulation le début de la financiarisation et je faisais remarquer qu’après un certain temps – en général environ un demi-siècle – la (...)
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  25.  4
    Mordechai Gordon (2007). Living the Questions: Rilke's Challenge to Our Quest for Certainty. Educational Theory 57 (1):37-52.
    In this essay, Mordechai Gordon explores the significance of Rilke’s challenge to “live the questions” and embrace uncertainty with respect to the quest for certainty in education. The quest for certainty in education refers to our desire to gain a sense of psychological security and more control over a field that is fundamentally indeterminate. This quest implies an unwillingness to live with the inherent complexities and risks of education. After exploring the meaning and import of Rilke’s challenge and comparing (...)
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  26.  1
    David Harvey (2004). Réinventer la géographie. Actuel Marx 1 (1):15-39.
    Reinventing Geography. In this interview with the British journal New Left Review, David Harvey summarises the main stages of his trajectory, from his first works, which were positivistic in inspiration, to his conversion to Marxism and from his fieldwork to his theorisation of urban space, to his reflections on postmodernity and the transformation of contemporary capitalism, particularly in its global aspects. It is this latter perspective, analysed via the prism of imperialism, which is at the centre of Harvey’s (...)
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  27.  1
    David Harvey & Giovanni Arrighi (2012). Les tortueux sentiers du capital. Revue Agone 49 (49):195-234.
    David Harvey : On peut difficilement imaginer vérification plus spectaculaire de ce que tu prédis depuis très longtemps dans tes théories que l’actuelle crise du système financier mondial. Y a-t-il des aspects de la crise qui t’ont surpris? Giovanni Arrighi : Ma prédiction était très simple. Dans The Long Twentieth Century, je qualifiais de crise annonciatrice d’un régime d’accumulation le début de la financiarisation et je faisais remarquer qu’après un certain temps – en général environ un demi-siècle – la (...)
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  28. Lewis R. Gordon (2012). An Introduction to Africana Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this undergraduate textbook Lewis R. Gordon offers the first comprehensive treatment of Africana philosophy, beginning with the emergence of an Africana consciousness in the Afro-Arabic world of the Middle Ages. He argues that much of modern thought emerged out of early conflicts between Islam and Christianity that culminated in the expulsion of the Moors from the Iberian Peninsula, and from the subsequent expansion of racism, enslavement, and colonialism which in their turn stimulated reflections on reason, liberation, and the (...)
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  29.  1
    Rebecca Gordon (2014). Mainstreaming Torture: Ethical Approaches in the Post-9/11 United States. OUP Usa.
    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 reopened what many Americans had assumed was a settled ethical question: Is torture ever morally permissible? Rebecca Gordon argues that institutionalized state torture remains as wrong today as it was before those terrible attacks, and shows how U.S. practices during the ''war on terror'' are rooted in a history that includes support for torture regimes abroad and for the use of torture in the jails and prisons of this country.
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  30. Peter Eli Gordon (2003). Rosenzweig and Heidegger: Between Judaism and German Philosophy. University of California Press.
    Franz Rosenzweig is widely regarded today as one of the most original and intellectually challenging figures within the so-called renaissance of German-Jewish thought in the Weimar period. The architect of a unique kind of existential theology, and an important influence upon such philosophers as Walter Benjamin, Martin Buber, Leo Strauss, and Emmanuel Levinas, Rosenzweig is remembered chiefly as a "Jewish thinker," often to the neglect of his broader philosophical concerns. Cutting across the artificial divide that the traumatic memory of National (...)
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  31. Scott Paul Gordon (2002). The Power of the Passive Self in English Literature, 1640–1770. Cambridge University Press.
    Challenging recent work that contends that seventeenth-century English discourses privilege the notion of a self-enclosed, self-sufficient individual, The Power of the Passive Self in English Literature recovers a counter-tradition that imagines selves as more passively prompted than actively choosing. This tradition - which Scott Paul Gordon locates in seventeenth-century religious discourse, in early eighteenth-century moral philosophy, in mid eighteenth-century acting theory, and in the emergent novel - resists autonomy and defers agency from the individual to an external 'prompter'. (...) argues that the trope of passivity aims to guarantee a disinterested self in a culture that was increasingly convinced that every deliberate action involves calculating one's own interest. Gordon traces the origins of such ideas from their roots in the non-conformist religious tradition to their flowering in one of the central texts of eighteenth-century literature, Samuel Richardson's Clarissa. (shrink)
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  32. Joad Gordon (2008). Today & Tomorrow Volume 6 Child & Education: Autolycus, or the Future for Miscreant Youth Thrasymachus, the Future of Morals Romulus or the Future of the Child Procrustes, or the Future of English Education. Routledge.
    Autolycus or the Future for Miscreant Youth R G Gordon Originally published in 1928. "His clear and spirited presentation of the problem should rekindle interest in the subject and help towards legislation…" Times Educational Supplement Methods are outlined for dealing with the difficult problem of young offenders. The volume is aimed not only at teachers, doctors and social workers but also parents. 86pp ************** Thrasymachus or the Future of Morals C E M Joad Originally published in 1925. "…outspoken and (...)
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  33. John Harvey (2014). Clothes. Routledge.
    Clothes protect our vulnerable skin and they keep us warm or cool. They help us show that we are young or old, rich or poor, at work or play, and whether we may be good to know. But though they are basic, much as food and shelter are - and also may be beautiful - they have long had a bad press in serious, moral and philosophical writing. The main reason for this is that they are external to us, a (...)
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  34. John Harvey (2008). Clothes. Routledge.
    Clothes protect our vulnerable skin and they keep us warm or cool. They help us show that we are young or old, rich or poor, at work or play, and whether we may be good to know. But though they are basic, much as food and shelter are - and also may be beautiful - they have long had a bad press in serious, moral and philosophical writing. The main reason for this is that they are external to us, a (...)
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  35.  8
    David Harvey (2009). Cosmopolitanism and the Geographies of Freedom. Columbia University Press.
    Combining his passions for politics and geography, David Harvey charts a cosmopolitan order more appropriate to an emancipatory form of global governance.
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  36. Van A. Harvey (1997). Feuerbach and the Interpretation of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    Ludwig Feuerbach is traditionally regarded as a significant but transitional figure in the development of nineteenth-century German thought. Readings of Feuerbach's The Essence of Christianity tend to focus on those features which made it seem liberating to the Young Hegelians: namely, its criticism of reification as abstraction, and its interpretation of religion as alienation. In this book, Van Harvey claims that this is a limited and inadequate view of Feuerbach's work, especially of his critique of religion. The author argues (...)
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  37. Robert Harvey (2003). Global Disorder: America and the Threat of World Conflict. Carroll & Graf.
    In 1990, when the Berlin Wall fell and the Cold War ended, economic and political analysts declared the world a safer place. But not political journalist Robert Harvey. The roar of international optimism only intensified the pangs of his geopolitical anxiety. In 1995, in The Return of the Strong, he warned Western democracies that the tides of economic globalization were sweeping the world toward a new crisis. Unfortunately, the attack on the World Trade Center in New York City on (...)
     
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  38. John W. Harvey (2012). John Henry Muirhead (Routledge Revivals): Reflections. Routledge.
    First published in 1942, Reflections documents the life of John Henry Muirhead and the philosophical age that he observed. The first part of the volume derives from Muirhead’s own autobiographical narrative, left unfinished when he died in May 1940. The second part features two final chapters written by John W. Harvey that comprehensively record the final stages of Muirhead’s life. Harvey’s chapters incorporate Muirhead’s unfinished final years of commentary and begin at the man’s retirement from Birmingham Chair in (...)
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  39. John W. Harvey (2013). John Henry Muirhead : Reflections. Routledge.
    First published in 1942, _Reflections_ documents the life of John Henry Muirhead and the philosophical age that he observed. The first part of the volume derives from Muirhead’s own autobiographical narrative, left unfinished when he died in May 1940. The second part features two final chapters written by John W. Harvey that comprehensively record the final stages of Muirhead’s life. Harvey’s chapters incorporate Muirhead’s unfinished final years of commentary and begin at the man’s retirement from Birmingham Chair in (...)
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  40. John W. Harvey (2012). John Henry Muirhead : Reflections. Routledge.
    First published in 1942, _Reflections_ documents the life of John Henry Muirhead and the philosophical age that he observed. The first part of the volume derives from Muirhead’s own autobiographical narrative, left unfinished when he died in May 1940. The second part features two final chapters written by John W. Harvey that comprehensively record the final stages of Muirhead’s life. Harvey’s chapters incorporate Muirhead’s unfinished final years of commentary and begin at the man’s retirement from Birmingham Chair in (...)
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  41. John W. Harvey (2012). John Henry Muirhead : Reflections. Routledge.
    First published in 1942, _Reflections_ documents the life of John Henry Muirhead and the philosophical age that he observed. The first part of the volume derives from Muirhead’s own autobiographical narrative, left unfinished when he died in May 1940. The second part features two final chapters written by John W. Harvey that comprehensively record the final stages of Muirhead’s life. Harvey’s chapters incorporate Muirhead’s unfinished final years of commentary and begin at the man’s retirement from Birmingham Chair in (...)
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  42. Simon Harvey & Brian Masters (eds.) (2000). Voltaire: Treatise on Tolerance. Cambridge University Press.
    Voltaire is widely known as the author of a literary masterpiece, Candide, while his reputation as a thinker rests largely on his Philosophical Letters and Philosophical Dictionary. He is equally renowned as a critic of the forces of superstition and fanaticism, and a champion of freedom of thought and belief. The works presented here, in a new English translation, are among the most important and characteristic texts of the Enlightenment, and bring together all three aspects of Voltaire: the writer, the (...)
     
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  43. Todd Lowry & Robert P. Gordon (eds.) (1997). Ancient and Medieval Economic Ideas and Concepts of Social Justice. Brill.
    On March 17, 2015, Brill was informed that the article by Francisco Gómez Camacho S. J., “Later Scholastics: Spanish Economic Thought in the XVIth and XVIIth Centuries,” in _Ancient and Medieval Economic Ideas and Concepts of Social Justice_, ed. S. Todd Lowry and Barry Gordon, pp. 503–561 suffers from serious citation problems and that in some cases the original sources are never mentioned at all. It goes without saying that Brill strongly disapproves of such practices, which represent a serious (...)
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  44. Wanda Teays, John-Stewart Gordon & Alison Dundes Renteln (eds.) (2014). Global Bioethics and Human Rights: Contemporary Issues. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Editors Wanda Teays, John-Stewart Gordon, and Alison Dundes Renteln have assembled the works of an interdisciplinary, international team of experts in bioethics into a comprehensive, innovative and accessible book. Topics covered range from torture and lethal injection to euthanasia, sex selection, vulnerable human subjects, to health equity, safety and public health, and environmental disasters like Bhopal, Fukushima, and more.
     
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  45. Wanda Teays, John-Stewart Gordon & Alison Dundes Renteln (eds.) (2014). Global Bioethics and Human Rights: Contemporary Issues. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Editors Wanda Teays, John-Stewart Gordon, and Alison Dundes Renteln have assembled the works of an interdisciplinary, international team of experts in bioethics into a comprehensive, innovative and accessible book. Topics covered range from torture and lethal injection to euthanasia, sex selection, vulnerable human subjects, to health equity, safety and public health, and environmental disasters like Bhopal, Fukushima, and more.
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  46.  18
    J. Harvey (1979). Systematic Transposition of Colours. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 57 (September):211-19.
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  47. Alan Salter & Charles T. Wolfe (2009). “Empiricism Contra Experiment: Harvey, Locke and the Revisionist View of Experimental Philosophy”. Bulletin d'histoire et d'épistémologie des sciences de la vie 16 (2):113-140.
    In this paper we suggest a revisionist perspective on two significant figures in early modern life science and philosophy: William Harvey and John Locke. Harvey, the discoverer of the circulation of the blood, is often named as one of the rare representatives of the ‘life sciences’ who was a major figure in the Scientific Revolution. While this status itself is problematic, we would like to call attention to a different kind of problem: Harvey dislikes abstraction and controlled (...)
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  48.  40
    Harvey R. Brown & Christopher Gordon Timpson, Bell on Bell's Theorem: The Changing Face of Nonlocality.
    Between 1964 and 1990, the notion of nonlocality in Bell's papers underwent a profound change as his nonlocality theorem gradually became detached from quantum mechanics, and referred to wider probabilistic theories involving correlations between separated beables. The proposition that standard quantum mechanics is itself nonlocal became divorced from the Bell theorem per se from 1976 on, although this important point is widely overlooked in the literature. In 1990, the year of his death, Bell would express serious misgivings about the mathematical (...)
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  49. Alec Mchoul (2005). Aspects of Aspects: On Harvey Sacks's “Missing” Book, Aspects of the Sequential Organization of Conversation (1970). [REVIEW] Human Studies 28 (2):113 - 128.
    Conversation analysis (CA) is now what Kuhn once called a normal science. It has a discernible body of concepts, methods, and recognizable objects of analysis. More importantly, its considerable archive of accumulated findings has a very high degree of redundancy–in the positive sense that researchers have continually replicated the findings of their colleagues. It ought, then, in every respect, to be the envy of the social sciences generally and not easily dismissed as an abstruse and recondite branch of language studies (...)
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  50.  18
    Karl E. Peters (2013). A Christian Naturalism: Developing the Thinking of Gordon Kaufman. Zygon 48 (3):578-591.
    This essay develops a theological naturalism using Gordon Kaufman's nonpersonal idea of God as serendipitous creativity in contrast to the personal metaphorical theology of Sallie McFague. It then develops a Christian theological naturalism by using Kaufman's idea of historical trajectories, specifically Jesus trajectory1 and Jesus trajectory2. The first is the trajectory in the early Christian church assuming a personal God in the framework of Greek philosophy that results in the Trinity. The second is the naturalistic-humanistic trajectory of creativity (God) (...)
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