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Profile: Hasok Chang (Cambridge University)
  1. Hasok Chang (2013). Hasok Chang. 2012. Is Water H2O? Evidence, Realism and Pluralism. Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 28 (2):331-334.
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  2. Hasok Chang, Jeremiah James, Paul Needham, Kostas Gavroglu & Ana Simões (2013). Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Quantum Chemistry. Metascience 22 (3):523-544.
  3. Hasok Chang (2012). Acidity: The Persistence of the Everyday in the Scientific. Philosophy of Science 79 (5):690-700.
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  4. Hasok Chang (2012). 8 Incommensurability. In Vasō Kintē & Theodore Arabatzis (eds.), Kuhn's the Structure of Scientific Revolutions Revisited. Routledge. 153.
  5. Rachel Ankeny, Hasok Chang, Marcel Boumans & Mieke Boon (2011). Introduction: Philosophy of Science in Practice. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):303-307.
    Introduction: philosophy of science in practice Content Type Journal Article Category Editorial Article Pages 303-307 DOI 10.1007/s13194-011-0036-4 Authors Rachel Ankeny, School of History & Politics, University of Adelaide, Napier Building, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia Hasok Chang, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, Free School Lane, Cambridge, CB2 3RH UK Marcel Boumans, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65-67, 1018 XE Amsterdam, The Netherlands Mieke Boon, Department of Philosophy, University of (...)
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  6. Hasok Chang (2011). Compositionism as a Dominant Way of Knowing in Modern Chemistry. History of Science 49:247-268.
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  7. Hasok Chang (2011). The Philosophical Grammar of Scientific Practice. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (3):205 - 221.
    I seek to provide a systematic and comprehensive framework for the description and analysis of scientific practice?a philosophical grammar of scientific practice, ?grammar? as meant by the later Wittgenstein. I begin with the recognition that all scientific work, including pure theorizing, consists of actions, of the physical, mental, and ?paper-and-pencil? varieties. When we set out to see what it is that one actually does in scientific work, the following set of questions naturally emerge: who is doing what, why, and how? (...)
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  8. Hasok Chang (2011). The Persistence of Epistemic Objects Through Scientific Change. Erkenntnis 75 (3):413-429.
    Why do some epistemic objects persist despite undergoing serious changes, while others go extinct in similar situations? Scientists have often been careless in deciding which epistemic objects to retain and which ones to eliminate; historians and philosophers of science have been on the whole much too unreflective in accepting the scientists’ decisions in this regard. Through a re-examination of the history of oxygen and phlogiston, I will illustrate the benefits to be gained from challenging and disturbing the commonly accepted continuities (...)
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  9. Hasok Chang & Grant Fisher (2011). What the Ravens Really Teach Us : The Intrinsic Contextuality of Evidence. In Philip Dawid, William Twining & Mimi Vasilaki (eds.), Evidence, Inference and Enquiry. Oup/British Academy.
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  10. Hasok Chang, Operationalism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  11. Hasok Chang (2010). The Hidden History of Phlogiston: How Philosophical Failure Can Generate Historiographical Refinement. Hyle 16 (2):47 - 79.
    Historians often feel that standard philosophical doctrines about the nature and development of science are not adequate for representing the real history of science. However, when philosophers of science fail to make sense of certain historical events, it is also possible that there is something wrong with the standard historical descriptions of those events, precluding any sensible explanation. If so, philosophical failure can be useful as a guide for improving historiography, and this constitutes a significant mode of productive interaction between (...)
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  12. Hasok Chang, Alfred Nordmann, Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent & Jonathan Simon (2010). Ask Not What Philosophy Can Do for Chemistry, but What Chemistry Can Do for Philosophy. Metascience 19 (3):373-383.
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  13. Hasok Chang (2009). Ontological Principles and the Intelligibility of Epistemic Activities. In Henk De Regt, Sabina Leonelli & Kai Eigner (eds.), Scientific Understanding: Philosophical Perspectives. University of Pittsburgh Press. 64--82.
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  14. Hasok Chang (2008). Complementary Science. The Philosophers' Magazine 40 (40):17-24.
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  15. Hasok Chang (2008). Contingent Transcendental Arguments for Metaphysical Principles. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83 (63):113-133.
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  16. Hasok Chang, Beyond Case-Studies: History as Philosophy.
    What can we conclude from a mere handful of case studies? The field of HPS has witnessed too many hasty philosophical generalizations based on a small number of conveniently chosen case studies. One might even speculate that dissatisfaction with such methodological shoddiness contributed decisively to a widespread disillusionment with the whole HPS enterprise. Without specifying clear mechanisms for history-philosophy interaction, we are condemned to either making unwarranted generalizations from history, or writing entirely "local" histories with no bearing on an overall (...)
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  17. Hasok Chang (2007). Scientific Progress: Beyond Foundationalism and Coherentism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (61):1-20.
  18. Hasok Chang (2005). A Case for Old-Fashioned Observability, and a Reconstructed Constructive Empiricism. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):876-887.
    I develop a concept of observability that pertains to qualities rather than objects: a quality is observable if it can be registered by human sensation (possibly with the aid of instruments) without involving optional interpretations. This concept supports a better description of observations in science and everyday life than the object-based observability concepts presupposing causal information-transfer from the object to the observer. It also allows a rehabilitation of the traditional empiricist distinction between observations and their interpretations, but without a presumption (...)
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  19. Hasok Chang & Sabina Leonelli (2005). Infrared Metaphysics: Radiation and Theory-Choice. Part. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (4):687-706.
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  20. Hasok Chang & Sabina Leonelli (2005). Infrared Metaphysics: The Elusive Ontology of Radiation. Part 1. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (3):477-508.
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  21. Hasok Chang (2004). Inventing Temperature: Measurement and Scientific Progress. OUP USA.
    In Inventing Temperature, Chang takes a historical and philosophical approach to examine how scientists were able to use scientific method to test the reliability of thermometers; how they measured temperature beyond the reach of thermometers; and how they came to measure the reliability and accuracy of these instruments without a circular reliance on the instruments themselves. Chang discusses simple epistemic and technical questions about these instruments, which in turn lead to more complex issues about the solutions that were developed.
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  22. Hasok Chang (2003). Preservative Realism and its Discontents: Revisiting Caloric. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):902-912.
    A popular and plausible response against Laudan's “pessimistic induction” has been what I call “preservative realism,” which argues that there have actually been enough elements of scientific knowledge preserved through major theory‐change processes, and that those elements can be accepted realistically. This paper argues against preservative realism, in particular through a critical review of Psillos's argument concerning the case of the caloric theory of heat. Contrary to his argument, the historical record of the caloric theory reveals that beliefs about the (...)
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  23. Sandra D. Mitchell, Anjan Chakravartty, Ioannis Votsis, Timothy D. Lyons, Hasok Chang, P. Kyle Stanford, Justin Garson, Uljana Feest, Andrea Scarantino & Xiang Chen (2003). 1. Preface Preface (P. Vii). Philosophy of Science 70 (5).
     
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  24. Hasok Chang (2001). How to Take Realism Beyond Foot-Stamping. Philosophy 76 (1):5-30.
    I propose a reformulation of realism, as the pursuit of ontological plausibility in our systems of knowledge. This is dubbed plausibility realism, for convenience of reference. Plausibility realism is non-empiricist, in the sense that it uses ontological plausibility as an independent criterion from empirical adequacy in evaluating systems of knowledge. Ontological plausibility is conceived as a precondition for intelligibility, nor for Truth; therefore, the function of plausibilty realism is to facilitate the kind of understanding that is not reducible to mere (...)
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  25. Hasok Chang (1999). History and Philosophy of Science as a Continuation of Science by Other Means. Science and Education 8 (4):413-425.
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  26. Hasok Chang (1997). Can Planck's Constant Be Measured with Classical Mechanics? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (3):223 – 243.
    An interesting case of the complex interaction between theory and experiment can be found in many experiments in quantum physics employing classical reasoning. It is expected that this practice would lead to quantitative inaccuracy, unless the measurements' results were averaged. Whether or not this inaccuracy is significant depends critically on the details of the particular experimental situation. The example of Millikan's photoelectric experiment, in which he obtained a precise value of Planck's constant, provides a good case for illustrating the process (...)
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  27. Hasok Chang (1997). On the Applicability of the Quantum Measurement Formalism. Erkenntnis 46 (2):143-163.
    Customary discussions of quantum measurements are unrealistic, in the sense that they do not reflect what happens in most actual measurements even under ideal circumstances. Even theories of measurement which discard the projection postulate tend to retain two unrealistic assumptions of the von Neumann theory: that a measurement consists of a single physical interaction, and that the topic of every measurement is information wholly contained in the quantum state of the object of measurement. I suggest that these unrealistic assumptions originate (...)
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  28. Hasok Chang (1995). Circularity and Reliability in Measurement. Perspectives on Science 3:153-172.
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  29. Hasok Chang (1995). The Quantum Counter-Revolution: Internal Conflicts in Scientific Change. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 26 (2):121-136.
  30. Hasok Chang (1993). A Misunderstood Rebellion. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (5):741-790.
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  31. Hasok Chang & Nancy Cartwright (1993). Causality and Realism in the EPR Experiment. Erkenntnis 38 (2):169 - 190.
    We argue against the common view that it is impossible to give a causal account of the distant correlations that are revealed in EPR-type experiments. We take a realistic attitude about quantum mechanics which implies a willingness to modify our familiar concepts according to its teachings. We object to the argument that the violation of factorizability in EPR rules out causal accounts, since such an argument is at best based on the desire to retain a classical description of nature that (...)
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