Search results for 'Hastings Berkeley' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Hastings Berkeley (1912). The Kernel of Pragmatism. Mind 21 (81):84-88.
  2. Hastings Berkeley (1911). Mysticism in Modern Mathematics. Mind 20 (77):88-97.
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  3. George Berkeley (1820). The Works of George Berkeley, D.D. Late Bishop of Cloyne in Ireland to Which is Added an Account of His Life ; and Several of His Letters to Thomas Prior, Dean Gervais, Mr. Pope &C. [REVIEW] Richard Priestley.
     
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  4. George Berkeley, Joseph Stock, Thomas Tegg & Curson (1837). The Works of George Berkeley, D.D. Bishop of Cloyne. To Which Are Added, an Account of His Life, and Several of His Letters to Thomas Prior, Esq. Dean Gervais, Mr. Pope, &C. In One Volume. [REVIEW] Printed for Thomas Tegg and Son, ... R. Griffin and Co., Glasgow; Tegg and Co., Dublin; Also J. And S.A. Tegg, Sydney and Hobart Town.
     
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  5. George Berkeley & Alexander Campbell Fraser (1871). The Works of George Berkeley, D.D., Formerly Bishop of Cloyne, Including Many of His Writings Hitherto Unpublished. Clarendon Press.
     
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  6. Alexander Campbell Fraser & George Berkeley (1871). Life and Letters of George Berkeley, D.D. Formerly Bishop of Cloyne and an Account of His Philosophy. With Many Writings of Bishop Berkeley Hitherto Unpublished: Metaphysical, Descriptive, Theological. Clarendon Press.
     
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  7. Alexander Campbell Fraser & George Berkeley (1988). Life and Letters of George Berkeley with Many Writings of Bishop Berkeley Hitherto Unpublished--Metaphysical, Descriptive, Theological.
     
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  8. Henrietta Hobart Howard Suffolk, John Wilson Croker & George Berkeley (1824). Letters to and From Henrietta, Countess of Suffolk, and Her Second Husband, the Hon. George Berkeley; From 1712 to 1767. J. Murray.
     
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  9. George Berkeley, Tyron Goldschmidt & Scott Stapleford (2016). Berkeley’s Principles: Expanded and Explained. Routledge.
    Berkeley's Principles: Expanded and Explained includes the entire classical text of the Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge in bold font, a running commentary blended seamlessly into the text in regular font and analytic summaries of each section. The commentary is like a professor on hand to guide the reader through every line of the daunting prose and every move in the intricate argumentation. The unique design helps students learn how to read and engage with one of modern (...)
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  10. George Berkeley (1965). Berkeley's Philosophical Writings. New York, Collier Books.
     
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  11.  8
    George Berkeley (1901). The Works of George Berkeley. Continuum.
  12.  14
    Geneviève Brykman & George Berkeley (1973). Berkeley et le désir de voir. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 163:205 - 213.
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  13.  41
    George Berkeley, Correspondence: Berkeley and Samuel Johnson.
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  14.  5
    Geneviève Brykman & George Berkeley (1980). Berkeley et l'intérieur absolu Des choses. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 170 (4):421 - 432.
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  15. George Berkeley & Alexander Campbell Fraser (1901). The Works of George Berkeley, D.D., Formerly Bishop of Cloyne. Clarendon Press.
     
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  16. George Berkeley (1871). The Works of George Berkeley, D.D. Macmillan.
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  17. George Berkeley (2009). Berkeley's Alciphron: English Text and Essays in Interpretation. Olms.
     
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  18. George Berkeley & Benjamin Rand (1914). Berkeley and Percival, by B. Rand. The Correspondence of George Berkeley ... And Sir John Percival.
     
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  19. George Berkeley (1930). Berkeley's Commonplace Book. London, Faber & Faber.
     
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  20. George Berkeley (1987). George Berkeley's Manuscript Introduction. Doxa.
     
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  21. George Berkeley & Bertil Belfrage (1987). George Berkeley's Manuscript Introduction an Editio Diplomatica. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  22. George Berkeley (1899). Selections From Berkeley, Annotated. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
  23. George Berkeley, David Hume & John Locke (1961). The Empiricists John Locke, an Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Abridged by Richard Taylor; George Berkeley, a Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge [and] Three Dialogues ... David Hume, an Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding [and] Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. --. [REVIEW] Doubleday.
  24. George Berkeley, Désirée Park & British Library (1984). The Notebooks of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne.
     
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  25. George Berkeley & Collyns Simon (1878). The Principles of Human Knowledge Being Berkeley's Celebrated Treatise on the Nature of Material Substance. Wm. Tegg.
  26. George Berkeley & Henry von-der-Heyde Cowell (1860). The Theory of Vision, or Visual Language, Shewing the Immediate Presence and Providence of a Deity, Vindicated and Explained, by the Author of Alciphron. By G. Berkeley, Ed. By H.V.H. Cowell. [REVIEW]
     
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  27. George Berkeley & G. N. Wright (1843). The Works of George Berkeley Including His Letters to Thomas Prior, Esq., Dean Gervais, Mr. Pope, &C. &C. To Which is Prefixed an Account of His Life. In This Edition the Latin Essays Are Rendered Into English, and the "Introduction to Human Knowledge" Annotated. [REVIEW] T. Tegg.
     
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  28. George Berkeley & Sampson (1897). The Works of George Berkeley, D.D., Bishop of Cloyne. George Bell.
     
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  29. George Berkeley, Joseph Stock & G. N. Wright (1843). The Works of George Berkeley, D.D., Bishop of Cloyne Including His Letters to Thomas Prior, Dean Gervais, Mr. Pope, Etc. : To Which is Prefixed an Account of His Life. [REVIEW] Printed for T. Tegg.
     
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  30. George Berkeley (1837). The Works of George Berkeley.. To Which Are Added, an Account of His Life, and Several of His Letters to Thomas Prior, Esq., Dean Gervais, Mr. Pope, &C. --. [REVIEW] Printed for Thomas Tegg & Son.
     
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  31. George Berkeley & T. E. Jessop (1951). The Works of George Berkeley. Vol. III. Philosophy 26 (97):185-185.
     
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  32. George Berkeley & Sampson (1897). The Works of George Berkeley, Ed. By G. Sampson.
     
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  33. George Berkeley, Th E. Jessop & Mariapaola Fimiani (1981). Viaggio in Italia, Berkeley in Italia. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 171 (3):364-365.
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  34. David Hume, George Berkeley & John Locke (1910). English Philosophers of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Locke, Berkeley, Hume, with Introductions and Notes. P. F. Collier.
  35. John Locke, George Berkeley & David Hume (1910). English Philosophers of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Locke, Berkeley, Hume. P.F. Collier.
  36. A. A. Luce & George Berkeley (1952). The Works of George Berkeley. Vol. IV. Philosophy 27 (101):171-171.
     
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  37. A. A. Luce, T. E. Jessop & George Berkeley (1957). The Works of George Berkeley Bishop of Cloyne. Volume 7. Philosophy 32 (120):92-92.
     
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  38. P. E. B. Jourdain (1911). BERKELEY, HASTINGS. - Mysticism in Modern Mathematics. [REVIEW] Mind 20:88.
     
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  39.  94
    Stephen H. Daniel (2015). Berkeley, Hobbes, and the Constitution of the Self. In Sébastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 69-81.
    By focusing on the exchange between Descartes and Hobbes on how the self is related to its activities, Berkeley draws attention to how he and Hobbes explain the forensic constitution of human subjectivity and moral/political responsibility in terms of passive obedience and conscientious submission to the laws of the sovereign. Formulated as the language of nature or as pronouncements of the supreme political power, those laws identify moral obligations by locating political subjects within those networks of sensible signs. When (...)
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  40.  55
    Stephen H. Daniel (2011). Stoicism in Berkeley's Philosophy. In Bertil Belfrage & Timo Airaksinen (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars 121-34.
    Commentators have not said much regarding Berkeley and Stoicism. Even when they do, they generally limit their remarks to Berkeley’s Siris (1744) where he invokes characteristically Stoic themes about the World Soul, “seminal reasons,” and the animating fire of the universe. The Stoic heritage of other Berkeleian doctrines (e.g., about mind or the semiotic character of nature) is seldom recognized, and when it is, little is made of it in explaining his other doctrines (e.g., immaterialism). None of this (...)
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  41.  49
    Stephen H. Daniel (2013). How Berkeley Redefines Substance. Berkeley Studies 24:40-50.
    In several essays I have argued that Berkeley maintains the same basic notion of spiritual substance throughout his life. Because that notion is not the traditional (Aristotelian, Cartesian, or Lockean) doctrine of substance, critics (e.g., John Roberts, Tom Stoneham, Talia Mae Bettcher, Margaret Atherton, Walter Ott, Marc Hight) claim that on my reading Berkeley either endorses a Humean notion of substance or has no recognizable theory of substance at all. In this essay I point out how my interpretation (...)
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  42. Stephen H. Daniel (2008). Berkeley's Stoic Notion of Spiritual Substance. In New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books
    For Berkeley, minds are not Cartesian spiritual substances because they cannot be said to exist (even if only conceptually) abstracted from their activities. Similarly, Berkeley's notion of mind differs from Locke's in that, for Berkeley, minds are not abstract substrata in which ideas inhere. Instead, Berkeley redefines what it means for the mind to be a substance in a way consistent with the Stoic logic of 17th century Ramists on which Leibniz and Jonathan Edwards draw. This (...)
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  43.  30
    Stephen H. Daniel (2004). Les limites de la philosophie naturelle de Berkeley. In Sébastien Charles (ed.), Science et épistémologie selon Berkeley. Presses de L’Université Laval 163-70.
    (Original French text followed by English version.) For Berkeley, mathematical and scientific issues and concepts are always conditioned by epistemological, metaphysical, and theological considerations. For Berkeley to think of any thing--whether it be a geometrical figure or a visible or tangible object--is to think of it in terms of how its limits make it intelligible. Especially in De Motu, he highlights the ways in which limit concepts (e.g., cause) mark the boundaries of science, metaphysics, theology, and morality.
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  44.  4
    Stefan Storrie (2011). Anne Berkeley’s Contrast: A Note. Berkeley Studies 22:9-14.
    This essay provides some historical background for, and considers the philosophical importance of, the collection of Anne Berkeley’s letters to Adam Gordon. The primary philosophical significance of the letters is her arguments against the so-called “free thinkers.” She discusses the philosophical view and the behavior of five prominent free-thinkers: Shaftesbury, Bolingbroke, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Hume. Her discussion of Shaftesbury is particularly illuminating and can be read as a commentary on Alciphron III.13-14. Because the work of the other four were (...)
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  45. Alan Schwerin (2015). On Hume's Defense of Berkeley. Open Journal of Philosophy 5 (6):327 - 337.
    In 1739 Hume bequeathed a bold view of the self to the philosophical community that would prove highly influential, but equally controversial. His bundle theory of the self elicited substantial opposition soon after its appearance in the Treatise of Human Nature. Yet Hume makes it clear to his readers that his views on the self rest on respectable foundations: namely, the views of the highly regarded Irish philosopher, George Berkeley. As the author of the Treatise sees it, his account (...)
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  46.  74
    Gary Hatfield (2011). Transparency of Mind: The Contributions of Descartes, Leibniz, and Berkeley to the Genesis of the Modern Subject. In Hubertus Busche (ed.), Departure for Modern Europe: A Handbook of Early Modern Philosophy (1400-1700). Felix Meiner Verlag 361–375.
    The chapter focuses on attributions of the transparency of thought to early modern figures, most notably Descartes. Many recent philosophers assume that Descartes believed the mind to be “transparent”: since all mental states are conscious, we are therefore aware of them all, and indeed incorrigibly know them all. Descartes, and Berkeley too, do make statements that seem to endorse both aspects of the transparency theses (awareness of all mental states; incorrigibility). However, they also make systematic theoretical statements that directly (...)
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  47. Anthony Skelton (2013). Rashdall, Hastings. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
    An opinionated encyclopedia entry on Hastings Rashdall, in which several worries about his case for ideal utilitarianism are raised.
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  48. John Russell Roberts, Innate Ideas Without Abstract Ideas: An Essay on Berkeley's Platonism.
    Draft. Berkeley denied the existence of abstract ideas and any faculty of abstraction. At the same time, however, he embraced innate ideas and a faculty of pure intellect. This paper attempts to reconcile the tension between these commitments by offering an interpretation of Berkeley's Platonism.
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  49. Kenneth P. Winkler (1994). Berkeley: An Interpretation. Oxford University Press Uk.
    David Hume wrote that Berkeley's arguments `admit of no answer but produce no conviction'. This book aims at the kind of understanding of Berkeley's philosophy that comes from seeing how we ourselves might be brought to embrace it. Berkeley held that matter does not exist, and that the sensations we take to be caused by an indifferent and independent world are instead caused directly by God. Nature becomes a text, with no existence apart from the spirits who (...)
     
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  50. John T. Sanders, From Perception to Metaphysics: Reflections on Berkeley and Merleau-Ponty.
    George Berkeley's apparently strange view – that nothing exists without a mind except for minds themselves – is notorious. Also well known, and equally perplexing at a superficial level, is his insistence that his doctrine is no more than what is consistent with common sense. It was every bit as crucial for Berkeley that it be demonstrated that the colors are really in the tulip, as that there is nothing that is neither a mind nor something perceived by (...)
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