Search results for 'Hauke Reuter' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  24
    Broder Breckling & Hauke Reuter (2004). Analysing Biodiversity: The Necessity of Interdisciplinary Trends in the Development of Ecological Theory. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):83-105.
    Technological advancement has an ambivalent character concerning the impact on biodiversity. It accounts for major detrimental environmental impacts and aggravates threads to biodiversity. On the other hand, from an application perspective of environmental science, there are technical advancements, which increase the potential of analysis, detection and monitoring of environmental changes and open a wider spectrum of sustainable use strategies.The concept of biodiversity emerged in the last two decades as a political issue to protect the structural and functional basis of earthbound (...)
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  2.  8
    Christopher Hauke (2005). Human Being Human: Culture and the Soul. Routledge.
    Human Being Human explores the classical question What is a human being? and produces original and challenging insights in the process of providing an answer. In examining our human being, Christopher Hauke challenges the notion of human nature, questions the assumed superiority of human consciousness and rational thinking and pays close attention to the contradiction of living simultaneously as an autonomous individual and a member of the collective community. The main chapters include: Whose in Charge Here? Knowledge, Power and (...)
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  3.  34
    Christopher Hauke (2000). Jung and the Postmodern: The Interpretation of Realities. Routledge.
    The psychological writing of Jung and the post-Jungians is all too often ignored as anachronistic, archaic and mystic. In Jung and the Postmodern, Christopher Hauke challenges this, arguing that Jungian psychology is more relevant now than ever before - not only can it be a response to modernity, but it can offer a critique of modernity and Enlightenment values which brings it in line with the postmodern critique of contemporary culture. After introducing Jungians to postmodern themes in Jameson, Baudrillard, (...)
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  4. Christopher Hauke (2013). Visible Mind: Movies, Modernity and the Unconscious. Routledge.
    _Why is the moving image so important in our lives? What is the link between the psychology of Jung, Freud and films? How do film and psychology address the problems of modernity? _ _Visible Mind_ is a book about why film is so important to contemporary life, how film affects us psychologically as individuals, and how it affects us culturally as collective social beings. Since its inception, film has been both responsive to historical cultural conditions and reflective of changes in (...)
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  5.  44
    Eddy Nahmias, Jason Shepard & Shane Reuter (2014). It’s OK If ‘My Brain Made Me Do It’: People’s Intuitions About Free Will and Neuroscientific Prediction. Cognition 133 (2):502-516.
    In recent years, a number of prominent scientists have argued that free will is an illusion, appealing to evidence demonstrating that information about brain activity can be used to predict behavior before people are aware of having made a decision. These scientists claim that the possibility of perfect prediction based on neural information challenges the ordinary understanding of free will. In this paper we provide evidence suggesting that most people do not view the possibility of neuro-prediction as a threat to (...)
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  6.  10
    Hyo-eun Kim, Nina Poth, Kevin Reuter & Justin Sytsma, Where is Your Pain? A Cross-Cultural Comparison of the Concept of Pain in Americans and South Korea.
    Philosophical orthodoxy holds that pains are mental states, taking this to reflect the ordinary conception of pain. Despite this, evidence is mounting that English speakers do not tend to conceptualize pains in this way; rather, they tend to treat pains as being bodily states. We hypothesize that this is driven by two primary factors—the phenomenology of feeling pains and the surface grammar of pain reports. There is reason to expect that neither of these factors is culturally specific, however, and thus (...)
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  7.  9
    Martina Reuter (2014). “Like a Fanciful Kind of Half Being”: Mary Wollstonecraft's Criticism of Jean‐Jacques Rousseau. Hypatia 29 (4):925-941.
    The article investigates the philosophical foundations and details of Mary Wollstonecraft's criticism of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on the education and nature of women. I argue that Wollstonecraft's criticism must not be understood as a constructionist critique of biological reductionism. The first section analyzes the differences between Wollstonecraft's and Rousseau's views on the possibility of a true civilization and shows how these differences connect to their respective conceptions of moral psychology. The section shows that Wollstonecraft's disagreement with Rousseau's views on (...)
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  8.  50
    Kevin Reuter, Lara Kirfel, Raphael van Riel & Luca Barlassina (2014). The Good, the Bad, and the Timely: How Temporal Order and Moral Judgment Influence Causal Selection. Frontiers in Psychology 5:1-10.
    Causal selection is the cognitive process through which one or more elements in a complex causal structure are singled out as actual causes of a certain effect. In this paper, we report on an experiment in which we investigated the role of moral and temporal factors in causal selection. Our results are as follows. First, when presented with a temporal chain in which two human agents perform the same action one after the other, subjects tend to judge the later agent (...)
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  9.  32
    Jonathan M. Weinberg, Joshua Alexander, Chad Gonnerman & Shane Reuter (2013). Restrictionism and Reflection. The Monist 95 (2):200-222.
    It has become increasingly popular to respond to experimental philosophy by suggesting that experimental philosophers haven’t been studying the right kind of thing. One version of this kind of response, which we call the reflection defense, involves suggesting both that philosophers are interested only in intuitions that are the product of careful reflection on the details of hypothetical cases and the key concepts involved in those cases, and that these kinds of philosophical intuitions haven’t yet been adequately studied by experimental (...)
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  10.  39
    Jason Shepard & Shane Reuter (2012). Neuroscience, Choice, and the Free Will Debate. American Journal of Bioethics - Neuroscience 3 (3):7-11.
    A number of scientists have recently argued that neuroscience provides strong evidence against the requirements of the folk notion of free will. In one such line of argumentation, it is claimed that choice is required for free will, and neuroscience is showing that people do not make choices. In this article, we argue that this no-choice line of argumentation relies on a specific conception of choice. We then provide evidence that people do not share the conception of choice required of (...)
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  11.  80
    Kevin Reuter (2011). Distinguishing the Appearance From the Reality of Pain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):94-109.
    It is often held that it is conceptually impossible to distinguish between a pain and a pain experience. In this article I present an argument which concludes that people make this distinction. I have done a web-based statistical analysis which is at the core of this argument. It shows that the intensity of pain has a decisive effect on whether people say that they 'feel a pain'(lower intensities) or 'have a pain' (greater intensities). This 'intensity effect'can be best explained by (...)
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  12. M. Reuter (1999). Merleau-Ponty's Notion of Pre-Reflective Intentionality. Synthese 118 (1):69--88.
    This article presents an interpretation of Merleau-Ponty's notion of pre-reflective intentionality, explicating the similarities and differences between his and Husserl's understandings of intentionality. The main difference is located in Merleau-Ponty's critique of Husserl's noesis-noema structure. Merleau-Ponty seems to claim that there can be intentional acts which are not of or about anything specific. He defines intentionality by its ``directedness'', which is described as a bodily, concrete spatial motility. Merleau-Ponty's understanding of intentionality is part of his attempt to rewrite the relation (...)
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  13.  11
    Kevin Reuter, Phillips Dustin & Justin Sytsma, Hallucinating Pain.
    The standard interpretation of quantum mechanics and a standard interpretation of the awareness of pain have a common feature: Both postulate the existence of an irresolvable duality. Whereas many physicists claim that all particles exhibit particle and wave properties, many philosophers working on pain argue that our awareness of pain is paradoxical, exhibiting both perceptual and introspective characteristics. In this chapter, we offer a pessimistic take on the putative paradox of pain. Specifically, we attempt to resolve the supposed paradox by (...)
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  14.  71
    Kevin Reuter (2010). Is Imagination Introspective? Philosophia 39 (1):31-38.
    The literature suggests that in sensory imagination we focus on the imagined objects, not on the imaginative states themselves, and that therefore imagination is not introspective. It is claimed that the introspection of imaginative states is an additional cognitive ability. However, there seem to be counterexamples to this claim. In many cases in which we sensorily imagine a certain object in front of us, we are aware that this object is not really where we imagine it to be. So it (...)
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  15.  11
    Martina Reuter (2004). The Body at Century's End. Hypatia 19 (2):160-169.
  16.  4
    Robert Reuter (1992). Truth and the End of Inquiry. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 20 (62):12-14.
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  17.  24
    Mark Reuter (1998). Language, Lies, and Human Action in William of Ockham's Treatment of Insolubles. Vivarium 36 (1):108-133.
  18.  7
    Christopher Hauke (2006). The Unconscious: Personal and Collective. In Renos K. Papadopoulos (ed.), The Handbook of Jungian Psychology: Theory, Practice and Applications. Routledge 54.
  19.  23
    Lars Reuter (2000). Human is What is Born of a Human: Personhood, Rationality, and an European Convention. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):181 – 194.
    In the course of its preparation, the 1997 convention on human rights and biomedicine adopted by the Council of Europe instigated a widespread debate. This article examines one of the core issues: the notion of the human being as depicted in the convention. It is argued that according to the convention, this being may exist in three different legal categories, namely 'human life', 'embryo', and 'personhood', each furnished with an inherent set of somewhat different rights, yet none of them clearly (...)
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  20.  1
    P. D. Jasper Liptow & P. D. Gerson Reuter (2015). Eine kurze Verteidigung philosophischer Erklärungen. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 63 (3).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie Jahrgang: 63 Heft: 3 Seiten: 584-589.
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  21.  5
    Martina Reuter, Lena Halldenius & Alan Coffee (2014). Cluster Introduction: Mary Wollstonecraft: Philosophy and Enlightenment. Hypatia 29 (4):906-907.
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  22.  5
    Sören Reuter (2004). Reiz – Bild – Unbewusste Anschauung. Nietzsche-Studien 33 (1):351-372.
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  23.  1
    Sören Reuter (2015). Sinn Und Sinnlosigkeit. Rezension Zu: Eike Brock. Nietzsche Und der Nihilismus. Nietzscheforschung 22 (1).
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  24.  5
    Gerson Reuter (2013). Musik ohne musikalische Gehalte–Warum auch nicht? Zeitschrift für Ästhetik Und Allgemeine Kunstwissenschaft 58 (2):247-271.
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  25.  4
    Joel S. Weissman, Darrell J. Gaskin & James Reuter (2003). Hospitals' Care of Uninsured Patients During the 1990s: The Relation of Teaching Status and Managed Care to Changes in Market Share and Market Concentration. Inquiry 40 (1):84-93.
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  26.  2
    Robert Reuter (1999). Evolution's Hand. Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):432-434.
  27.  1
    Sören Reuter (2014). Philosophie als Ausdruck des Persönlichen: Zum Zusammenhang zwischen Wissenschaft, Kunst und Erkenntnis bei Nietzsche. In Claudia Terne & Steffen Dietzsch (eds.), Nietzsches Perspektiven: Denken Und Dichten in der Moderne. De Gruyter 85-132.
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  28. Georges Perilleux & Hedwig Reuter (1999). Communication interculturelles et traduction littèraire: observations thèoriques et èpistèmologiques. Cahiers Internationaux de Symbolisme 92:119-130.
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  29.  4
    Magdalena Reuter & Wioletta Dziarnowska (2012). Kognitywistyczne ujęcia konfabulacji: podejście pamięciowe vs. epistemiczne. Studia Z Kognitywistyki I Filozofii Umysłu 6.
    Konfabulacja to błędnie ugruntowane przekonanie, które jest skutkiem wypełniania luk w systemie poznawczym. Konfabulację należy odróżnić od kłamstwa, gdyż osoby konfabulujące nie mają intencji oszukania odbiorcy. Wyróżniam konfabulacje patologiczne oraz konfabulacje normalne. Przedstawiam dwa podejścia do problematyki konfabulacji: podejście pamięciowe i epistemiczne. Wedle tego pierwszego, wąskiego podejścia, konfabulacje są wynikiem uzupełniania luk w systemie pamięci. Zgodnie z drugim, szerszym podejściem, konfabulacje mogą być związane także z innymi domenami wiedzy, takimi jak np. percepcja wzrokowa czy percepcja ciała. W artykule proponuję, by (...)
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  30.  6
    Robert Reuter (1994). Peirce and Testing the God-Hypothesis. Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):289-302.
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  31.  1
    Hans B. Gute & K. K. Reuter (1990). The Last Word on Elimination of Quantifiers in Modules. Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (2):670-673.
  32.  6
    Martina Reuter (2004). Book Review: Barbara Brook. The Body at Century's End: A Review of Feminist Perspectives on the Body London and New York: Longman, 1999; Gail Weiss and Honi Fern Haber. Perspectives on Embodiment: The Intersection of Nature and Culture and Jane Arthurs and Jean Grimshaw. Women's Bodies: Discipline and Transgression. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (2):160-169.
  33.  5
    Robert Reuter (1993). The Radical Agent: A Deweyan Theory of Causation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 29 (2):239 - 257.
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  34.  3
    Robert Reuter (1994). Charles Peirce's Evolutionary Philosophy. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 22 (69):7-8.
  35.  1
    Sören Reuter (2013). Im Wirbel der Metaphysik – Und Kein Ende in Sicht. Nietzscheforschung 20 (1).
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  36.  1
    Helen Hodges, Iris Reuter & Helen Pilcher (2004). I2 Prospects and Perils of Stem Cell Repair of the Central Nervous System: A Brief Guide to Current Science. In D. Rees & Steven P. R. Rose (eds.), The New Brain Sciences: Perils and Prospects. Cambridge University Press 195.
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  37.  2
    Lars Reuter (2005). The Saving Power of Biotechnology. Ethical Perspectives 12 (1):3-16.
    Biotechnology emerges in the nexus of academic, political and economic interests. With its strong reliance on a human individual capable of changing matter or organisms in accordance with anticipated goals, biotechnology is closely linked with a modern notion of human agency.In this article, it is argued that in contemporary European societies, biotechnology is perceived in three distinct ways, namely as an agent, as pluripotent, and as salvific. Similar to other forms of technologies, it provides a foil for human activity and (...)
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  38.  1
    Ralph R. Reuter (1951). Book Review:Practical Ethics: A Sketch for the Moral Structure of Society. Mary Sturt, Margaret Hobling. [REVIEW] Ethics 61 (4):326-.
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  39. Erica Cosentino, Markus Werning & Kevin Reuter (2015). Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
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  40. Erica Cosentino, Markus Werning & Kevin Reuter (2015). Reading Words Hurts: The Impact of Pain Sensitivity on People’s Ratings of Pain-Related Words. In Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
  41. Walter Demel, Nicolai Dose, Rainer S. Elkar, Dietrich Fürst, Axel Görlitz, Priv-Doz Dr Stefan Machura, Peter Nahamowitz, Peter Nitschke, Lutz R. Reuter & Emanuel Richter (2006). Verzeichnis der Autoren. In Ralf Walkenhaus & Rüdiger Voigt (eds.), Philosophia Naturalis. Franz Steiner 185-185.
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  42. Jim Dow & Laurel Reuter (2007). Marking the Land: Jim Dow in North Dakota. Center for American Places.
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  43. Christopher Hauke & Luke Hockley (eds.) (2011). Jung and Film Ii: The Return: Further Post-Jungian Takes on the Moving Image. Routledge.
    Since _Jung and Film_ was first published in 2001, Jungian writing on the moving image in film and television has accelerated. _Jung and Film II: The Return_ provides new contributions from authors across the globe willing to tackle the broader issues of film production and consumption, the audience and the place of film culture in our lives. As well as chapters dealing with particular film makers such as Maya Derren and films such as _Birth, The Piano, The Wrestler _and _Breaking (...)
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  44. Furstenwerth Hauke (2003). On Morality and Chemistry. Poiesis and Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science 2 (1).
     
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  45. Brunkhorst Hauke & Krockenberger Peter (1998). Paradigm-Core and Theory-Dynamics in Critical Social Theory: People and Programs. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (6).
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  46. Sara Heinämaa & Martina Reuter (eds.) (2009). Psychology and Philosophy : Inquiries Into the Soul From Late Scholasticism to Contemporary Thought. Springer.
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  47. Sara Heinämaa, Martina Reuter & Mikko Yrjönsuuri (eds.) (2003). Spiritus animalis: kirjoituksia filosofian historiasta. Gaudeamus.
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  48. Martina Reuter (2004). Book Review: Barbara Brook. The Body at Century's End: A Review of Feminist Perspectives on the Body London and New York: Longman, 1999; Gail Weiss and Honi Fern Haber. Perspectives on Embodiment: The Intersection of Nature and Culture and Jane Arthurs and Jean Grimshaw. Women's Bodies: Discipline and Transgression. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (2):160-169.
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  49. Denis Reuter (2008). Der Weimar-Jena-Plan: Die Beziehung des Nietzsche-Archivs Zur Universität Jena 1930-1935. Vdg.
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  50. Thomas Reuter & Alexander Horstmann (eds.) (2012). Faith in the Future: Understanding the Revitalization of Religions and Cultural Traditions in Asia. Brill.
    Revitalization of religious and cultural traditions is taking place in nearly all contemporary Asian societies and beyond. Faith in the Future: Understanding the Revitalization of Religions and Cultural Traditions in Asia provides a comparative analysis of the key features and aspirations of revitalization movements and assesses their scope for shaping the future trajectories of societies in all parts of the world.
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