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Havi Carel [19]Havi Hannah Carel [1]
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Profile: Havi Hannah Carel (Bristol University)
Profile: Havi Carel (University of the West of England)
  1. Havi Carel (2014). The Philosophical Role of Illness. Metaphilosophy 45 (1):20-40.
    This article examines the philosophical role of illness. It briefly surveys the philosophical role accorded to illness in the history of philosophy and explains why illness merits such a role. It suggests that illness modifies, and thus sheds light on, normal experience, revealing its ordinary and therefore overlooked structure. Illness also provides an opportunity for reflection by performing a kind of suspension (epoché) of previously held beliefs, including tacit beliefs. The article argues that these characteristics warrant a philosophical role for (...)
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  2. Havi Carel (2013). Bedside Conversations. Philosophers' Magazine 60 (-1):94 - 98.
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  3. Havi Carel (2013). Bodily Doubt. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    In this paper I explore the tacit underlying sense of bodily certainty that characterizes normal everyday embodied experience. I then propose illness as one instance in which this certainty breaks down and is replaced by bodily doubt. I characterize bodily doubt as radically modifying our experience in three ways: loss of continuity, loss of transparency, and loss of faith in one's body. I then discuss the philosophical insights that arise from the experience of bodily doubt. The paper uses a Humean (...)
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  4. Havi Hannah Carel (2013). Illness, Phenomenology, and Philosophical Method. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (4):345-357.
    In this article, I propose that illness is philosophically revealing and can be used to explore human experience. I suggest that illness is a limit case of embodied experience. By pushing embodied experience to its limit, illness sheds light on normal experience, revealing its ordinary and thus overlooked structure. Illness produces a distancing effect, which allows us to observe normal human behavior and cognition via their pathological counterpart. I suggest that these characteristics warrant illness a philosophical role that has not (...)
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  5. Havi Carel & Rachel Valerie Cooper (eds.) (2013). Health, Illness and Disease: Philosophical Essays. Acumen.
    What counts as health or ill health? How do we deal with the fallibility of our own bodies? Should illness and disease be considered simply in biological terms, or should considerations of its emotional impact dictate our treatment of it? Our understanding of health and illness had become increasingly more complex in the modern world, as we are able to use medicine not only to fight disease but to control other aspects of our bodies, whether mood, blood pressure, or cholesterol. (...)
     
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  6. Havi Carel & Darian Meacham (eds.) (2013). Phenomenology and Naturalism. Cambridge University Press.
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  7. Havi Carel & Darian Meacham (2013). Phenomenology and Naturalism: Editors' Introduction. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:1-21.
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  8. Havi Carel (2012). Bernard N. Schumacher: Death and Mortality in Contemporary Philosophy, Trans. Michael J. Miller. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, 258 Pp, $28.99 (Paperback), ISBN 978-0-521-17119-9; Jeffrey P. Bishop: The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2011, 411 Pp, $35.00 (Paperback), ISBN 978-0-268-02227-3. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):435-441.
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  9. Havi Carel (2012). Bernard N. Schumacher:, Trans. Michael J. Miller. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, 258 Pp, $28.99 (Paperback), ISBN 978-0-521-17119-9; Jeffrey P. Bishop:. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2011, 411 Pp, $35.00 (Paperback), ISBN 978-0-268-02227-3. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):435-441.
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  10. Havi Carel (2011). Phenomenology and its Application in Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):33-46.
    Phenomenology is a useful methodology for describing and ordering experience. As such, phenomenology can be specifically applied to the first person experience of illness in order to illuminate this experience and enable health care providers to enhance their understanding of it. However, this approach has been underutilized in the philosophy of medicine as well as in medical training and practice. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of phenomenology to clinical medicine. In order to describe the experience of illness, we need a (...)
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  11. Havi Carel & Greg Tuck (eds.) (2011). New Takes in Film-Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    New Takes in Film-Philosophy offers a space for the advancement of the film-philosophy debate by some of its major figures. Fifteen leading academics from Philosophy and Film Studies develop new approaches to film-philosophy, broaden theoretical analyses of the topic and map out problems and possibilities for its future. The collection examines theoretical issues about the relationship between film and philosophy; looks at the relationships film-philosophy has to other media such as photography and literature; and applies theoretical approaches to particular films (...)
     
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  12. Havi Carel & Rachel Cooper (2010). Introduction: Culture-Bound Syndromes. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):307-308.
  13. Havi Carel & Greg Tuck (2010). Film as Philosophy. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):30-31.
    More people desperately require an organ than become donors themselves. When discussing organ donation, people mainly consider the question whether they want to donate, whereas empirically they are more likely to be on the receiving end. So it is rational for each of us to join the organ donor register and to agree to donate our relative’s organs, if we are ever in that situation.
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  14. Matthew R. Broome & Havi Carel (2009). The Ubiquity of Moods. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):267-271.
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  15. Havi Carel (2009). A Reply to 'Towards an Understanding of Nursing as a Response to Human Vulnerability' by Derek Sellman: Vulnerability and Illness. Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):214-219.
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  16. Havi Carel (2008). The Problem of Organ Donation. The Philosophers' Magazine 42 (3rd qu):43-49.
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  17. Havi Carel (2007). Can I Be Ill and Happy? Philosophia 35 (2):95-110.
    Can one be ill and happy? I use a phenomenological approach to provide an answer to this question, using Merleau-Ponty’s distinction between the biological and the lived body. I begin by discussing the rift between the biological body and the ill person’s lived experience, which occurs in illness. The transparent and taken for granted biological body is problematised by illness, which exposes it as different from the lived experience of this body. I argue that because of this rift, the experience (...)
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  18. Havi Carel (2007). Temporal Finitude and Finitude of Possibility: The Double Meaning of Death in Being and Time. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):541 – 556.
    The confusion surrounding Heidegger's account of death in Being and Time has led to severe criticisms, some of which dismiss his analysis as incoherent and obtuse. I argue that Heidegger's critics err by equating Heidegger's concept of death with our ordinary concept. As I show, Heidegger's concept of death is not the same as the ordinary meaning of the term, namely, the event that ends life. But nor does this concept merely denote the finitude of Dasein's possibilities or the groundlessness (...)
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  19. Havi Carel (2006). Moral and Epistemic Ambiguity in Oedipus Rex. Janus Head 9 (1):91-109.
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  20. Havi Carel (2001). Peter Brooks and Alex Woloch, Eds., Whose Freud? The Place of Psychoanalysis in Contemporary Culture Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 21 (4):242-244.
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