Search results for 'Having' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  24
    Elvio Baccarini (2013). Having a Reason and Distributive Justice in The Order of Public Reason. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 9 (1):25-51.
    In the first part of the paper, Gaus’ ground for the ideal of persons as free and equal is described. Doubts are raised about the appropriateness of the use of his account of this ideal as endogenous to our moral practice. Th e worries are related to the use of the concept of having a reason that Gaus makes in his book, as well as to the aptness of his account of our moral practice from the viewpoint of our (...)
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  2.  51
    I. L. Humberstone (1990). Wanting, Getting, Having. Philosophical Papers 99 (August):99-118.
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  3.  24
    John Corcoran & Idris Samawi Hamid (2016). Two-Method Errors: Having It Both Ways. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 21:444-5.
    ►JOHN CORCORAN AND IDRIS SAMAWI HAMID, Two-method errors: having it both ways. Philosophy, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-4150, USA E-mail: corcoran@buffalo.edu Philosophy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1781 USA E-mail: ishamid@colostate.edu Where two methods produce similar results, mixing the two sometimes creates errors we call two-method errors, TMEs: in style, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, implicature, logic, or action. This lecture analyzes examples found in technical and in non-technical contexts. One can say “Abe knows whether Ben draws” in two (...)
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  4.  28
    Jatinder J. Singh, Oriol Iglesias & Joan Manel Batista-Foguet (2012). Does Having an Ethical Brand Matter? The Influence of Consumer Perceived Ethicality on Trust, Affect and Loyalty. Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4):541-549.
    The recent rise in ethical consumerism has seen increasing numbers of corporate brands project a socially responsible and ethical image. But does having a corporate brand that is perceived to be ethical have any influence on outcome variables of interest for its product brands? This study analyzes the relationship between perceived ethicality at a corporate level, and brand trust, brand affect and brand loyalty at a product level. A theoretical framework with hypothesized relationships is developed and tested in order (...)
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  5. Errol Lord (2010). Having Reasons and the Factoring Account. Philosophical Studies 149 (3):283 - 296.
    It’s natural to say that when it’s rational for me to φ, I have reasons to φ. That is, there are reasons for φ-ing, and moreover, I have some of them. Mark Schroeder calls this view The Factoring Account of the having reasons relation. He thinks The Factoring Account is false. In this paper, I defend The Factoring Account. Not only do I provide intuitive support for the view, but I also defend it against Schroeder’s criticisms. Moreover, I show (...)
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  6.  79
    Cameron Hamilton, On the Possibility of Robots Having Emotions.
    I argue against the commonly held intuition that robots and virtual agents will never have emotions by contending robots can have emotions in a sense that is functionally similar to humans, even if the robots' emotions are not exactly equivalent to those of humans. To establish a foundation for assessing the robots' emotional capacities, I first define what emotions are by characterizing the components of emotion consistent across emotion theories. Second, I dissect the affective-cognitive architecture of MIT's Kismet and Leonardo, (...)
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  7.  21
    Jada Twedt Strabbing (2016). Attributability, Weakness of Will, and the Importance of Just Having the Capacity. Philosophical Studies 173 (2):289-307.
    A common objection to particular views of attributability is that they fail to account for weakness of will. In this paper, I show that the problem of weakness of will is much deeper than has been recognized, extending to all views of attributability on offer because of the general form that these views take. The fundamental problem is this: current views claim that being attributionally responsible is a matter of exercising whatever capacity that they take to be relevant to (...)
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  8. Matthew Stuart (2010). Having Locke's Ideas. Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 35-59.
    Our understanding of Locke’s theory of ideas is stymied by his reticence about what he means by ‘idea’. I attempt to work around the problem by focusing on some neglected questions that afford us a better picture of his theory. I ask not what his ideas are, but what kinds of states or episodes he counts as someone’s having an idea, and what is involved in having simple and complex ideas. I argue that although we can make sense (...)
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  9. Peter Kung (2010). On Having No Reason: Dogmatism and Bayesian Confirmation. Synthese 177 (1):1 - 17.
    Recently in epistemology a number of authors have mounted Bayesian objections to dogmatism. These objections depend on a Bayesian principle of evidential confirmation: Evidence E confirms hypothesis H just in case Pr(H|E) > Pr(H). I argue using Keynes' and Knight's distinction between risk and uncertainty that the Bayesian principle fails to accommodate the intuitive notion of having no reason to believe. Consider as an example an unfamiliar card game: at first, since you're unfamiliar with the game, you assign credences (...)
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  10.  67
    Gui Lu Long, Yi-Fan Zhou, Jia-Qi Jin, Yang Sun & Hai-Woong Lee (2006). Density Matrix in Quantum Mechanics and Distinctness of Ensembles Having the Same Compressed Density Matrix. Foundations of Physics 36 (8):1217-1243.
    We clarify different definitions of the density matrix by proposing the use of different names, the full density matrix for a single-closed quantum system, the compressed density matrix for the averaged single molecule state from an ensemble of molecules, and the reduced density matrix for a part of an entangled quantum system, respectively. We show that ensembles with the same compressed density matrix can be physically distinguished by observing fluctuations of various observables. This is in contrast to a general belief (...)
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  11.  17
    Jessica Toit (2015). Is Having Pets Morally Permissible? Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4).
    In this article, I consider the question of whether having pets is morally permissible. However, I do so indirectly by considering three objections to the practice of having pets — what I shall call the ‘restriction of freedom objection’, the ‘property objection’, and the ‘dependency objection’. The restriction of freedom objection is dismissed relatively easily. The property objection also fails to show that having pets is morally impermissible. However, my consideration of this second objection does lead to (...)
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  12.  19
    Michele Rapoport (2013). Being a Body or Having One: Automated Domestic Technologies and Corporeality. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (2):209-218.
    New, “smart,” automated technologies for the home are playing a growing role in the construction and refurbishment of many new middle and upper class homes and assisted living facilities in the developed world, promising the improved performance of domestic tasks, as well as enhanced safety, convenience, and efficiency. Expanding the growing automatization of many activities in daily life, automated technologies in the home are interactive, ubiquitous, and often invisible. Their installation, in what is understood to be the locus of personal (...)
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  13.  48
    Stuart Rachels (2014). The Immorality of Having Children. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):567-582.
    This paper defends the Famine Relief Argument against Having Children, which goes as follows: conceiving and raising a child costs hundreds of thousands of dollars; that money would be far better spent on famine relief; therefore, conceiving and raising children is immoral. It is named after Peter Singer’s Famine Relief Argument because it might be a special case of Singer’s argument and because it exposes the main practical implication of Singer’s argument—namely, that we should not become parents. I answer (...)
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  14.  83
    Jorn Sonderholm (2008). Having Fun with the Periodic Table: A Counterexample to Rea's Definition of Pornography. Philosophia 36 (2):233-236.
    In a paper from 2001, Michael C. Rea considers the question of what pornography is. First, he examines a number of existing definitions of ‘pornography’, and after having rejected them all, he goes on to present his own preferred definition. In this short paper, I suggest a counterexample to Rea’s definition. In particular, I suggest that there is something that, on the one hand, is pornography according to Rea’s definition, but, on the other hand, is not something that we (...)
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  15.  8
    Ofra Koffman (2012). Children Having Children? Religion, Psychology and the Birth of the Teenage Pregnancy Problem. History of the Human Sciences 25 (1):119-134.
    This article presents a genealogical examination of the emergence of governmental concern with ‘children having children’, focusing on the work of the London County Council and local voluntary organizations in the 1950s and 1960s. The article explores the moral-Christian discourse shaping governmental work with ‘unwed mothers' and identifies the discursive shifts associated with the ascent of the problematization of ‘teenage motherhood’. It is argued that within the moral-Christian discourse, a woman’s subjectivity was delineated primarily according to her ‘character’ not (...)
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  16.  2
    Clifton Ealy, Krzysztof Krupiński & Anand Pillay (2008). Superrosy Dependent Groups Having Finitely Satisfiable Generics. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 151 (1):1-21.
    We develop a basic theory of rosy groups and we study groups of small Uþ-rank satisfying NIP and having finitely satisfiable generics: Uþ-rank 1 implies that the group is abelian-by-finite, Uþ-rank 2 implies that the group is solvable-by-finite, Uþ-rank 2, and not being nilpotent-by-finite implies the existence of an interpretable algebraically closed field.
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  17.  14
    Daniela Cutas (2011). On Triparenting. Is Having Three Committed Parents Better Than Having Only Two? Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):735-738.
    Although research indicates that single parenting is not by itself worse for children than their being brought up by both their parents, there are reasons why it is better for children to have more than one committed parent. If having two committed parents is better, everything else being equal, than having just one, I argue that it might be even better for children to have three committed parents. There might, in addition, be further reasons why allowing triparenting would (...)
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  18.  11
    Bernard E. Whitley (2001). Gender Differences in Affective Responses to Having Cheated: The Mediating Role of Attitudes. Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):249 – 259.
    Although women hold more negative attitudes toward cheating than do men, they are about as likely to engage in academic dishonesty. Cognitive dissonance theory predicts that this attitude-behavior inconsistency should lead women to experience more negative affect after cheating than would men. This prediction was tested in a sample of 92 male and 78 female college students who reported having cheated on an examination during the prior 6 months. Consistent with the results of previous research, women reported more negative (...)
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  19.  27
    Robert E. Woodrow (1976). A Note on Countable Complete Theories Having Three Isomorphism Types of Countable Models. Journal of Symbolic Logic 41 (3):672-680.
    With quantifier elimination and restriction of language to a binary relation symbol and constant symbols it is shown that countable complete theories having three isomorphism types of countable models are "essentially" the Ehrenfeucht example [4, $\s6$ ].
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  20.  4
    T. Kushner (1984). Having a Life Versus Being Alive. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (1):5-8.
    In an attempt to provide some clarification in the abortion issue it has recently been proposed that since 'brain death' is used to define the end of life, 'brain life' would be a logical demarcation for life's beginning. This paper argues in support of this position, not on empirical grounds, but because of what it reflects of what is valuable about the term 'life'. It is pointed out that 'life' is an ambiguous concept as it is used in English, obscuring (...)
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  21.  7
    Peter McLaughlin (2002). On Having a Function and Having a Good. Analyse & Kritik 24 (1):130-43.
    One result of recent discussions on the notion of function is that the appeal to the function of something in order to explain why it is there and what it is, presupposes that some system particularly relevant to the function bearer has a good. Some recent analyses of what it means to have a good trace having a good back to having a function. Two such attempts are examined and compared to a more traditional analysis. An anachronistic version (...)
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  22.  21
    Liezl van Zyl (2007). Can Virtuous People Emerge From Tragic Dilemmas Having Acted Well? Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):50–61.
    A tragic dilemma is thought to arise when an agent, through no fault of her own, finds herself in a situation where she must choose between two courses of action, both of which it would be wrong to undertake. I focus on tragic dilemmas that are resolvable, that is, where a reason can be given in favour of one course of action over another, and my aim is to examine whether Hursthouse's virtue-ethical account of right action succeeds in avoiding two (...)
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  23.  17
    Tom Kitwood (1977). What Does 'Having Values' Mean? Journal of Moral Education 6 (2):81-89.
    Abstract This papers confronts the social?psychological problem of the relation between values and persons in everyday life. For this purpose simple operational definitions, as used in psychometric work, are not adequate. There must be a clear conception of the person, as an individual, in a social setting. A model which meets these requirements, with seven components, is described. This is used to illustrate what ?having values? might mean. Three applications are briefly outlined.
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  24.  8
    Anna Greco (2011). 'Having One's Own' and Distributive Justice in Plato's Republic. History of Political Thought 32 (2):185-214.
    Although Plato did not explicitly propose any principle of distributive justice, he indicated that justice involves both the doing and the having of one's own. On the interpretation I am proposing: (i) 'having one's own' refers directly to the compensation one receives for doing one's own; (ii) the principle of distribution of benefits that is actually operative in Plato's system is that any form of compensation must be such that the worker (whether ruler, soldier or producer) has his (...)
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  25.  16
    Douglas Lewis (2007). Spinoza on Having a False Idea. Metaphysica 8 (1):17-27.
    Naturalism pervades Spinoza’s doctrines of The Ethics, but the contours of it often bewilder us. In this light, I consider the account of falsity, or having a false idea, as presented by Spinoza in Proposition thirty_five of the Second Part, its demonstration, and the subsequent note. Based on my interpretation I argue for the claim that his account has coherence and makes sense. Further, I examine the significance of what Spinoza says about falsity for comprehension of his philosophy overall, (...)
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  26.  3
    Izaskun Larrieta‐Rubín de Celis, Eva Velasco‐Balmaseda, Sara Fernández de Bobadilla, María del Mar Alonso‐Almeida & Gurutze Intxaurburu‐Clemente (2015). Does Having Women Managers Lead to Increased Gender Equality Practices in Corporate Social Responsibility? Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (1):91-110.
    There is increasing interest in determining what impact having women in management positions may have on corporate social responsibility initiatives. Various authors suggest that gender equality practices should be factored into the broader framework of CSR. This paper examines how the presence of women on corporate boards, in top and middle management and as heads of CSR departments, influences gender equality practices in the field of CSR. Using information collected from companies that have signed up to Women's Empowerment Principles (...)
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  27.  13
    Mark P. Aulisio, Thomas May & Geoffrey D. Block (2001). Procreation for Donation: The Moral and Political Permissibility of “Having a Child to Save a Child”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):408-419.
    The crisis in donor organ and tissue supply is one of the most difficult challenges for transplant today. New policy initiatives, such as the driver's license option and requiredrequest, have been implemented in many states, with other initiatives, such as mandatedchoice and presumedconsent, proposed in the hopes of ameliorating this crisis. At the same time, traditional acquisition of organs from human cadavers has been augmented by living human donors, and nonheartbeating human donors, as well as experimental animal and artificial sources. (...)
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  28.  2
    J. N. Findlay (1953). On Having in Mind. Philosophy 28 (107):291 - 310.
    Sir David Ross, Ladies And Gentlemen: I Have chosen as the topic of this inaugural lecture that of “having in mind,” the manner or manners in which things come before us in consciousness, are present to our thoughts, or are in some way “there for us.” Alternatively, I might say that I want to consider whatever may be involved in saying that we can turn our thoughts in this or that direction, that we can let them dwell on this (...)
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  29.  1
    Stephen David Ross (2001). The Gift of Property: Having the Good / Betraying Genitivity, Economy and Ecology, an Ethic of the Earth. State University of New York Press.
    Explores the human propensity for owning and having.
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  30. John Henry McDowell (2009). Having the World in View: Essays on Kant, Hegel, and Sellars. Harvard University Press.
    In this new book, John McDowell builds on his much discussed Mind and World—one of the most highly regarded books in contemporary philosophy.
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  31.  65
    John Haugeland (1998). Having Thought: Essays in the Metaphysics of Mind. Harvard University Press.
    The unifying theme of these thirteen essays is understanding.
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  32.  21
    M. Tsakiris, G. Prabhu & P. Haggard (2006). Having a Body Versus Moving Your Body: How Agency Structures Body-Ownership. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):423-432.
    We investigated how motor agency in the voluntary control of body movement influences body awareness. In the Rubber Hand Illusion , synchronous tactile stimulation of a rubber hand and the participant’s hand leads to a feeling of the rubber hand being incorporated in the participant’s own body. One quantifiable behavioural correlate of the illusion is an induced shift in the perceived location of the participant’s hand towards the rubber hand. Previous studies showed that the induced changes in body awareness are (...)
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  33. William Marias Malisoff (1941). On Having a Philosophy. Philosophy of Science 8 (2):140-141.
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  34. Mark Schroeder (2008). Having Reasons. Philosophical Studies 139 (1):57 - 71.
    What is it to have a reason? According to one common idea, the "Factoring Account", you have a reason to do A when there is a reason for you to do A which you have--which is somehow in your possession or grasp. In this paper, I argue that this common idea is false. But though my arguments are based on the practical case, the implications of this are likely to be greatest in epistemology: for the pitfalls we fall into when (...)
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  35. Jerry A. Fodor (2004). Having Concepts: A Brief Refutation of the Twentieth Century. Mind and Language 19 (1):29-47.
  36.  19
    Arturs Logins (2015). On Having Evidence: A Reply to Neta. Logos and Episteme 6 (3): 367-370.
    According to one line of thought only propositions can be part of one’s evidence, since only propositions can serve the central functions of our ordinary concept of evidence. Ram Neta has challenged this argument. In this paper I respond to Neta’s challenge.
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  37. Bruce Seifert, Sara A. Morris & Barbara R. Bartkus (2004). Having, Giving, and Getting: Slack Resources, Corporate Philanthropy, and Firm Financial Performance. Business and Society 43 (2):135-161.
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  38. Karen Bennett (2013). Having a Part Twice Over. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (1):83 - 103.
    I argue that it is intuitive and useful to think about composition in the light of the familiar functionalist distinction between role and occupant. This involves factoring the standard notion of parthood into two related notions: being a parthood slot and occupying a parthood slot. One thing is part of another just in case it fills one of that thing's parthood slots. This move opens room to rethink mereology in various ways, and, in particular, to see the mereological structure of (...)
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  39. Andreas Elpidorou (2013). Having It Both Ways: Consciousness, Unique Not Otherworldly. Philosophia 41 (4):1181-1203.
    I respond to Chalmers’ (2006, 2010) objection to the Phenomenal Concept Strategy (PCS) by showing that his objection is faced with a dilemma that ultimately undercuts its force. Chalmers argues that no version of PCS can posit psychological features that are both physically explicable and capable of explaining our epistemic situation. In response, I show that what Chalmers calls ‘our epistemic situation’ admits either of a phenomenal or of a topic-neutral characterization, neither of which supports Chalmers’ objection. On the one (...)
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  40.  91
    Sigrún Svavarsdóttir (2014). Having Value and Being Worth Valuing. Journal of Philosophy 111 (2):84-109.
    This paper explores the relationship between the ascription of value to an object and an assessment of conative attitudes taken towards that object. It argues that this relationship is captured by an a priori necessary truth that falls out of the mastery conditions for the concept of value: what has value is worth valuing, when valuing is understood to be a relatively stable conative attitude distinct from judging valuable. What kind of assessment of attitude is at stake? How are we (...)
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  41.  40
    George A. Coe (1915). On Having Friends: A Study of Social Values. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 12 (6):155-161.
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  42.  53
    Ema Sullivan-Bissett & Paul Noordhof (2013). A Defence of Owens' Exclusivity Objection to Beliefs Having Aims. Philosophical Studies 163 (2):453-457.
    In this paper we argue that Steglich-Petersen’s response to Owens’ Exclusivity Objection does not work. Our first point is that the examples Steglich-Petersen uses to demonstrate his argument do not work because they employ an undefended conception of the truth aim not shared by his target (and officially eschewed by Steglich-Petersen himself). Secondly we will make the point that deliberating over whether to form a belief about p is not part of the belief forming process. When an agent enters into (...)
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  43.  53
    Akito Tsuboi (1985). On Theories Having a Finite Number of Nonisomorphic Countable Models. Journal of Symbolic Logic 50 (3):806-808.
  44. John McDowell (1998). Having the World in View: Sellars, Kant, and Intentionality. Journal of Philosophy 95 (9):431-492.
  45.  9
    Jack J. Vromen (2009). The Booming Economics-Made-Fun Genre: More Than Having Fun, but Less Than Economics Imperialism. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 2 (1):70-99.
  46.  18
    Marc Champagne & Mimi Reisel Gladstein (2015). Beauvoir and Rand: Asphyxiating People, Having Sex, and Pursuing a Career. The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 15 (1):23-41.
    In an attempt to start rectifying a lamentable disparity in scholarship, we evince fruitful points of similarity and difference in the ideas of Simone de Beauvoir and Ayn Rand, paying particular attention to their views on long-term projects. Endorsing what might be called an “Ethic of Resolve,” Rand praises those who undertake sustained goal-directed actions such as careers. Beauvoir, however, endorses an “Ethic of Ambiguity” that makes her more skeptical about the prospects of carrying out lifelong projects without deluding oneself. (...)
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  47. Rob Lovering (2012). On the Morality of Having Faith That God Exists. Sophia 51 (1):17-30.
    Many theists who identify themselves with the Abrahamic religions maintain that it is perfectly acceptable to have faith that God exists. In this paper, I argue that, when believing that God exists will affect others, it is prima facie wrong to forgo attempting to believe that God exists on the basis of sufficient evidence. Lest there be any confusion : I do not argue that it is always wrong to have faith that God exists, only that, under certain conditions, it (...)
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  48.  97
    Robert A. Wilson (2008). The Drink You Have When You're Not Having a Drink. Mind and Language 23 (3):273–283.
    The Architecture of the Mind is itself built on foundations that deserve probing. In this brief commentary I focus on these foundations—Carruthers’ conception of modularity, his arguments for thinking that the mind is massively modular in structure, and his view of human cognitive architecture.
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  49. Steven M. Duncan, Having Faith in Reason.
    An Address delivered to the Seattle G. K. Chesterton Society at the University of Washington Newman Center, May 2, 2013.
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  50. Sharyn Clough (2004). Having It All: Naturalized Normativity in Feminist Science Studies. Hypatia 19 (1):102-118.
    : The relationship between facts and values—in particular, naturalism and normativity—poses an ongoing challenge for feminist science studies. Some have argued that the fact/value holism of W.V. Quine's naturalized epistemology holds promise. I argue that Quinean epistemology, while appropriately naturalized, might weaken the normative force of feminist claims. I then show that Quinean epistemic themes are unnecessary for feminist science studies. The empirical nature of our work provides us with all the naturalized normativity we need.
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