Search results for 'Health Maintenance Organizations' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joanne B. Stern (1983). Will the Tort of Bad Faith Breach of Contract Be Extended to Health Maintenance Organizations? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 11 (1):12-18.score: 450.0
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  2. Robert Connor, Douglas R. Wholey, Roger Feldman & William Riley (2004). The Check Is in the Mail: Determinants of Claims Payable Timing Among Health Maintenance Organizations. Inquiry 41 (1):70-82.score: 450.0
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  3. Marsha R. Gold, Timothy Lake, Robert Hurley & Michael Sinclair (2002). Financial Risk Sharing with Providers in Health Maintenance Organizations, 1999. Inquiry 39 (1):34-44.score: 450.0
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  4. Marjorie Chan (2002). Violations of Service Fairness and Legal Ramifications: The Case of the Managed Care Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (4):315 - 336.score: 270.0
    Adapted from Chan's (2000) model depicting success of litigation, this paper argues that with the application of various legislation, health maintenance organizations' (HMOs') violations of service fairness to each group: enrollees, physicians, and hospitals give rise to each group's lawsuits against the HMOs. Various authors (Bowen et al., 1999; Seiders and Berry, 1998) indicate that justice concepts such as distributive, procedural, and interactional justice can be applied to the area of service fairness. The violation of these underlying (...)
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  5. Roy G. Spece, David S. Shimm & Allen E. Buchanan (eds.) (1996). Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Practice and Research. Oxford University Press.score: 216.0
    Our society has long sanctioned, at least tacitly, a degree of conflict of interest in medical practice and clinical research as an unavoidable consequence of the different interests of the physician or clinical investigator, the patient or clinical research subject, third party payers or research sponsors, the government, and society as a whole, to name a few. In the past, resolution of these conflicts has been left to the conscience of the individual physician or clinical investigator and to professional (...). The public is no longer willing to allow health care providers to wholly govern their own conflicts of interest for several reasons. These include: new forms of health care financing and delivery that provide innovative and lucrative opportunities for physician or insurer enrichment at patient expense; the increased importance of commercial research support as peer-reviewed governmental research support has decreased; evidence that physicians and clinical investigators too frequently resolve conflicts of interest in their own favor; and a general societal mistrust of authority. This volume represents a multidisciplinary effort, drawing from philosophy, medicine, law, economics and public policy to identify and categorize conflicts of interest in medical practice and clinical research, and, where possible, to offer a mechanism for resolving them. Part I addresses conflicts of interest from a theoretical perspective, offering basic concepts and analytical frameworks. The second part discusses two topics prominent in current health care policy debates--self-referral and financial incentives to limit care. Part III examines conflicts of interest generated by pharmaceutical industry involvement in clinical practice and research. The final section deals with conflicts of interest in clinical research in several contexts, including institutional reviews boards, clinical trials, Cooperative Research and Development Agreements between government and private researchers, brokerage of research subjects by Contract Research Organizations, and cost-effectiveness studies. (shrink)
     
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  6. Sandra J. Tanenbaum (2011). Mental Health Consumer-Operated Services Organizations in the US: Citizenship as a Core Function and Strategy for Growth. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (2):192-205.score: 198.0
    Consumer-operated services organizations (COSOs) are independent, non-profit organizations that provide peer support and other non-clinical services to seriously mentally ill people. Mental health consumers provide many of these services and make up at least a majority of the organization’s leadership. Although the dominant conception of the COSO is as an adjunct to clinical care in the public mental health system, this paper reconceives the organization as a civic association and thereby a locus of citizenship. Drawing on (...)
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  7. Mark H. Waymack (1990). The Ethics of Selectively Marketing the Health Maintenance Organization. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (4).score: 168.0
    Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) administrators have been accused of engaging in selective marketing. That is, through such strategies as tailoring the benefits package of the program or advertising in styles or in media that do not appeal to certain undesirable audiences, the administrator can minimize the percentage of persons in the HMO who are heavy users of health care services.By means of analyzing what insurance is (philosophically) and what it means for something to be a free market (...)
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  8. Katharine Kolcaba (1994). Health Maintenance as Responsibility for Self. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (2):19-24.score: 168.0
    Many kinds of health compromising norms, habits, and beliefs are highly resistant to change thereby preventing new knowledge about health maintenance from advancing widespread better health. Persons would be more responsive if they used a health ethic to harmonize personal behavior with health-maintaining practices. We argue that common sense morality includes a portion of a health ethic in the guise of responsibilities to maintain health as well as avoid self destruction. We discuss (...)
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  9. Joachim P. Sturmberg (2011). Primary Health Care Organizations – Through a Conceptual and a Political Lens. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (3):525-529.score: 152.0
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  10. Sofia Kälvemark Sporrong, Bengt Arnetz, Mats G. Hansson, Peter Westerholm & Anna T. Höglund (2007). Developing Ethical Competence in Health Care Organizations. Nursing Ethics 14 (6):825-837.score: 146.0
    Increased work complexity and financial strain in the health care sector have led to higher demands on staff to handle ethical issues. These demands can elicit stress reactions, that is, moral distress. One way to support professionals in handling ethical dilemmas is education and training in ethics. This article reports on a controlled prospective study evaluating a structured education and training program in ethics concerning its effects on moral distress. The results show that the participants were positive about the (...)
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  11. David Albert Bjork (2010). Regulation of Executive Compensation at Nonprofit Health Care Organizations: Coming Changes? Inquiry 47 (1):7-16.score: 140.0
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  12. G. K. D. Crozier & Kyle Thomsen (2010). Stem Cell Tourism and The Role of Health Professional Organizations. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (5):36-38.score: 140.0
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  13. Carolyn Ells (2012). Respect for People in Situations of Vulnerability: A New Principle for Health-Care Professionals and Health-Care Organizations. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):180-185.score: 140.0
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  14. Alexandra Gekas (1991). The PSDA of 1991: What Does It Mean for Health-Care Organizations. Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (3):205.score: 140.0
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  15. Michelle Jordon, Holly Jordan Lanham, Ruth A. Anderson & Reuben R. McDaniel Jr (2010). Implications of Complex Adaptive Systems Theory for Interpreting Research About Health Care Organizations. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (1):228-231.score: 140.0
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  16. James B. Lewis (2008). Strategic Marketing for Health Care Organizations: Building a Customer-Driven Health System. Inquiry 45 (3):353-354.score: 140.0
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  17. Martin D. Merry (2005). To Do No Harm: Ensuring Patient Safety in Health Care Organizations. Inquiry 42 (4):421-422.score: 140.0
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  18. Stanley Joel Reiser (1994). The Ethical Life of Health Care Organizations. Hastings Center Report 24 (6):28-35.score: 140.0
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  19. Edward M. Spencer & Ann E. Mills (1999). Ethics in Health Care Organizations. HEC Forum 11 (4):323-332.score: 140.0
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  20. Terry Andrus, William Cox, Bradford Gray, Cleve Killingsworth, Paula Steiner & Bruce McPherson (2008). Nonprofit Health Care Organizations and Universal Health Care Coverage. Inquiry 45 (1):7-14.score: 140.0
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  21. Evelyn Brody, Doug Hammer, Oliver Henkel, Patsy Matheny, Alan R. Morse & Bruce McPherson (2007). The Future of Property Tax Exemption for Nonprofit Health Care Organizations. Inquiry 44 (3):238-246.score: 140.0
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  22. Anthony Cirillo, Jeffrey Cowart, John Kaegi, Geoffrey Taylor & Bruce McPherson (2008). Advertising by Nonprofit Health Care Organizations. Inquiry 45 (3):256-262.score: 140.0
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  23. Carmel M. Martin (2010). Making Sense of Polarities in Health Organizations for Policy and Leadership. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (5):990-993.score: 132.0
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  24. Bridget M. Carney (2001). Breaches of Confidentiality and the Electronic Community Health Record: Challenges for Healthcare Organizations and the Community. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 13 (2):138-147.score: 120.0
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  25. Suzi Ruhl, Man Stephens & Paul Locke (2003). The Role of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in Public Health Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (s4):76-77.score: 120.0
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  26. Bodil Landstad & Vinberg (2013). Female Leaders' Experiences of Psychosocial Working Conditions and its Health Consequences in Swedish Public Human Service Organizations. Vulnerable Groups and Inclusion 4.score: 120.0
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  27. Masami Matsuda & Geoffrey Hunt (2004). Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) in Japan and the 'Hermit Crabs' Home' Mental Health Project. Nursing Ethics 11 (2):203-204.score: 120.0
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  28. Andrew Miles, Paul Bentley, Nicholas Price, Andreas Polychronis, Joseph Grey & Jonathan Asbridge (1996). The Total Health Care Audit System: A Systematic Methodology for Clinical Practice Evaluation and Development in NHS Provider Organizations. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2 (1):37-64.score: 120.0
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  29. Nelly Oudshoorn (2007). Constructing the Digital Patient: Patient Organizations and the Development of Health Web Sites. In Regula Valérie Burri & Joseph Dumit (eds.), Biomedicine as Culture: Instrumental Practices, Technoscientific Knowledge, and New Modes of Life. Routledge. 6--205.score: 120.0
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  30. David O. Renz & William B. Eddy (1996). Organizations, Ethics, and Health Care: Building an Ethics Infrastructure for a New Era. Bioethics Forum 12 (2):29-39.score: 120.0
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  31. Hester M. Bovenkamp & Margo J. Trappenburg (2011). Government Influence on Patient Organizations. Health Care Analysis 19 (4):329-351.score: 108.0
    Patient organizations increasingly play an important role in health care decision-making in Western countries. The Netherlands is one of the countries where this trend has gone furthest. In the literature some problems are identified, such as instrumental use of patient organizations by care providers, health insurers and the pharmaceutical industry. To strengthen the position of patient organizations government funding is often recommended as a solution. In this paper we analyze the ties between Dutch government and (...)
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  32. John D. Pringle & Donald C. Cole (2009). Health Research in Complex Emergencies: A Humanitarian Imperative. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):115-123.score: 84.0
    Health researchers, research trainees, and ethics reviewers should be prepared for the special application of research ethics within complex humanitarian emergencies. This paper argues that as a precursor to published ethical guidelines for conducting research in complex emergencies, researchers and research ethics committees should observe the following primary ethical considerations: (1) the research is not at the expense of humanitarian action; (2) the research is justified in that it is needs-driven and relevant to the affected populations; and (3) the (...)
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  33. Matthew R. Hunt, Lisa Schwartz, Christina Sinding & Laurie Elit (2012). The Ethics of Engaged Presence: A Framework for Health Professionals in Humanitarian Assistance and Development Work. Developing World Bioethics 12 (3):47-55.score: 84.0
    In this article, we present an ethics framework for health practice in humanitarian and development work: the ethics of engaged presence. The ethics of engaged presence framework aims to articulate in a systematic fashion approaches and orientations that support the engagement of expatriate health care professionals in ways that align with diverse obligations and responsibilities, and promote respectful and effective action and relationships. Drawn from a range of sources, the framework provides a vocabulary and narrative structure for examining (...)
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  34. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 81.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  35. Mette Vaarst & Hugo Alrøe (2012). Concepts of Animal Health and Welfare in Organic Livestock Systems. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):333-347.score: 80.0
    In 2005, The International Federation of Organic Agricultural Movements (IFOAM) developed four new ethical principles of organic agriculture to guide its future development: the principles of health, ecology, care, and fairness. The key distinctive concept of animal welfare in organic agriculture combines naturalness and human care, and can be linked meaningfully with these principles. In practice, a number of challenges are connected with making organic livestock systems work. These challenges are particularly dominant in immature agro-ecological systems, for example those (...)
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  36. Rachel Locke, Samantha Scallan, Camilla Leach & Mark Rickenbach (2013). Identifying Poor Performance Among Doctors in NHS Organizations. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):882-888.score: 78.0
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  37. Geoffrey M. Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & English C. Mike (2011). Stakeholders Understanding of the Concept of Benefit Sharing in Health Research in Kenya: A Qualitative Study. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):20.score: 78.0
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  38. Ben Louie, Steven Kritz, Lawrence S. Brown Jr, Melissa Chu, Charles Madray & Roberto Zavala (2012). Electronic Health Information System at an Opioid Treatment Programme: Roadblocks to Implementation. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (4):734-738.score: 78.0
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  39. N. Sadik (1997). [Reproductive Health: A Challenge for the 21st Century]. Dialogos 33:16-8.score: 78.0
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  40. Christiaan J. Lako, Pauline Rosenau & Chris Daw (2011). Switching Health Insurance Plans: Results From a Health Survey. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (4):312-328.score: 72.0
    The study is designed to provide an informal summary of what is known about consumer switching of health insurance plans and to contribute to knowledge about what motivates consumers who choose to switch health plans. Do consumers switch plans largely on the basis of critical reflection and assessment of information about the quality, and price? The literature suggests that switching is complicated, not always possible, and often overwhelming to consumers. Price does not always determine choice. Quality is very (...)
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  41. Aviad Raz, Isabella Jordan & Silke Schicktanz (2012). Exploring the Positions of German and Israeli Patient Organizations in the Bioethical Context of End-of-Life Policies. Health Care Analysis (2):1-17.score: 72.0
    Patient organizations are increasingly involved in national and international bioethical debates and health policy deliberations. In order to examine how and to what extent cultural factors and organizational contexts influence the positions of patient organizations, this study compares the positions of German and Israeli patient organizations (POs) on issues related to end-of-life medical care. We draw on a qualitative pilot study of thirteen POs, using as a unit of analysis pairs comprised of one German PO and (...)
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  42. Elmar H. Frangenberg (2011). A Good Samaritan Inspired Foundation for a Fair Health Care System. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):73-79.score: 72.0
    Distributive justice on the income and on the service aspects is the most vexing modern day problem for the creation and maintenance of an all inclusive health care system. A pervasive problem of all current schemes is the lack of effective cost control, which continues to result in increasing burdens for all public and private stakeholders. This proposal posits that the responsibility and financial obligation to achieve an ideal outcome of equal and affordable access and benefits for all (...)
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  43. Fuat S. Oduncu (2013). Priority-Setting, Rationing and Cost-Effectiveness in the German Health Care System. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):327-339.score: 72.0
    Germany has just started a public debate on priority-setting, rationing and cost-effectiveness due to the cost explosion within the German health care system. To date, the costs for German health care run at 11,6 % of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP, 278,3 billion €) that represents a significant increase from the 5,9 % levels present in 1970. In response, the German Parliament has enacted several major and minor legal reforms over the last three decades for the sake of (...)
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  44. Nicky Priaulx (2004). That's One Heck of an “Unruly Horse” Riding Roughshod Overr Autonomy in Wrongful Conception. Feminist Legal Studies 12 (3):317-331.score: 72.0
    The case of Rees v. Darlington Memorial Hospital N.H.S. Trustarises from a lower court backlash against the a prior decision of the British House of Lords in McFarlane v. Tayside Health Board. McFarlane holding that healthy children brought about by negligence in family planning procedures are blessings, and parents should therefore be denied the costs of child maintenance. But, would the House agree with the Court of Appeal in Reesthat the factual variation in that case of a disabled (...)
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  45. Maude Laliberté, Matthew Hunt, Bryn Williams-Jones & Debbie Ehrmann Feldman (2013). Health Care Professionals and Bedbugs: An Ethical Analysis of a Resurgent Scourge. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (3):245-255.score: 70.0
    Many health care professionals (HCPs) are understandably reluctant to treat patients in environments infested with bedbugs, in part due to the risk of themselves becoming bedbug vectors to their own homes and workplaces. However, bedbugs are increasingly widespread in care settings, such as nursing homes, as well as in private homes visited by HCPs, leading to increased questions of how health care organizations and their staff ought to respond. This situation is associated with a range of ethical (...)
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  46. Hannele Kerosuo (2004). Examining Boundaries In Health Care - Outline Of A Method For Studying Organizational Boundaries In Interaction. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 6 (1):35-60.score: 70.0
    The care of patients with many illnesses often appears fragmented by many boundaries in the health care system when the care is provided in several locations of primary and secondary care. In the article, boundaries are examined in an interaction between patients and multiple providers in an effort to develop collaboration in inter-organizational provision in a Change Laboratory intervention. Firstly, it will be traced how the boundaries are expressed in the interaction. Secondly, it will be studied how the boundaries (...)
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  47. Kenneth A. Richman & Andrew E. Budson (2000). Health of Organisms and Health of Persons: An Embedded Instrumentalist Approach. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (4):339-354.score: 68.7
    In a time when we as a society are in the process of deciding what our basic rights to health care are, it is critically important for us to have a full and complete understanding of what constitutes health. We argue for an analysis of health according to which certain states are healthy not in themselves but because they allow an individual to reach actual goals. Recognizing that the goals of an individual considered from the point of (...)
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  48. Lisa Fuller (forthcoming). International NGO Health Programs in a Non-Ideal World: Imperialism, Respect & Procedural Justice. In E. Emanuel J. Millum (ed.), Global Justice and Bioethics. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Many people in the developing world access essential health services either partially or primarily through programs run by international non-governmental organizations (INGOs). Given that such programs are typically designed and run by Westerners, and funded by Western countries and their citizens, it is not surprising that such programs are regarded by many as vehicles for Western cultural imperialism. In this chapter, I consider this phenomenon as it emerges in the context of development and humanitarian aid programs, particularly those (...)
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  49. Desh Raj Sirswal (2013). MENTAL HEALTH IN INDIA: POLICIES AND ISSUES. Milestone Education Review 4 (02):35-54.score: 66.0
    Mental health generally refers to an individual’s thoughts, feelings and actions, particularly when he faced with life challenges and stresses. A good mental health isn’t just the absence of mental health problems. It is the achievement and the maintenance of psychological well-being. Mental Health is the state of one’s peace of mind, happiness and harmony brought out by one’s level of adjustment with himself and his environment. In describing mental health, Anwar said, “…mental (...) is the health of one’s mind which can prove a potent determinant of one’s integrated personality and balanced behavour identified on the basis of the level of his adjustment to himself, others and with the environment. A mentally healthy individual possesses a number of characteristics which influence his life positively and help him in achieving his goals of life effectively. He has adequate ability to make adjustments in the changed circumstances and situations. His intellectual powers are adequately developed. He is able to think independently and take proper decision at the proper time. He tries to accomplish his work as effectively as possible but he does not prove to be an extremist by becoming a perfectionist. Though these characteristics are expected from a mentally healthy individual, but these should be taken as essential and necessary conditions for the maintenance of proper mental health and thus absence of one or the other characteristic does not necessarily mean negation of mental health. Good mental health is not just the absence of mental problems. Being mentally healthy is much more than free of depression, anxiety or other psychological issues.”1 In this paper an attempt is made to discuss about the mental health policies and issues in India. (shrink)
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  50. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 66.0
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the (...)
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