Search results for 'Health Policy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nikola Biller-Andorno, Reidar K. Lie & Ruud Ter Meulen (2002). Evidence-Based Medicine as an Instrument for Rational Health Policy. Health Care Analysis 10 (3):261-275.score: 93.0
    This article tries to present a broad view on the values and ethicalissues that are at stake in efforts to rationalize health policy on thebasis of economic evaluations (like cost-effectiveness analysis) andrandomly controlled clinical trials. Though such a rationalization isgenerally seen as an objective and `value free' process, moral valuesoften play a hidden role, not only in the production of `evidence', butalso in the way this evidence is used in policy making. For example, thedefinition of effectiveness of (...)
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  2. Federica Russo (2012). Public Health Policy, Evidence, and Causation: Lessons From the Studies on Obesity. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):141-151.score: 93.0
    The paper addresses the question of how different types of evidence ought to inform public health policy. By analysing case studies on obesity, the paper draws lessons about the different roles that different types of evidence play in setting up public health policies. More specifically, it is argued that evidence of difference-making supports considerations about ‘what works for whom in what circumstances’, and that evidence of mechanisms provides information about the ‘causal pathways’ to intervene upon.
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  3. Christiaan J. Lako & Pauline Rosenau (2009). Demand-Driven Care and Hospital Choice. Dutch Health Policy Toward Demand-Driven Care: Results From a Survey Into Hospital Choice. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 17 (1):20-35.score: 93.0
    In the Netherlands, current policy opinion emphasizes demand-driven health care. Central to this model is the view, advocated by some Dutch health policy makers, that patients should be encouraged to be aware of and make use of health quality and health outcomes information in making personal health care provider choices. The success of the new health care system in the Netherlands is premised on this being the case. After a literature review and (...)
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  4. Caroline Mullen (2008). Representation or Reason: Consulting the Public on the Ethics of Health Policy. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):397-409.score: 93.0
    Consulting the public about the ethical approaches underlying health policies can seem an appealing means of addressing concerns about limited public participation in development of health policy. However ambiguity surrounds questions of whether, or how consultation can really contribute to more defensible decisions about ethical aspects of policy. This paper clarifies the role and limits of public consultation on ethics, beginning by separating different senses of defensibility in decisions on ethics. Defensibility of ethical decisions could be (...)
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  5. Aasim I. Padela (2013). Islamic Verdicts in Health Policy Discourse: Porcine‐Based Vaccines as a Case Study. Zygon 48 (3):655-670.score: 90.0
    In this article, I apply a policy-oriented applied Islamic bioethics lens to two verdicts on the permissibility of using vaccines with porcine components. I begin by reviewing the decrees and then proceed to describe how they were used by health policy stakeholders. Subsequently, My analysis will highlight aspects of the verdict's ethico-legal arguments in order to illustrate salient legal concepts that must be accounted for when using Islamic verdicts as the basis for health policy. I (...)
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  6. Calin Saplacan (2012). On the Reference to Catholic Ethical Theology in Contemporary Health Policy. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):129-147.score: 90.0
    Reference to theology, and in particular to theological ethics, in health policy in contemporary Romania may seem outdated. Some positions have been defended that tend to marginalize the contribution of theology to health policy ethics or ever to rule out any contribution of theology to the implementation of health policies. The questions I aim to answer in this paper are the following: (1) Why has the role of theology (theological ethics) decreased in establishing health (...)
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  7. Mieke L. Van Driel, Robert Vander Stichele, Jan De Maeseneer, An De Sutter & Thierry Christiaens (2007). Medical Evidence and Health Policy: A Marriage of Convenience? The Case of Proton Pump Inhibitors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):674-680.score: 81.0
    Rationale In Belgium, several policies regulating reimbursement of acid suppressant drugs and evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice were issued in a short period of time, creating a unique opportunity to observe their effect on prescribing. Aims and objectives To describe the evolution of prescriptions for acid suppressants and explore the interaction of policies and practice recommendations with prescribing patterns. Method Monthly claims-based data for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and H-2-antihistamines by general practitioners, internists and "astroenterologists were obtained from the Belgian (...)
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  8. Paul Joyce, Ruth Boaden & Aneez Esmail (2005). Managing Risk: A Taxonomy of Error in Health Policy. Health Care Analysis 13 (4):337-346.score: 78.0
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  9. Nuala Kenny & Mita Giacomini (2005). Wanted: A New Ethics Field for Health Policy Analysis. Health Care Analysis 13 (4):247-260.score: 78.0
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  10. Leah M. McClimans, Michael Dunn & Anne‐Marie Slowther (2011). Health Policy, Patient‐Centred Care and Clinical Ethics. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):913-919.score: 75.0
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  11. Eleanor Brooks & Robert Geyer (2012). From DTCA‐PD to Patient Information to Health Information: The Complex Politics and Semantics of EU Health Policy. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (6):1235-1240.score: 75.0
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  12. Tom Noseworthy & Mamoru Watanabe (1999). Health Policy Directions for Evidence‐Based Decision Making in Canada. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 5 (2):227-242.score: 75.0
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  13. David Barling (2007). Food Supply Chain Governance and Public Health Externalities: Upstream Policy Interventions and the UK State. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (3):285-300.score: 72.0
    Contemporary food supply chains are generating externalities with high economic and social costs, notably in public health terms through the rise in diet-related non-communicable disease. The UK State is developing policy strategies to tackle these public health problems alongside intergovernmental responses. However, the governance of food supply chains is conducted by, and across, both private and public spheres and within a multilevel framework. The realities of contemporary food governance are that private interests are key drivers of food (...)
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  14. Afschin Gandjour & Karl Wilhelm Lauterbach (2003). Utilitarian Theories Reconsidered: Common Misconceptions, More Recent Developments, and Health Policy Implications. Health Care Analysis 11 (3):229-244.score: 69.0
    Despite the prevalence of the terms utilitarianism and utilitarian in the health care and health policy literature, anecdotal evidence suggests that authors are often not fully aware of the diversity of utilitarian theories, their principles, and implications. Further, it seems that authors often categorically reject utilitarianism under the assumption that it violates individual rights. The tendency of act utilitarianism to neglect individual rights is attenuated, however, by the diminishing marginal utility of wealth and the disutility of a (...)
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  15. Andrew Gunstone (2008). Reconciliation and Australian Indigenous Health in the 1990s: A Failure of Public Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):251-263.score: 66.0
    In 1991, the Australian Commonwealth Parliament unanimously passed the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation Act 1991. This Act implemented a 10-year process that aimed to reconcile Indigenous and non-Indigenous people by the end of 2000. One of the highest priorities of the reconciliation process was to address Indigenous socio-economic disadvantage, including health, education and housing. However, despite this prioritising, both the Keating Government (1991–1996) and the Howard Government (1996–2000) failed to substantially improve socio-economic outcomes for Indigenous people over the reconciliation (...)
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  16. M. Walton & E. Mengwasser (2012). An Ethical Evaluation of Evidence: A Stewardship Approach to Public Health Policy. Public Health Ethics 5 (1):16-21.score: 63.0
    This article aims to contribute to the application of ethical frameworks to public health policy. In particular, the article considers the use of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics stewardship model, as an applied framework for the evaluation of evidence within public health policymaking. The ‘Stewardship framework’ was applied to a policy proposal to restrict marketing of food and beverages to children. Reflections on applying the stewardship model as a framework are provided. The article concludes that the (...)
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  17. R. Pierce (2011). The Expressive Function of Public Health Policy: The Case of Pandemic Planning. Public Health Ethics 4 (1):53-62.score: 63.0
    Many legal scholars well recognize that, in some instances, support for a law or policy may be primarily because of its expressive function, i.e. the statements it makes about underlying values. In these cases, the expressive content of a law or policy may actually overshadow its central purpose. Examples of this phenomenon, according to Cass Sunstein, include, for example, regulations against hate speech in the USA. He suggests that achieving the consequence (prohibiting hateful speech against certain groups) may (...)
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  18. J. Wilson (2011). Why It's Time to Stop Worrying About Paternalism in Health Policy. Public Health Ethics 4 (3):269-279.score: 61.0
    Public health policies which involve active intervention to improve the health of the population are often criticized as paternalistic. This article argues that it is a mistake to frame our discussions of public health policies in terms of paternalism. First, it is deeply problematic to pick out which policies should count as paternalistic; at best, we can talk about paternalistic justifications for policies. Second, two of the elements that make paternalism problematic at an individual level—interference with liberty (...)
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  19. Shlomi Segall (2010). Is Health (Really) Special? Health Policy Between Rawlsian and Luck Egalitarian Justice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (4):344-358.score: 60.0
    In recent work, Norman Daniels extends the application of Rawls's principle of ‘fair equality of opportunity’ from health care to health proper. Crucial to that account is the view that health care, and now also health, is special. Daniels also claims that a rival theory of distributive justice, namely luck egalitarianism (or ‘equal opportunity for welfare’), cannot provide an adequate account of justice in health and health care. He argues that the application of that (...)
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  20. Stephen John (2009). Why 'Health' is Not a Central Category for Public Health Policy. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):129-143.score: 60.0
    We normally think that public health policy is an important political activity. In turn, we normally understand the value of public health policy in terms of the promotion of health or some health-related good (such as opportunity for health), on the basis of the assumption that health is an important constituent or determinant of wellbeing. In this paper, I argue that the assumption that the value of public health policy should (...)
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  21. J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (2012). Between Reason and Coercion: Ethically Permissible Influence in Health Care and Health Policy Contexts. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (4):345-366.score: 60.0
    In bioethics, the predominant categorization of various types of influence has been a tripartite classification of rational persuasion (meaning influence by reason and argument), coercion (meaning influence by irresistible threats—or on a few accounts, offers), and manipulation (meaning everything in between). The standard ethical analysis in bioethics has been that rational persuasion is always permissible, and coercion is almost always impermissible save a few cases such as imminent threat to self or others. However, many forms of influence fall into the (...)
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  22. Madison Powers & Ruth Faden (2008). Social Justice: The Moral Foundations of Public Health and Health Policy. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    In bioethics, discussions of justice have tended to focus on questions of fairness in access to health care: is there a right to medical treatment, and how should priorities be set when medical resources are scarce. But health care is only one of many factors that determine the extent to which people live healthy lives, and fairness is not the only consideration in determining whether a health policy is just. In this pathbreaking book, senior bioethicists Powers (...)
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  23. Sheila Wildeman (2013). Protecting Rights and Building Capacities: Challenges to Global Mental Health Policy in Light of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):48-73.score: 60.0
    The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified mental health as a priority for global health promotion and international development to be targeted through promulgation of evidence-based medical practices, health systems reform, and respect for human rights. Yet these overlapping strategies are marked by tensions as the historical primacy of expert-led initiatives is increasingly subject to challenge by new social movements — in particular, disabled persons' organizations (DPOs). These tensions come into focus upon situating the WHO's mental (...)
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  24. Angus Dawson (2005). Risk Perceptions and Ethical Public Health Policy: MMR Vaccination in the UK. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (4):229-241.score: 60.0
    This paper is concerned with how public health policy makers should respond to the public’s perception of risks. I suggest that we can think of this issue in terms of two different models of responding to the public’s view of such perceived risks. The first model I will call the public perception view (PP view) and the second the public good view (PG view). The PP view suggests that the public’s perception of any risks is so important that (...)
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  25. Patricia J. Arnold & Terrie C. Reeves (2006). International Trade and Health Policy: Implications of the GATS for US Healthcare Reform. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):313 - 332.score: 60.0
    This paper examines the implications of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), the World Trade Organization’s agreement governing trade in health-related services, for health policy and healthcare reform in the United States. The paper describes the nature and scope of US obligations under the GATS, the ways in which the trade agreement intersects with domestic health policy, and the institutional factors that mediate trade-offs between health and trade policy. The analysis suggests (...)
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  26. Meri Koivusalo (2010). Common Health Policy Interests and the Shaping of Global Pharmaceutical Policies. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (4):395-414.score: 60.0
    In order to achieve more ethical global health outcomes, health policies must be driven by health priorities and should take into account broader health policy requirements, including the needs of specific national health systems. It is thus important to recognize that the division of interests in key policy areas are not necessarily between the priorities of rich and poor countries, but between (1) pharmaceutical industry interests and health policy interests, and (2) (...)
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  27. William M. Sage (2010). Will Embryonic Stem Cells Change Health Policy? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):342-351.score: 60.0
    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health (...)
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  28. Marc Lappé (1983). Values and Public Health: Value Considerations in Setting Health Policy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 4 (1).score: 60.0
    This paper uses six policy problems in public health to illustrate the complexity of value considerations in decision-making, and derives an ethic for health protection policies based on the primacy of non-harming. In the first part, health policy is shown to require value considerations beyond simple utilitarianism. In the second, the author posits that much of health impairment can be traced to erosions of health outside the immediate control and consent of the individual. (...)
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  29. G. Anderson & M. V. Rorty (2001). Key Points for Developing an International Declaration on Nursing, Human Rights, Human Genetics and Public Health Policy. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):259-271.score: 60.0
    Human rights legislation pertaining to applications of human genetic science is still lacking at an international level. Three international human rights documents now serve as guidelines for countries wishing to develop such legislation. These were drafted and adopted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the Human Genome Organization, and the Council of Europe. It is critically important that the international nursing community makes known its philosophy and practice-based knowledge relating to ethics and human rights, and contributes to (...)
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  30. Audrey R. Chapman (2008). Book Review of Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing and Delivery of Health Care in America by Donald A. Barr. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):9.score: 60.0
    Donald A. Barr's Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing, and Delivery of Health Care in America (second edition, 2007) offers a lucid and informative overview of the U.S. health system and the dilemmas policy makers currently face. Barr has provided a balanced introduction to the way health care is organized, financed, and delivered in the United States. The thirteen chapters of the book are quite comprehensive in the topics they cover. Even those (...)
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  31. G. Trotter (2008). The Illusion of Legitimacy: Two Assumptions That Corrupt Health Policy Deliberation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (5):445-460.score: 60.0
    Public deliberation about health policy in the United States often hinges on two untenable basic assumptions about political legitimacy. The first assumption, common in public debate throughout the United States, is that federal oversight of health care is justified under a federal compact binding all citizens. This assumption is false because the federal compact precludes such oversight. Indeed, the ascendancy of national government (and demise of federalism) over the past 70 years was engineered through the subversion of (...)
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  32. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2003). Towards a Suicide Free Society: Identify Suicide Prevention as Public Health Policy. Mens Sana Monographs 1 (2):3.score: 60.0
    Suicide is amongst the top ten causes of death for all age groups in most countries of the world. It is the second most important cause of death in the younger age group (15-19 yrs.) , second only to vehicular accidents. Attempted suicides are ten times the successful suicide figures, and 1-2% attempted suicides become successful suicides every year. Male sex, widowhood, single or divorced marital status, addiction to alcohol ordrugs, concomitant chronic physical or mental illness, past suicidal attempt, adverse (...)
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  33. Janet Wallcraft (2011). The Person in Health Care Policy Development. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (2):347-349.score: 60.0
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  34. Margot Félix‐Bortolotti (2011). Part 2 – Primary Health Care Workforce Policy Intricacies: Multidisciplinary Team1 Case Analysis. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (2):400-404.score: 60.0
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  35. Meredith C. Schwartz (2009). Trust and Responsibility in Health Policy. Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (2):116-133.score: 58.0
    Discussions of both personal responsibility and the importance of trust in health-care settings are increasingly prominent in the bioethics literature. In this paper I link the two discussions and argue that health policies that include personal responsibility ought to address climates of social trust. Trust is a social good that is not always fairly distributed. Disadvantaged social groups often face default distrust. I suggest that agent-centered models in which responsibilities are negotiated do a better job of repairing social (...)
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  36. Michael McCubbin & David Cohen (1999). A Systemic and Value-Based Approach to Strategic Reform of the Mental Health System. Health Care Analysis 7 (1):57-77.score: 57.0
    Most writers now recognize that mental health policy and the mental health system are extremely resistant to real changes that reflect genuine biopsychosocial paradigms of mental disorder. Writers bemoaning the intransigence of the mental health system tend to focus on a small analytical level, only to find themselves mired in the rationalities of the existing system. Problems are acknowledged to be system-wide, yet few writers have used a method of analysis appropriate for systemic problems. Drawing upon (...)
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  37. David B. Resnik (forthcoming). Food and Beverage Policies and Public Health Ethics. Health Care Analysis:1-12.score: 57.0
    Government food and beverage policies can play an important role in promoting public health. Few people would question this assumption. Difficult questions can arise, however, when policymakers, public health officials, citizens, and businesses deliberate about food and beverage policies, because competing values may be at stake, such as public health, individual autonomy, personal responsibility, economic prosperity, and fairness. An ethically justified policy strikes a reasonable among competing values by meeting the following criteria: (1) the policy (...)
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  38. Shawn H. E. Harmon (2006). Solidarity: A (New) Ethic for Global Health Policy. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 14 (4):215-236.score: 57.0
    This article explores solidarity as an ethical concept underpinning rules in the global health context. First, it considers the theoretical conceptualisation of the value and some specific duties it supports (ie: its expression in the broadest sense and its derivative action-guiding duties). Second, it considers the manifestation of solidarity in two international regulatory instruments. It concludes that, although solidarity is represented in these instruments, it is often incidental. This fact, their emphasis on other values and their internal weaknesses diminishes (...)
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  39. Adam Oliver (2010). Reflections on the Development of Health Inequalities Policy in England. Health Care Analysis 18 (4):402-420.score: 57.0
    s are written to summarise documents and to whet the reader’s interest. Alas, many readers just use them as a substitute for reading the whole paper, which given the brevity of abstracts can give a somewhat distorted impression. I hope that having read this abstract, you will read on. If you do, you will find that I offer a little personal history and a little impersonal history on the development of interest in the issue of health inequalities in England. (...)
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  40. David E. Hayes-Bautista (1992). The Intellectual Basis for Latino AIDS Policy: Towards the Humanities and Health Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 13 (4):235-246.score: 57.0
    The AIDS epidemic touches upon basic humanities themes: sex, death and social worth, to name just three. AIDS policy in general builds upon society's discourse on these topics. The growing Latino population (25% of California and Texas) needs an AIDS policy that builds upon the Latino humanities tradition. The contours of the Latino intellectual tradition, as focused on issues attendant to health, are presented, with examples from Aztec, colonial and modern times.
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  41. Norman Daniels (2008). Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    In this new book by the award-winning author of Just Healthcare, Norman Daniels develops a comprehensive theory of justice for health that answers three key questions: What is the special moral importance of health? When are health inequalities unjust? How can we meet health needs fairly when we cannot meet them all? The theory has implications for national and global health policy: Can we meet health needs fairly in aging societies? Or protect (...) in the workplace while respecting individual liberty? Or meet professional obligations and obligations of justice without conflict? (shrink)
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  42. Alan Cribb (2005). Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    What is health policy for? In Health and the Good Society, Alan Cribb addresses this question in a way that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. His core argument is that biomedical ethics should draw upon public health values and ethics; specifically, he argues that everybody has some share of responsibility for health, including a responsibility for promoting greater health equality. In the process, Cribb argues for a major rethink of the whole project of health (...)
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  43. Attila Tanyi & Zsofia Kollanyi (2008). Egészségpolitika és etika (Health Policy and Ethics). DEMOS Studies, DEMOS Hungary.score: 54.0
    This book provides a survey of the ethical aspects of health care resources distribution. It first distinguishes health from health care in an effort to clear up the ethical landscape. After this, still with the same purpose, it makes a distinction between problems of macro-allocation and micro-allocation. In the rest of the book two questions of macro-allocation are treated in some detail. First, several approaches – in particular: utilitarian, egalitarian, communitarian, and libertarian – to the question whether (...)
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  44. Jan Deckers (2010). What Policy Should Be Adopted to Curtail the Negative Global Health Impacts Associated with the Consumption of Farmed Animal Products? [REVIEW] Res Publica 16 (1):57-72.score: 54.0
    The negative global health impacts (GHIs) associated with the consumption of farmed animal products are wide-ranging and morally significant. This paper considers four options that policy-makers might adopt to curtail the negative GHIs associated with the consumption of farmed animal products. These options are: 1. to introduce a ban on the consumption of farmed animal products; 2. to increase the costs of farmed animal products; 3. to educate people about the negative GHIs associated with the consumption of farmed (...)
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  45. Catherine L. Mah & Carol Timmings (forthcoming). Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level. Public Health Ethics:phu011.score: 54.0
    Menu labelling is a public health policy intervention that applies principles of nutrition labelling to the eating out environment. While menu labelling has received a good deal of attention with regard to its effectiveness in shaping food choices for obesity prevention, its premises have not yet been fully explored in terms of its broader applications to social equity and population health. In the following case, we focus on the example of menu labelling within the context of food (...)
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  46. Heather J. Carmack, Benjamin R. Bates & Lynn M. Harter (2008). Narrative Constructions of Health Care Issues and Policies: The Case of President Clinton's Apology-by-Proxy for the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (2):89-109.score: 54.0
    The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment (TSE) has shaped African Americans’ views of the American health care system, contributing to a reluctance to participate in biomedical research and a suspicion of the medical system. This essay examines public discourses surrounding President Clinton’s attempt to restore African Americans’ trust by apologizing for the TSE. Through a narrative reading, we illustrate the failure of this text as an attempt to reconcile the United States Public Health Service and the African American public. We (...)
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  47. Kirsty Johnston (2010). Grafting Orchids and Ugly: Theatre, Disability and Arts-Based Health Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (4):279-294.score: 54.0
    Theatre-based health policy research is an emerging field, and this article investigates the work of one of its leaders. In 2005, prominent medical geneticist and playwright Jeff Nisker and his collaborators produced Orchids, his play concerning pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, to research theatre as a tool for engaging citizens in health policy development. Juxtaposing Orchids with a concurrent disability theatre production in Vancouver entitled Ugly, I argue that disability theatre suggests important means for building inclusiveness in this (...)
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  48. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2004). The Goal : Health for All-the Commitment : All for Health. Mens Sana Monographs 2 (1):97.score: 54.0
    Primary Health Care was the means by which Health for All by the Year 2000 AD was to be achieved. And Health for All was possible only if All were mobilised for Health. This meant not just governments and medical establishments, but people themselves. Primary health care is essentially health care made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community by means acceptable to them, through their full participation and at a cost the (...)
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  49. Claudia Wild (2005). Ethics of Resource Allocation: Instruments for Rational Decision Making in Support of a Sustainable Health Care. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (4):296-309.score: 52.0
    Objective: In all western countries health care budgets are under considerable constraint and therefore a reflection process has started on how to gain the most health benefit for the population within limited resource boundaries. The field of ethics of resource allocation has evolved only recently in order to bring some objectivity and rationality in the discussion. In this article it is argued that priority setting is the prerequisite of ethical resource allocation and that for purposes of operationalization, instruments (...)
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  50. Meri Koivusalo (2006). The Impact of Economic Globalisation on Health. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (1):13-34.score: 52.0
    The analysis of the impact of economic globalisation on health depends on how it is defined and should consider how it shapes both health and health policies. I first discuss the ways in which economic globalisation can and has been defined and then why it is important to analyse its impact both in terms of health and health policies. I then explore the ways in which economic globalisation influences health and health policies and (...)
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