Search results for 'Health Services Research' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anne Townsend & Susan M. Cox (2013). Accessing Health Services Through the Back Door: A Qualitative Interview Study Investigating Reasons Why People Participate in Health Research in Canada. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):40.score: 157.0
    Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. (...)
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  2. Jennifer Hunter, Katherine Corcoran, Stephen Leeder & Kerryn Phelps (2013). Is It Time to Abandon Paper? The Use of Emails and the Internet for Health Services Research – a Cost‐Effectiveness and Qualitative Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):855-861.score: 150.0
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  3. A. Miles MSc MPhil PhD, P. Bentley Phd Frcp Frcpath, A. Polychronis Mb Chb, J. Grey Phd Mrcp & N. Price Ba (1998). Recent Progress in Health Services Research: On the Need for Evidence‐Based Debate. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (4):257-265.score: 150.0
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  4. Marilyn J. Held PhD & Kathleen N. Lohr PhD (1995). Health Services Research: An Expanding Field of Inquiry. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 1 (1):61-65.score: 118.0
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  5. Eileen P. Anderson‐Fye & Jerry Floersch (2011). “I'm Not Your Typical 'Homework Stresses Me Out' Kind of Girl”: Psychological Anthropology in Research on College Student Usage of Psychiatric Medications and Mental Health Services. Ethos 39 (4):501-521.score: 115.0
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  6. Vickie M. Mays (2012). Research Challenges and Bioethics Responsibilities in the Aftermath of the Presidential Apology to the Survivors of the U. S. Public Health Services Syphilis Study at Tuskegee. Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):419-430.score: 104.7
    In 1997 President Clinton apologized to the survivors of the U.S. Public Health Service Syphilis Study. Since then, two of his recommendations have received little attention. First, he emphasized the need to remember the shameful past so we can build a better future for racial'ethnic minority populations. Second, he directed the creation in partnership with higher education to prepare training materials that would instruct biomedical researchers on the application of ethical principles to research with racial/ethnic minority populations. This (...)
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  7. Sassy Molyneux, Stephen Mulupi, Lairumbi Mbaabu & Vicki Marsh (2012). Benefits and Payments for Research Participants: Experiences and Views From a Research Centre on the Kenyan Coast. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):13-.score: 96.0
    BackgroundThere is general consensus internationally that unfair distribution of the benefits of research is exploitative and should be avoided or reduced. However, what constitutes fair benefits, and the exact nature of the benefits and their mode of provision can be strongly contested. Empirical studies have the potential to contribute viewpoints and experiences to debates and guidelines, but few have been conducted. We conducted a study to support the development of guidelines on benefits and payments for studies conducted by the (...)
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  8. Kathleen N. Lohr (1996). The Role of Research in Setting Priorities for Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2 (1):79-82.score: 96.0
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  9. Geoffrey M. Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & English C. Mike (2011). Stakeholders Understanding of the Concept of Benefit Sharing in Health Research in Kenya: A Qualitative Study. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):20.score: 94.0
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  10. Maria W. Merritt (2011). Health Researchers' Ancillary Care Obligations in Low-Resource Settings: How Can We Tell What is Morally Required? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (4):311-347.score: 90.0
    Health researchers working in low-resource settings routinely encounter serious unmet health needs for which research participants have, at best, limited treatment options through the local health system (Taylor, Merritt, and Mullany 2011). A recent case discussion features a study conducted in Bamako, Mali (Dickert and Wendler 2009). The study objective was to see whether children with severe malaria develop pulmonary hypertension in order to improve the general understanding of morbidity and mortality associated with malaria. In the (...)
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  11. J. Cassell (2002). Why We Should Not Seek Individual Informed Consent for Participation in Health Services Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):313-317.score: 90.0
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  12. Daniel A. Albert (1997). Health Services Research and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Reciprocal Relationship. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 41 (3):327-340.score: 90.0
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  13. M. J. Field & K. N. Lohr (1995). Health Services Research: An Expanding Field of Inquiry. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 1 (1):61.score: 90.0
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  14. Steven C. Hill, Samuel H. Zuvekas & Marc W. Zodet (2011). Implications of the Accuracy of MEPS Prescription Drug Data for Health Services Research. Inquiry 48 (3):242-259.score: 90.0
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  15. Sandra J. Tanenbaum (2011). Mental Health Consumer-Operated Services Organizations in the US: Citizenship as a Core Function and Strategy for Growth. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (2):192-205.score: 90.0
    Consumer-operated services organizations (COSOs) are independent, non-profit organizations that provide peer support and other non-clinical services to seriously mentally ill people. Mental health consumers provide many of these services and make up at least a majority of the organization’s leadership. Although the dominant conception of the COSO is as an adjunct to clinical care in the public mental health system, this paper reconceives the organization as a civic association and thereby a locus of citizenship. Drawing (...)
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  16. Miriam Bentwich (2012). It's About Scientific Secrecy, Dummy: A Better Equilibrium Among Genomics Patenting, Scientific Research and Health Care. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):263-284.score: 87.0
    This paper offers a different pragmatic and patent-based approach to concerns regarding the negative effects of genetic-based patenting on advancing scientific research and providing adequate and accessible health care services. At the basis of this approach lies an explication of a mandatory provisional patented paper procedure (PPPA), designed for genetic-based patents and administered by leading scientific journals in the field, while officially acknowledged by the USPTO, and subsequently by other patent offices as well. It is argued that (...)
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  17. Enric J. Novella (2008). Theoretical Accounts on Deinstitutionalization and the Reform of Mental Health Services: A Critical Review. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):303-314.score: 87.0
    This article offers a comprehensive critical review of the most popular theoretical accounts on the recent processes of deinstitutionalization and reform of mental health services and their possible underlying factors, focusing in the sharp contrast between the straightforward ideas and models maintained by mainstream psychiatry and the different interpretations delivered by authors coming from the social sciences or applying conceptual tools stemming from diverse social theories. Since all these appraisals tend to illuminate only some aspects of the process (...)
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  18. Peter Allmark (2005). Bayes and Health Care Research. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):321-332.score: 83.0
    Bayes’ rule shows how one might rationally change one’s beliefs in the light of evidence. It is the foundation of a statistical method called Bayesianism. In health care research, Bayesianism has its advocates but the dominant statistical method is frequentism. There are at least two important philosophical differences between these methods. First, Bayesianism takes a subjectivist view of probability (i.e. that probability scores are statements of subjective belief, not objective fact) whilst frequentism takes an objectivist view. Second, Bayesianism (...)
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  19. Norman Daniels (1985). Just Health Care. Cambridge University Press.score: 81.0
    How should medical services be distributed within society? Who should pay for them? Is it right that large amounts should be spent on sophisticated new technology and expensive operations, or would the resources be better employed in, for instance, less costly preventive measures? These and others are the questions addreses in this book. Norman Daniels examines some of the dilemmas thrown up by conflicting demands for medical attention, and goes on to advance a theory of justice in the distribution (...)
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  20. A. M. Slowther, L. McClimans & C. Price (2012). Development of Clinical Ethics Services in the UK: A National Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (4):210-214.score: 81.0
    Background In 2001 a report on the provision of clinical ethics support in UK healthcare institutions identified 20 clinical ethics committees. Since then there has been no systematic evaluation or documentation of their work at a national level. Recent national surveys of clinical ethics services in other countries have identified wide variation in practice and scope of activities. Objective To describe the current provision of ethics support in the UK and its development since 2001. Method A postal/electronic questionnaire survey (...)
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  21. Michael Calnan, David Wainwright, Peter Glasner, Ruth Newbury-Ecob & Ewan Ferlie (2006). 'Medicine's Next Goldmine?' The Implications of New Genetic Health Technologies for the Health Service. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):33-41.score: 80.0
    There is considerable uncertainty about the implications of the new genetics for health services. These are the enthusiasts who argue that molecular genetics will transform health care and others argue that the scope for genetic interventions is limited. The aim of this paper is to examine some of the questions, tensions and difficulties which face health care providers particularly in developed countries as they try to come to terms with the dilemmas raised by new genetic (...) care technologies (NGHTs). It identifies questions for research which may help the development of robust and flexible strategies for implementation. (shrink)
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  22. L. S. Gittner, M. J. Roach, G. Kikano, S. Grey & N. V. Dawson (2011). Health Service Research: The Square Peg in Human Subjects Protection Regulations. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):118-122.score: 77.3
    Protection of human participants is a fundamental facet of biomedical research. We report the activities of a health service research study in which there were three institutional review boards (IRBs), three legal departments and one research administration department providing recommendations and mandating changes in the study methods. Complying with IRB requirements can be challenging, but can also adversely affect study outcomes. Multiple protocol changes mandated from multiple IRBs created a research method that was not reflective (...)
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  23. Steven P. Wainwright & Angus Forbes (2000). Philosophical Problems with Social Research on Health Inequalities. Health Care Analysis 8 (3):259-277.score: 77.0
    This paper offers a realist critique of socialresearch on health inequalities. A conspectus of thefield of health inequalities research identifies twomain research approaches: the positivist quantitativesurvey and the interpretivist qualitative `casestudy'. We argue that both approaches suffer fromserious philosophical limitations. We suggest that aturn to realism offers a productive `third way' bothfor the development of health inequality research inparticular and for the social scientific understandingof the complexities of the social world in general.
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  24. Janet Borgerson (2005). Addressing the 'Global Basic Structure' in the Ethics of International Health Research Involving Human Subjects. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:235-249.score: 75.0
    The context of international health research involving human subjects, and this should appear obvious, is the human community. As such, basic questions of how human beings should be treated by other human beings, particularly in situations of unequal power – e.g., in the form of control, choice, or opportunity – lay at the foundations of related ethical discourse when ethics are discussed at all. I trace a narrative that follows upon a recent revision process of international guidelines for (...)
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  25. Linda Neuhauser, Dawn Richardson, Sonja Mackenzie & Meredith Minkler (2007). Advancing Transdisciplinary and Translational Research Practice: Issues and Models of Doctoral Education in Public Health. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M19.score: 75.0
    Finding solutions to complex health problems, such as obesity, violence, and climate change, will require radical changes in cross-disciplinary education, research, and practice. The fundamental determinants of health include many interrelated factors such as poverty, culture, education, environment, and government policies. However, traditional public health training has tended to focus more narrowly on diseases and risk factors, and has not adequately leveraged the rich contributions of sociology, anthropology, economics, geography, communication, political science, and other disciplines. Further, (...)
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  26. Mary Boulton, Ray Fitzpatrick & Clare Swinburn (1996). Qualitative Research in Health Care: II. A Structured Review and Evaluation of Studies. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2 (3):171-179.score: 74.7
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  27. Bridget Pratt & Bebe Loff (2013). A Framework to Link International Clinical Research to the Promotion of Justice in Global Health. Bioethics 27 (3):n/a-n/a.score: 74.0
    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. Theories of justice from political philosophy establish obligations for parties from high-income countries owed to parties from low and middle-income countries. We have developed a new framework that is based on Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm to strengthen the link between international clinical research and justice in global health. The ‘research for health justice’ framework provides direction (...)
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  28. Kirsty Johnston (2010). Grafting Orchids and Ugly: Theatre, Disability and Arts-Based Health Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (4):279-294.score: 74.0
    Theatre-based health policy research is an emerging field, and this article investigates the work of one of its leaders. In 2005, prominent medical geneticist and playwright Jeff Nisker and his collaborators produced Orchids, his play concerning pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, to research theatre as a tool for engaging citizens in health policy development. Juxtaposing Orchids with a concurrent disability theatre production in Vancouver entitled Ugly, I argue that disability theatre suggests important means for building inclusiveness in this (...)
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  29. John D. Pringle & Donald C. Cole (2009). Health Research in Complex Emergencies: A Humanitarian Imperative. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):115-123.score: 73.3
    Health researchers, research trainees, and ethics reviewers should be prepared for the special application of research ethics within complex humanitarian emergencies. This paper argues that as a precursor to published ethical guidelines for conducting research in complex emergencies, researchers and research ethics committees should observe the following primary ethical considerations: (1) the research is not at the expense of humanitarian action; (2) the research is justified in that it is needs-driven and relevant to (...)
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  30. Patricia A. Marshall (2005). Human Rights,Cultural Pluralism, and International Health Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):529-557.score: 72.0
    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically on (...) research conducted in resource-poor settings. I will demonstrate the potential for addressing human rights considerations in international health research with special attention to the importance of collaborative partnerships, capacity building, and respect for cultural traditions. Strengthening professional knowledge about international research ethics increases awareness of ethical concerns associated with study design and informed consent among researchers working in resource-poor settings. But this is not enough. Technological and financial resources are also necessary to build capacity for local communities to ensure that research results are integrated into existing health systems. Problematic issues surrounding the application of ethical guidelines in resource-poor settings are embedded in social history, cultural context, and the global political economy. Resolving the moral complexities requires a commitment to engaged dialogue and action among investigators, funding agencies, policy makers, governmental institutions, and private industry. (shrink)
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  31. Segun Gbadegesin & David Wendler (2006). Protecting Communities in Health Research From Exploitation. Bioethics 20 (5):248-253.score: 72.0
    Guidelines for health research focus on protecting individual research subjects. It is also vital to protect the communities involved in health research. In particular, a number of studies have been criticized on the grounds that they exploited host communities. The present paper attempts to address these concerns by providing an analysis of community exploitation and, based on this analysis, determining what safeguards are needed to protect communities in health research against exploitation. (edited).
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  32. Mathieu Albert, Suzanne Laberge & Brian Hodges (2009). Boundary-Work in the Health Research Field: Biomedical and Clinician Scientists' Perceptions of Social Science Research. [REVIEW] Minerva 47 (2):171-194.score: 72.0
    Funding agencies in Canada are attempting to break down the organizational boundaries between disciplines to promote interdisciplinary research and foster the integration of the social sciences into the health research field. This paper explores the extent to which biomedical and clinician scientists’ perceptions of social science research operate as a cultural boundary to the inclusion of social scientists into this field. Results indicated that cultural boundaries may impede social scientists’ entry into the health research (...)
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  33. Bridget Pratt & Bebe Loff (2013). Linking International Research to Global Health Equity: The Limited Contribution of Bioethics. Bioethics 27 (4):208-214.score: 72.0
    Health research has been identified as a vehicle for advancing global justice in health. However, in bioethics, issues of global justice are mainly discussed within an ongoing debate on the conditions under which international clinical research is permissible. As a result, current ethical guidance predominantly links one type of international research (biomedical) to advancing one aspect of health equity (access to new treatments). International guidelines largely fail to connect international research to promoting broader (...)
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  34. Chesmal Siriwardhana, Anushka Adikari, Kaushalya Jayaweera & Athula Sumathipala (2013). Ethical Challenges in Mental Health Research Among Internally Displaced People: Ethical Theory and Research Implementation. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):13-.score: 72.0
    Millions of people undergo displacement in the world. Internally displaced people (IDP) are especially vulnerable as they are not protected by special legislation in contrast to other migrants. Research conducted among IDPs must be correspondingly sensitive in dealing with ethical issues that may arise. Muslim IDPs in Puttalam district in the North-Western province of Sri Lanka were initially displaced from Northern Sri Lanka due to the conflict in 1991. In the backdrop of a study exploring the prevalence of common (...)
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  35. Anna C. Mastroianni, Ruth R. Faden & Daniel D. Federman (eds.) (1994). Women and Health Research: Ethical and Legal Issues of Including Women in Clinical Studies. National Academy Press.score: 72.0
    Executive Summary There is a general perception that biomedical research has not given the same attention to the health problems of women that it has given ...
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  36. Annalee Yassi, Jaime Breilh, Shafik Dharamsi, Karen Lockhart & Jerry M. Spiegel (2013). The Ethics of Ethics Reviews in Global Health Research: Case Studies Applying a New Paradigm. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (2):83-101.score: 72.0
    With increasing calls for global health research there is growing concern regarding the ethical challenges encountered by researchers from high-income countries (HICs) working in low or middle-income countries (LMICs). There is a dearth of literature on how to address these challenges in practice. In this article, we conduct a critical analysis of three case studies of research conducted in LMICs. We apply emerging ethical guidelines and principles specific to global health research and offer practical strategies (...)
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  37. David B. Resnik & Darryl C. Zeldin (2008). Environmental Health Research on Hazards in the Home and the Duty to Warn. Bioethics 22 (4):209–217.score: 72.0
    When environmental health researchers study hazards in the home, they often discover information that may be relevant to protecting the health and safety of the research subjects and occupants. This article describes the ethical and legal basis for a duty to warn research subjects and occupants about hazards in the home and explores the extent of this duty. Investigators should inform research subjects and occupants about the results of tests conducted as part of the (...) protocol only if the information is likely to be accurate, reliable, and medically useful. Investigators should warn subjects and occupants about hazards they happen to discover while they are in the home, if a reasonable person would warn the subjects and occupants about those hazards. Investigators should not report illegal hazards discovered in the home to the authorities, unless those hazards constitute abuse or neglect of children or mentally disabled people living in the home. When investigators decide to warn research subjects and occupants about hazards in the home, they should take some steps to help them make effective use of this information, such as providing additional counselling or making a referral for remediation or medical treatment. Investigators should discuss these issues with research subjects during the informed consent process. (shrink)
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  38. Dean M. Harris (2011). Ethics in Health Services and Policy: A Global Approach. Jossey-Bass.score: 71.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction. -- Acknowledgments. -- The Author. -- 1 Ethical Theories and Bioethics in a Global Perspective. -- Theories of Ethics. -- Are Theories of Ethics Global? -- Can Theories of Ethics Encourage People to Do the Right Thing? -- 2 Autonomy and Informed Consent in Global Perspective. -- Ethical Principles and Practical Issues of Informed Consent. -- Does Informed Consent Really Matter to Patients? -- Is Informed Consent a Universal Principle or a Cultural Value? -- 3 (...)
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  39. Nathan M. Gerard (2010). A Diagnosis of Conflict: Theoretical Barriers to Integration in Mental Health Services & Their Philosophical Undercurrents. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):4.score: 71.0
    This paper examines the philosophical substructure to the theoretical conflicts that permeate contemporary mental health care in the UK. Theoretical conflicts are treated here as those that arise among practitioners holding divergent theoretical orientations towards the phenomena being treated. Such conflicts, although steeped in history, have become revitalized by recent attempts at integrating mental health services that have forced diversely trained practitioners to work collaboratively together, often under one roof. Part I of this paper examines how the (...)
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  40. Lillian Lillemoen & Reidar Pedersen (2013). Ethics in Municipal Health Services: Working Systematically with, and Developing Competence in Ethics. Clinical Ethics 8 (1):19-28.score: 71.0
    The Norwegian Parliament has decided to give priority to ethics in municipal health services. This priority is supposed to raise competence in ethics within municipal health services. As part of the national project, the participating municipalities were encouraged to develop and carry out local projects. In this article, we present a local ethics project in one of the participating municipalities in central eastern Norway. The local project for raising competence in ethics was carried out in cooperation (...)
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  41. Valmi D. Sousa & Wilaiporn Rojjanasrirat (2011). Translation, Adaptation and Validation of Instruments or Scales for Use in Cross‐Cultural Health Care Research: A Clear and User‐Friendly Guideline. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (2):268-274.score: 70.0
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  42. Paul J. Barr, James C. McElnay & Carmel M. Hughes (2012). Connected Health Care: The Future of Health Care and the Role of the Pharmacist. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):56-62.score: 69.0
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  43. Richard Byng & Roger Jones (2004). Mental Health Link: The Development and Formative Evaluation of a Complex Intervention to Improve Shared Care for Patients with Long‐Term Mental Illness. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (1):27-36.score: 69.0
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  44. Rachel Davis, Merrillee Briggs, Sonal Arora, Rachel Moss & David Schwappach (2014). Predictors of Health Care Professionals' Attitudes Towards Involvement in Safety‐Relevant Behaviours. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (1):12-19.score: 69.0
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  45. Carmel M. Martin (2011). Distortions, Belief and Sense Making in Complex Adaptive Systems for Health. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (2):387-388.score: 69.0
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  46. Carmel M. Martin (2013). Health Systems Innovation: Addressing the Dynamics of Multilayered 'Complex Bundles' of Knowledge. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (6):1085-1086.score: 69.0
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  47. Carmel M. Martin & Margot Félix‐Bortolotti (2010). W(H)Ither Complexity? The Emperor's New Toolkit? Or Elucidating the Evolution of Health Systems Knowledge? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):415-420.score: 69.0
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  48. Thomas W. Pogge (2005). Human Rights and Global Health: A Research Program. Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):182-209.score: 66.0
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  49. L. Shields (2007). Using Semantic Differentials in Fieldwork. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):116-119.score: 66.0
    Rationale A large project was undertaken to examine attitudes and opinions of health staff and parents about the care of hospitalized children in four countries. A simple scoring system, which allowed comparisons between results from each country, was needed to examine concepts under investigation. Aims and objectives This paper describes how, after trialling a range of methods, semantic differentials (SD) were found to be easy for the subjects to use. They translated well into other languages and provided scores which (...)
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  50. Shivani Uppal, Lindsay G. Oades, Trevor P. Crowe & Frank P. Deane (2010). Barriers to Transfer of Collaborative Recovery Training Into Australian Mental Health Services: Implications for the Development of Evidence‐Based Services. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):451-455.score: 66.0
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