Search results for 'Health care rationing' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Fuat S. Oduncu (2013). Priority-Setting, Rationing and Cost-Effectiveness in the German Health Care System. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):327-339.score: 564.0
    Germany has just started a public debate on priority-setting, rationing and cost-effectiveness due to the cost explosion within the German health care system. To date, the costs for German health care run at 11,6 % of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP, 278,3 billion €) that represents a significant increase from the 5,9 % levels present in 1970. In response, the German Parliament has enacted several major and minor legal reforms over the last three decades for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Rui Nunes & Guilhermina Rego (2013). Priority Setting in Health Care: A Complementary Approach. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-12.score: 435.0
    Explicit forms of rationing have already been implemented in some countries, and many of these prioritization systems resort to Norman Daniels’ “accountability for reasonableness” methodology. However, a question still remains: is “accountability for reasonableness” not only legitimate but also fair? The objective of this paper is to try to adjust “accountability for reasonableness” to the World Health Organization’s holistic view of health and propose an evolutionary perspective in relation to the “normal” functioning standard proposed by Norman Daniels. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Paul Anand (1999). QALYS and the Integration of Claims in Health-Care Rationing. Health Care Analysis 7 (3):239-253.score: 420.0
    The paper argues against the polarisation of the health economics literature into pro- and anti-QALY camps. In particular, we suggest that a crucial distinction should be made between the QALY measure as a metric of health, and QALY maximisation as an applied social choice rule. We argue against the rule but for the measure and that the appropriate conceptualisation of health-care rationing decisions should see the main task as the integration of competing and possibly incommensurable (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Allyson M. Pollock (1995). Paper One: The Politics of Destruction: Rationing in the UK Health Care Market. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 3 (4):299-308.score: 393.0
    Rationing health care is not new. As governments world wide struggle to contain the costs of health care, health policy analysts debate how rationing should be done. However, they too often neglect how the mechanisms for funding and allocating health care resources are themselves vehicles for rationing treatment. In the UK, where health care rationing debates currently abound, there has been no formal evaluation of the role of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Erik Gustavsson (2013). From Needs to Health Care Needs. Health Care Analysis (1):1-14.score: 384.0
    One generally considered plausible way to allocate resources in health care is according to people’s needs. In this paper I focus on a somewhat overlooked issue, that is the conceptual structure of health care needs. It is argued that what conceptual understanding of needs one has is decisive in the assessment of what qualifies as a health care need and what does not. The aim for this paper is a clarification of the concept of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Robert Baker (1993). Visibility and the Just Allocation of Health Care: A Study of Age-Rationing in the British National Health Service. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 1 (2):139-150.score: 384.0
    The British National Health Service (BNHS) was founded, to quote Minister of Health Aneurin Bevan, to ‘universalise the best’. Over time, however, financial constraints forced the BNHS to turn to incrementalist budgeting, to rationalise care and to ask its practitioners to act as gatekeepers. Seeking a way to ration scarce tertiary care resources, BNHS gatekeepers began to use chronological age as a rationing criterion. Age-rationing became the ‘done thing’ without explicit policy directives and in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Leonard M. Fleck (1994). Just Caring: Health Reform and Health Care Rationing. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (5):435-443.score: 360.0
    Health reform must include health care rationing, both for reasons of fairness and efficiency. Few politicians are willing to accept this claim, including the Clinton Administration. Brown and others have argued that enormous waste and inefficiency must be wrung out of our health care system before morally problematic cost constraining options, such as rationing, can be justifiably adopted. However, I argue that most of the policies and practices that would diminish waste and inefficiency (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Carina Fourie, What Do Theories of Social Justice Have to Say About Health Care Rationing?score: 360.0
    One of the most controversial issues in many health care systems is health care rationing. In essence, rationing refers to the denial of - or delay in - access to scarce goods and services in health care, despite the existence of medical need. Scarcity of financial and medical resources confronts society with painful questions. Who should decide which medicine or new treatment will be covered by social security and on which criteria such (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Leonard M. Fleck (1994). Just Caring: Oregon, Health Care Rationing, and Informed Democratic Deliberation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (4):367-388.score: 360.0
    This essay argues that our national efforts at health reform ought to be informed by eleven key lessons from Oregon. Specifically, we must learn that the need for health care rationing is inescapable, that any rationing process must be public and visible, and that fair rationing protocols must be self-imposed through a process of rational democratic deliberation. Part I of this essay notes that rationing is a ubiquitous feature of our health (...) system at present, but it is mostly hidden rationing, which is presumptively unjust. Part II argues that the need for health care rationing is inescapable. Although Oregon is flawed as a model of health rationing, it gives us worthy moral lessons for health reform at the national level, which I analyze and defend in Part III. The most significant of these lessons is the importance of rational democratic deliberation in articulating fair rationing protocols for a community. In Part IV I sketch the philosophic justification for this approach and respond to some important criticisms from Daniels. Keywords: cost containment, democratic deliberation, fairness, justice, rationing CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this? (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David A. Gruenewald (2012). Can Health Care Rationing Ever Be Rational? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):17-25.score: 360.0
    Americans' appetite for life-prolonging therapies has led to unsustainable growth in health care costs. It is tempting to target older people for health care rationing based on their disproportionate use of health care resources and lifespan already lived, but aged-based rationing is unacceptable to many. Systems reforms can improve the efficiency of health care and may lessen pressure to ration services, but difficult choices still must be made to limit expensive, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Richard Hull, Philosophical, Ethical, and Moral Aspects of Health Care Rationing: A Review of Daniel Callahan's Setting Limits. [REVIEW]score: 360.0
    My assigned task in today’s colloquium is to review philosophers’ perspectives on the broad question of whether health care rationing ought to target the elderly. This is a revolutionary question, particularly in a society that is so sensitive to apparent discrimination, and the question must be approached carefully if it is to be successfully dealt with. Three subordinate questions attend this one and must be addressed in the course of answering it. The first such question has (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Greg Bognar & Iwao Hirose (2014). The Ethics of Health Care Rationing: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 360.0
    Should organ transplants be given to patients who have waited the longest, or need it most urgently, or those whose survival prospects are the best? The rationing of health care is universal and inevitable, taking place in poor and affluent countries, in publicly funded and private health care systems. Someone must budget for as well as dispense health care whilst aging populations severely stretch the availability of resources. The Ethics of Health (...) Rationing is a clear and much-needed introduction to this increasingly important topic, considering and assessing the major ethical problems and dilemmas about the allocation, scarcity and rationing of health care. Beginning with a helpful overview of why rationing is an ethical problem, the authors examine the following key topics: What is the value of health? How can it be measured? What does it mean that a treatment is "good value for money"? What sort of distributive principles - utilitarian, egalitarian or prioritarian - should we rely on when thinking about health care rationing? Does rationing health care unfairly discriminate against the elderly and people with disabilities? Should patients be held responsible for their health? Why does the debate on responsibility for health lead to issues about socioeconomic status and social inequality? Throughout the book, examples from the US, UK and other countries are used to illustrate the ethical issues at stake. Additional features such as chapter summaries, annotated further reading and discussion questions make this an ideal starting point for students new to the subject, not only in philosophy but also in closely related fields such as politics, health economics, public health, medicine, nursing and social work. (shrink)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Leonard M. Fleck (2011). Just Caring: Health Care Rationing, Terminal Illness, and the Medically Least Well Off. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):156-171.score: 357.0
    What does it mean to be a “just” and “caring” society in meeting the health care needs of the terminally ill when we have only limited resources to meet virtually unlimited health care needs? That question is the focus of this essay. Put another way: relative to all the other health care needs in our society, especially the need for lifesaving or life-prolonging health care, how high a priority ought the health (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. James Lindemann Nelson (1996). Measured Fairness, Situated Justice: Feminist Reflections on Health Care Rationing. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (1):53-68.score: 357.0
    : Bioethical discussion of justice in health care has been much enlivened in recent years by new developments in the theory of rationing and by the emergence of a strong communitarian voice. Unfortunately, these developments have not enjoyed much in the way of close engagement with feminist-inspired reflections on power, privilege, and justice. I hope here to promote interchange between "mainstream" treatments of justice in health care and feminist thought.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. D. Seedhouse (1995). Why Bioethicists Have Nothing Useful to Say About Health Care Rationing. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):288-291.score: 357.0
    Bioethicists are increasingly commenting on health care resource allocation, and sometimes suggest ways to solve various rationing dilemmas ethically. I argue that both because of the assumptions bioethicists make about social reality, and because of the methods of argument they use, they cannot possibly make a useful contribution to the debate. Bioethicists who want to make a practical difference should either approach health care resource allocation as if the matter hinged upon tribal competition (which is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Robert A. Pearlman (1992). An Ethical Framework for Rationing Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (1):79-96.score: 348.0
    This paper proposes an ethical framework for rationing publicly financed health care. We begin by classifying alternative rationing criteria according to their ethical basis. We then examine the ethical arguments for four rationing criteria. These alternatives include rationing high technology services, non-basic services, services to patients who receive the least medical benefit, and services that are not equally available to all. We submit that a just health care system will not limit basic (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Leonard M. Fleck (1987). Drgs: Justice and the Invisible Rationing of Health Care Resources. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (2):165-196.score: 348.0
    This is the primary question which this essay will answer. But there is a prior methodological question that also needs to be addressed: How do we go about rationally (non-arbitrarily) assessing whether DRGs are just or not? I would suggest that grand, ideal theories of justice (Rawls, Nozick) have only very limited utility for answering this question. What we really need is a theory of "interstitial justice," that is, an approach to making justice judgments that is suitable to assessing the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Aaron L. Mackler (2001). Jewish and Roman Catholic Approaches to Access to Health Care and Rationing. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (4):317-336.score: 348.0
    : In addressing issues of access to health care and rationing, Jewish and Roman Catholic writers identify similar guiding values and specific concerns. Moral thinkers in each tradition tend to support the guarantee of universal access to at least a basic level of health care for all members of society, based on such values as human dignity, justice, and healing. Catholic writers are more likely to frame their arguments in terms of the common good and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ole Frithjof Norheim (1995). The Norwegian Welfare State in Transition: Rationing and Plurality of Values as Ethical Challenges for the Health Care System. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (6):639-655.score: 348.0
    This paper presents the Norwegian national health care system and the manner in which the problems of rationing and pluralism of values create new ethical and political challenges. The paper concludes with some doubts about the feasibility of the transformation taking place within this kind of health care system, with special reference to governmental control and consumer preference. Keywords: national health care, pluralism, rationing, two-tier system CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. N. S. Jecker & R. A. Pearlman (1992). An Ethical Framework for Rationing Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (1):79-96.score: 348.0
    This paper proposes an ethical framework for rationing publicly financed health care. We begin by classifying alternative rationing criteria according to their ethical basis. We then examine the ethical arguments for four rationing criteria. These alternatives include rationing high technology services, non-basic services, services to patients who receive the least medical benefit, and services that are not equally available to all. We submit that a just health care system will not limit basic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Yvonne Denier (2008). Mind the Gap! Three Approaches to Scarcity in Health Care. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):73-87.score: 339.0
    This paper addresses two ways in which scarcity in health care turns up and three ways in which this dual condition of scarcity can be approached. The first approach is the economic approach, which focuses on the causes of cost-increase in health care and on developing various mechanisms of rationing and priority-setting in health care. The second approach is the justice approach, which interprets scarcity as one of the Humean ‹Circumstances of Justice.’ Whereas (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Helge Skirbekk & Per Nortvedt (2011). Making a Difference: A Qualitative Study on Care and Priority Setting in Health Care. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (1):77-88.score: 321.0
    The focus of the study is the conflict between care and concern for particular patients, versus considerations that take impartial considerations of justice to be central to moral deliberations. To examine these questions we have conducted qualitative interviews with health professionals in Norwegian hospitals. We found a value norm that implicitly seemed to overrule all others, the norm of ‘making a difference for the patients’. We will examine what such a statement implies, aiming to shed some light over (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Larry R. Churchill (2005). Age-Rationing in Health Care: Flawed Policy, Personal Virtue. Health Care Analysis 13 (2):137-146.score: 321.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Maureen Ramsay (1995). Review Article Making Choices: The Ethical Problems in Determining Criteria for Health Care Rationing. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 3 (2):171-175.score: 312.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Leonard M. Fleck (2001). Pricing Life: Why It's Time for Health Care Rationing, by Peter A. Ubel, M.D. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2000. 208 Pp. $25.00. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):214-218.score: 306.0
    This is a book for reflective laypersons and health professionals who wish to better understand what the problem of healthcare rationing is all about. Ubel says clearly in the Introduction that it is unlikely that professional economists or philosophers are going to be very satisfied with this effort. For him it is more important (p. xix). This is a reasonable aim made achievable by Ubel's clear and engaging writing style. Probably the people who most need to be drawn (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. W. A. Landman & L. D. Henley (1999). Equitable Rationing of Highly Specialised Health Care Services for Children: A Perspective From South Africa. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (3):224-229.score: 303.0
    The principles of equality and equity, respectively in the Bill of Rights and the white paper on health, provide the moral and legal foundations for future health care for children in South Africa. However, given extreme health care need and scarce resources, the government faces formidable obstacles if it hopes to achieve a just allocation of public health care resources, especially among children in need of highly specialised health care. In this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Maria W. Merritt (2011). Health Researchers' Ancillary Care Obligations in Low-Resource Settings: How Can We Tell What is Morally Required? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (4):311-347.score: 297.0
    Health researchers working in low-resource settings routinely encounter serious unmet health needs for which research participants have, at best, limited treatment options through the local health system (Taylor, Merritt, and Mullany 2011). A recent case discussion features a study conducted in Bamako, Mali (Dickert and Wendler 2009). The study objective was to see whether children with severe malaria develop pulmonary hypertension in order to improve the general understanding of morbidity and mortality associated with malaria. In the study (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Mark A. Hall (1997). Making Medical Spending Decisions: The Law, Ethics, and Economics of Rationing Mechanisms. Oxford University Press.score: 297.0
    This book explores the making of health care rationing decisions through the analysis of three alternative decision makers: patients paying out of pocket; officials setting limits on treatments and coverage; and physicians at the bedside. Hall develops this analysis along three dimensions: political economics, ethics, and law. The economic dimension addresses the practical feasibility of each method. The ethical dimension discusses the moral aspects of these methods, while the legal dimension traces the most recent developments in jurisprudence (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Christian Witting (2001). National Health Service Rationing: Implications for the Standard of Care in Negligence. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (3):443-471.score: 297.0
    In this paper it is argued that courts must, where appropriate, take into account the fact that National Health Service hospitals are under‐funded when they determine the standard of care owed by such hospitals and their professional staff to patients. Although this suggestion is inconsistent with the traditional view of the courts, its adoption would bring negligence cases into harmony with judicial review decisions. It would also cohere with a new understanding of accident causation within complex organisations, which (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. C. Sinding, L. Schwartz, M. Hunt, L. Redwood-Campbell, L. Elit & J. Ranford (2010). 'Playing God Because You Have To': Health Professionals' Narratives of Rationing Care in Humanitarian and Development Work. Public Health Ethics 3 (2):147-156.score: 288.0
    This article explores the accounts of Canadian-trained health professionals working in humanitarian and development organizations who considered not treating a patient or group of patients because of resource limitations. In the narratives, not treating the patient(s) was sometimes understood as the right thing to do, and sometimes as wrong. In analyzing participants’ narratives we draw attention to how medications and equipment are represented. In one type of narrative, medications and equipment are represented primarily as scarce resources; in another, they (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Norman Daniels (2010). Review of Leonard M. Fleck, Just Caring: Health Care Rationing and Democratic Deliberation. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).score: 270.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. M. Longo (2002). The Ethics of Health Care Rationing: Principles and Practices: J Butler. Cassell, 1999, Pound16.99, Pp 248. ISBN 0304705829. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (1):57-57.score: 270.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Alan B. Cohen (2012). The Debate Over Health Care Rationing: Deja Vu All Over Again? Inquiry 49 (2):90.score: 270.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Mark A. Hall (1994). The Ethics of Health Care Rationing. Public Affairs Quarterly 8 (1):33-50.score: 270.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Søren Holm (2001). Pricing Life–Why It's Time for Health Care Rationing Peter A Ubel, Cambridge, MA, The MIT Press, 2000, 208 Pages, £15.50. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):356-356.score: 270.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. R. Cookson (2000). Principles of Justice in Health Care Rationing. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):323-329.score: 270.0
  37. William Boardman, Health Care Rationing: What It Means.score: 270.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Christina Dineen (2011). Is Justice a Virtue?: Examining the Role of Justice Considerations in Micro-Level Health Care Rationing. International Journal of Ethics 7 (1).score: 270.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. P. T. Menzel (1992). Prior Consent as a Liberal Theory of Health Care Rationing: Commments of Savulescu's Constructive Critique. Bioethics 6 (2):158-165.score: 270.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. M. Montandon (2000). A Defense of Visible Health Care Rationing. Princeton Journal of Bioethics 4:64-78.score: 270.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Barbara J. Russell (2002). Health-Care Rationing: Critical Features, Ordinary Language, and Meaning. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (1):82-87.score: 270.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Peter G. Woolcock (1993). Public Health-Consent Health Care Rationing: The Prior Consent Approach. Bioethics Research Notes 5:1.score: 270.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Marcel Bahro, Christian Kämpf & Jindrich Strnad (2001). Die Verteilungsgerechtigkeit Medizinischer Leistungen. Ein Beitrag Zur Rationierungsdebatte Aus Wirtschaftsethischer Sicht. Ethik in der Medizin 13 (1-2):45-60.score: 267.0
    Definition of the problem: Rationing medical health care has been debated in the industrialized Western hemisphere for at least two decades. Many factors have contributed to the fact that medical care can no longer be provided free of charge, which used to be an explicit political goal in all countries with a well-established welfare system. Considerable shortage of public financial resources is now generally accepted to pertain also to the health care system. Arguments: So (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. L. Valerio & W. Ricciardi (2011). The Current Status of Decision-Making Procedures and Quality Assurance in Europe: An Overview. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):383-396.score: 264.0
    The 2005 Report on Social Responsibility and Health of the UNESCO International Bioethics Committee (Ibc) proposes a new approach to implementing the right to healthcare and suggests a number of Courses of Action to be followed in various fields. Based on the latest available data, we intend to present an overview of the current state of European health systems in two of those fields—decision-making procedures and quality assurance in health care—and to attempt a comparison of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Margaret P. Battin (1987). Age Rationing and the Just Distribution of Health Care: Is There a Duty to Die? Ethics 97 (2):317-340.score: 261.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. John J. Paris (2011). Rationing: A “Decent Minimum” or a “Consumer Driven” Health Care System? American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):16 - 18.score: 261.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 7, Page 16-18, July 2011.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Robert L. Woolfolk & John M. Doris (2002). Rationing Mental Health Care: Parity, Disparity, and Justice. Bioethics 16 (5):469–485.score: 261.0
  48. Norman Daniels (1998). Symposium on the Rationing of Health Care: 2 Rationing Medical Care — A Philosopher's Perspective on Outcomes and Process. Economics and Philosophy 14 (01):27-.score: 261.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Leonard M. Fleck (1990). Justice, Hmos, and the Invisible Rationing of Health Care Resources. Bioethics 4 (2):97–120.score: 261.0
  50. Peter Diamond (1998). Symposium on the Rationing of Health Care: 1 Rationing Medical Care — An Economist's Perspective. Economics and Philosophy 14 (01):1-.score: 261.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000