Search results for 'Hearing' (try it on Scholar)

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Bibliography: Hearing in Philosophy of Mind
  1. Alessandro Arbo (2009). Some Remarks on “Hearing-as” and its Role in the Aesthetics of Music. Topoi 28 (2):97-107.score: 24.0
    Starting from the context in which Wittgenstein thinks of the concepts of “seeing-as” and “hearing-as”, the basic relation is clarified between the question of representation, musical understanding, and the theory of musical expressiveness. The points of views of Wollheim, Scruton, Levinson, and Ridley are discussed, in a re-consideration of the notions of hearing and understanding within Wittgenstein’s “last philosophy”.
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  2. Gregor Wolbring (2013). Hearing Beyond the Normal Enabled by Therapeutic Devices: The Role of the Recipient and the Hearing Profession. Neuroethics 6 (3):607-616.score: 24.0
    The time is near where ‘therapeutic’ bodily assistive devices, developed to mimic species-typical body structures in order to enable normative body functioning, will allow the wearer to outperform the species-typical body in various functions. Although such devices are developed for people that are seen to exhibit sub species-typical abilities, many ‘therapeutic enhancements’ might also be desired and used by people that exhibit species-typical body abilities. This paper presents the views of members of the World Federation of the Deaf on potential (...)
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  3. Mirko Bagaric (2010). The Right to an Impartial Hearing Trumps the Social Imperative of Bringing Accused to Trial Even 'Down Under'. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):321-339.score: 24.0
    Accused persons who are subjected to a saturation level of negative media coverage may be denied an impartial hearing, which is perhaps the most important aspect of the right to a fair hearing. Despite this, the courts have generally held that the social imperative of prosecuting accused trumps the interests of the accused. The justification for an impartial hearing stems from the repugnance of convicting the innocent. Viewed dispassionately, this imperative is not absolute, given that every (...)
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  4. Janice Morse (2011). Hearing Bad News. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (3):187-211.score: 24.0
    Personal reports of receiving bad news provide data that describes patients’ comprehension, reflections, experienced emotions, and an interpretative commentary with the wisdom of hindsight. Analysis of autobiographical accounts of “hearing bad news” enables the identification of patterns of how patients found out diagnoses, buffering techniques used, and styles of receiving the news. I describe how patients grapple with the news, their somatic responses to hearing, and how they struggle and strive to accept what they are hearing. I (...)
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  5. Casey O'Callaghan (2013). Hearing, Philosophical Perspectives. In H. Pashler (ed.), Encyclopedia of the Mind. SAGE. 388-390.score: 24.0
    Hearing and auditory perception are rapidly developing topics in the philosophy of perception. Recent work has focused on characterizing what we hear and on similarities and differences between audition and other modalities. Future work should address how theorizing about audition impacts theorizing about perception more generally. This entry concerns questions about the objects and contents of hearing. It includes discussion of the spatial content of audition, of the role of time and pitch in the individuation of auditory objects, (...)
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  6. Anette Lykke Hindhede (2013). Situations of Choice: Configuring the Empowered Consumer of Hearing Technologies. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-17.score: 24.0
    Focusing on the largest and, arguably, the least visible disability group, the hearing impaired, this paper explores present-day views and understandings of hearing impairment and rehabilitation in a Danish context, with particular focus on working-age adults with late onset of hearing impairment. The paper shows how recent changes in perception of the hearing impaired patient relate to the introduction of a new health care reform that turns audiological rehabilitation into a consumer issue. Ethnographic and interview data (...)
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  7. Elisabet Classon (2013). Erratum: Early ERP Signature of Hearing Impairment in Visual Rhyme Judgment. Frontiers in Psychology 4:897.score: 24.0
    Erratum: Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment.
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  8. Karen A. Gordon Talar Hopyan, Isabelle Peretz, Lisa P. Chan, Blake C. Papsin (2012). Children Using Cochlear Implants Capitalize on Acoustical Hearing for Music Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Cochlear implants (CIs) electrically stimulate the auditory nerve providing children who are deaf with access to speech and music. Because of device limitations, it was hypothesized that children using CIs develop abnormal perception of musical cues. Perception of pitch and rhythm as well as memory for music was measured by the children’s version of the Montreal Battery of Amusia (MBEA) in 23 unilateral CI users and 22 age-matched children with normal hearing. Children with CIs were less accurate than their (...)
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  9. Kim Matthew Kiely, Kaarin J. Anstey & Mary A. Luszcz (2013). Dual Sensory Loss and Depressive Symptoms: The Importance of Hearing, Daily Functioning and Activity Engagement. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:837.score: 24.0
    Background: The association between dual sensory loss (DSL) and mental health has been well established. However, most studies have relied on self-report data and lacked measures that would enable researchers to examine causal pathways between DSL and depression. This study seeks to extend this research by examining the effects of DSL on mental health, and identify factors that explain the longitudinal associations between sensory loss and depressive symptoms. Methods: Piecewise linear-mixed models were used to analyse 16-years of longitudinal data collected (...)
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  10. Olof Sandgren, Richard Andersson, Joost van de Weijer, Kristina Hansson & Birgitta Sahlén (2013). Impact of Cognitive and Linguistic Ability on Gaze Behavior in Children with Hearing Impairment. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    In order to explore verbal-nonverbal integration, we investigated the influence of cognitive and linguistic ability on gaze behavior during spoken language conversation between children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment (HI) and normal-hearing (NH) peers. Ten HI-NH and ten NH-NH dyads performed a referential communication task requiring description of faces. During task performance, eye movements and speech were tracked. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model associations between performance on cognitive and linguistic tasks and the probability of gaze to (...)
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  11. Moreland Perkins (1966). Seeing and Hearing Emotions. Analysis 26 (June):193-197.score: 21.0
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  12. Lauri Siisiäinen (2012). Foucault and the Politics of Hearing. Routledge.score: 21.0
    This work will be of great interest to students and scholars in a range of areas including political theory, philosophy, and cultural studies.
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  13. M. Lawrence (1941). Vitamin A Deficiency and its Relation to Hearing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (1):37.score: 21.0
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  14. Rudolf Pintner & Donald G. Paterson (1917). A Comparison of Deaf and Hearing Children in Visual Memory for Digits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 2 (1):76-88.score: 21.0
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  15. Jan A. Duijvestijn, Janneke P. C. Grutters, Michelene N. Chenault, Manuela A. Joore, Johannes J. Manni & Lucien J. C. Anteunis (2011). Shared Care for Hearing Complaints: Guideline Effects on Patient Flow. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (2):209-214.score: 21.0
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  16. R. Gundlach (1929). Tonal Attributes and Frequency Theories of Hearing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (3):187.score: 21.0
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  17. Ting‐Kuang Chao & Tony Hsiu‐Hsi Chen (2009). Predictive Model for Progression of Hearing Loss: Meta‐Analysis of Multi‐State Outcome. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):32-40.score: 21.0
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  18. S. Dworkin, J. Katzman, G. A. Hutchinson & J. R. McCabe (1940). Hearing Acuity of Animals as Measured by Conditioning Methods. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (3):281.score: 21.0
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  19. David S. Emmerich, Donald M. Goldenbaum, Dale L. Hayden, Linda S. Hoffman & Jeanne L. Treffts (1965). Meaningfulness as a Variable in Dichotic Hearing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (4):433.score: 21.0
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  20. Janneke P. C. Grutters, Lucien J. C. Anteunis, Michelene N. Chenault & Manuela A. Joore (2009). Willingness to Pay for a Hearing Aid: Comparing the Payment Scale and Open‐Ended Question. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):91-96.score: 21.0
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  21. A. H. Holway, R. C. Staton & M. J. Zigler (1940). The Neurophysiology of Hearing: I. The Magnitude of Threshold-Stimuli During Recovery From Stimulation-Deafness. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):669.score: 21.0
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  22. Don Ihde (1982). On Hearing Shapes, Surfaces and Interiors. In Phenomenology Dialogues & Bridges. Suny.score: 21.0
     
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  23. Margaret A. Defeyter, Jill Hearing & Tamsin C. German (2009). A Developmental Dissociation Between Category and Function Judgments About Novel Artifacts. Cognition 110 (2):260-264.score: 20.0
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  24. Casey O'Callaghan (2011). Against Hearing Meanings. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):783-807.score: 18.0
    Listening to speech in a language you know differs phenomenologically from listening to speech in an unfamiliar language, a fact often exploited in debates about the phenomenology of thought and cognition. It is plausible that the difference is partly perceptual. Some contend that hearing familiar language involves auditory perceptual awareness of meanings or semantic properties of spoken utterances; but if this were so, there must be something distinctive it is like auditorily to perceptually experience specific meanings of spoken utterances. (...)
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  25. Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard (2003). Hearing Colors, Tasting Shapes. Scientific American (May):52-59.score: 18.0
    Jones and Coleman are among a handful of otherwise normal as a child and the number 5 was red and 6 was green. This the- people who have synesthesia. They experience the ordinary ory does not answer why only some people retain such vivid world in extraordinary ways and seem to inhabit a mysterious sensory memories, however. You might _think _of cold when you no-man’s-land between fantasy and reality. For them the sens- look at a picture of an ice cube, (...)
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  26. Paul F. Snowdon (2009). Peacocke on Musical Experience and Hearing Metaphorically-As. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):277-281.score: 18.0
    Christopher Peacocke's paper presents a characteristically rich and original theory of the so-called expressive qualities of music. It is, surely, impossible to come to a verdict on such an interesting theory quickly, and it will, no doubt, attract continuing and merited attention. The purpose of my preliminary reflections is to raise some questions about the proposal and to express some reservations, but I see these remarks as simply opening and inconclusive ones in a longer dialogue. I am going to divide (...)
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  27. Hannes Ole Matthiessen (2010). Seeing and Hearing Directly. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):91-103.score: 18.0
    According to Paul Snowdon, one directly perceives an object x iff one is in a position to make a true demonstrative judgement of the form “That is x”. Whenever one perceives an object x indirectly (or dependently , as Snowdon puts it) it is the case that there exists an item y (which is not identical to x) such that one can count as demonstrating x only if one acknowledges that y bears a certain relation to x. In this paper (...)
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  28. Carol Gilligan (1995). Hearing the Difference: Theorizing Connection. Hypatia 10 (2):120 - 127.score: 18.0
    Hearing the difference between a patriarchal voice and a relational voice defines a paradigm shift: a change in the conception of the human world. Theorizing connection as primary and fundamental in human life leads to a new psychology, which shifts the grounds for philosophy and political theory. A crucial distinction is made between a feminine ethic of care and a feminist ethic of care. Voice, relationship, resistance, and women become central rather than peripheral in this reframing of the human (...)
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  29. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2013). Toward an Objective Phenomenological Vocabulary: How Seeing a Scarlet Red is Like Hearing a Trumpet's Blare. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):837-858.score: 18.0
    Nagel’s challenge is to devise an objective phenomenological vocabulary that can describe the objective structural similarities between aural and visual perception. My contention is that Charles Sanders Peirce’s little studied and less understood phenomenological vocabulary makes a significant contribution to meeting this challenge. I employ Peirce’s phenomenology to identify the structural isomorphism between seeing a scarlet red and hearing a trumpet’s blare. I begin by distinguishing between the vividness of an experience and the intensity of a quality. I proceed (...)
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  30. C. Mand, R. E. Duncan, L. Gillam, V. Collins & M. B. Delatycki (2009). Genetic Selection for Deafness: The Views of Hearing Children of Deaf Adults. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):722-728.score: 18.0
    The concept of selecting for a disability, and deafness in particular, has triggered a controversial and sometimes acrimonious debate between key stakeholders. Previous studies have concentrated on the views of the deaf and hard of hearing, health professionals and ethicists towards reproductive selection for deafness. This study, however, is the first of its kind examining the views of hearing children of deaf adults towards preimplantation genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis to select for or against deafness. Hearing children (...)
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  31. Isabelle Sendowski & Jacques Viret (2004). The Survival Attractor in the Sensory Functions: The Example of Hearing. Acta Biotheoretica 52 (4).score: 18.0
    High noise levels may have an adverse effect on the normal cochlea function and lead to significant hearing loss. Clinically, exposure to high intensity impulse noise produces a wide range of audiometric effects which may result in long term or even irreversible symptoms. Nevertheless, there is sometimes a spontaneous rebound recovery of the auditory function. This phenomenon was previously studied in the vision, another sensory function. It was called the visual survival attractor.In view of the importance that the sensory (...)
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  32. Robert Y. Shapiro (2013). Hearing the Opposition: It Starts at the Top. Critical Review 25 (2):226-244.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT In Hearing the Other Side, Diana Mutz poses a conundrum: The more one is exposed to political disagreement, the more likely one is to withdraw from political engagement. This behavior may result in part from the political polarization of recent decades, but it may also be due to the traditional media, which tend to magnify political competition and portray it as a bitter conflict. The rise of the Internet and social media offered hope that people might more readily (...)
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  33. Dana L. Strait & Nina Kraus (2011). Can You Hear Me Now? Musical Training Shapes Functional Brain Networks for Selective Auditory Attention and Hearing Speech in Noise. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    Even in the quietest of rooms, our senses are perpetually inundated by a barrage of sounds, requiring the auditory system to adapt to a variety of listening conditions in order to extract signals of interest (e.g., one speaker’s voice amidst others). Brain networks that promote selective attention are thought to sharpen the neural encoding of a target signal, suppressing competing sounds and enhancing perceptual performance. Here, we ask: does musical training benefit cortical mechanisms that underlie selective attention to speech? To (...)
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  34. Matthew Winn, Ariane Rhone, Monita Chatterjee & William Idsardi (2013). The Use of Auditory and Visual Context in Speech Perception by Listeners with Normal Hearing and Listeners with Cochlear Implants. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    There is a wide range of acoustic and visual variability across different talkers and different speaking contexts. Listeners with normal hearing accommodate that variability in ways that facilitate efficient perception, but it is not known whether listeners with cochlear implants can do the same. In this study, listeners with normal hearing (NH) and listeners with cochlear implants (CIs) were tested for accommodation to auditory and visual phonetic contexts created by gender-driven speech differences as well as vowel coarticulation and (...)
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  35. Frederick Antczak (1994). Hearing Our Cassandras: Ethical Criticism and Rhetorical Receptions of Paul Ehrlich. Social Epistemology 8 (3):281 – 288.score: 18.0
    (1994). Hearing our cassandras: Ethical criticism and rhetorical receptions of Paul Ehrlich. Social Epistemology: Vol. 8, Public Indifference to Population Issues, pp. 281-288.
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  36. Josefine Andin, Eleni Orfanidou, Velia Cardin, Emil Holmer, Cheryl M. Capek, Bencie Woll, Jerker Rönnberg & Mary Rudner (2013). Similar Digit-Based Working Memory in Deaf Signers and Hearing Non-Signers Despite Digit Span Differences. Frontiers in Psychology 4:942.score: 18.0
    Similar working memory (WM) for lexical items has been demonstrated for signers and non-signers while short-term memory (STM) is regularly poorer in deaf than hearing individuals. In the present study, we investigated digit-based WM and STM in Swedish and British deaf signers and hearing non-signers. To maintain good experimental control we used printed stimuli throughout and held response mode constant across groups. We showed that deaf signers have similar digit-based WM performance, despite shorter digit spans, compared to well-matched (...)
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  37. Chloë R. Marshall & Gary Morgan (2014). From Gesture to Sign Language: Conventionalization of Classifier Constructions by Adult Hearing Learners of British Sign Language. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3).score: 18.0
    There has long been interest in why languages are shaped the way they are, and in the relationship between sign language and gesture. In sign languages, entity classifiers are handshapes that encode how objects move, how they are located relative to one another, and how multiple objects of the same type are distributed in space. Previous studies have shown that hearing adults who are asked to use only manual gestures to describe how objects move in space will use gestures (...)
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  38. Stephen Andrew Butterfill (2009). Seeing Causings and Hearing Gestures. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (236):405-428.score: 16.0
    Can humans see causal interactions? Evidence on the visual perception of causal interactions, from Michotte to contemporary work, is best interpreted as showing that we can see some causal interactions in the same sense as that in which we can hear speech. Causal perception, like speech perception, is a form of categorical perception.
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  39. Martha C. Nussbaum (2004). On Hearing Women's Voices: A Reply to Susan Okin. Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (2):193–205.score: 15.0
  40. Paul A. Boghossian (2002). On Hearing the Music in the Sound: Scruton on Musical Expression. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):49–55.score: 15.0
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  41. Eric Dietrich (1996). AI, Situatedness, Creativity, and Intelligence; or the Evolution of the Little Hearing Bones. J. Of Experimental and Theoretical AI 8 (1):1-6.score: 15.0
    Good sciences have good metaphors. Indeed, good sciences are good because they have good metaphors. AI could use more good metaphors. In this editorial, I would like to propose a new metaphor to help us understand intelligence. Of course, whether the metaphor is any good or not depends on whether it actually does help us. (What I am going to propose is not something opposed to computationalism -- the hypothesis that cognition is computation. Noncomputational metaphors are in vogue these days, (...)
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  42. Vincent Bergeron & Dominic Mciver Lopes (2009). Hearing and Seeing Musical Expression. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):1-16.score: 15.0
    Everybody assumes (1) that musical performances are sonic events and (2) that their expressive properties are sonic properties. This paper discusses recent findings in the psychology of music perception that show that visual information combines with auditory information in the perception of musical expression. The findings show at the very least that arguments are needed for (1) and (2). If music expresses what we think it does, then its expressive properties may be visual as well as sonic; and if its (...)
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  43. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2009). Hearing a Still-Ticking Bomb Argument: A Reply to Bufacchi and Arrigo. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):205-209.score: 15.0
    My aim in this paper is to demonstrate that the recent anti-Ticking Bomb argument offered by Bufacchi and Arrigo is unsuccessful. To adequately refute the Ticking Bomb strategy, I claim, requires carefully addressing both policy questions and questions involving exceptional conduct.
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  44. David J. Cole, Hearing Yourself Think: Natural Language, Inner Speech, and Thought.score: 15.0
    "Mantras were not viewed as the only means of expressing truth, however. Thought, which was defined as internalized speech, offered yet another aspect of truth. And if words and thoughts designated different aspects of truth, or reality, then there had to be an underlying unity behind all phenomena" (S. A. Nigosian 1994: World Faiths, p. 84).
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  45. David Archard & Marit Skivenes, Hearing the Child.score: 15.0
    Given that in our view the child has a fundamental right to be heard in all collective deliberative processes determining his or her future, we set out, firstly, what is required of such processes to respect this right – namely that the child's authentic voice is heard and makes a difference – and, secondly, the distance between this ideal and practice exemplified in the work of child welfare and child protection workers in Norway and the UK, chiefly in their display (...)
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  46. Michael P. Levine (2000). Contemporary Christian Analytic Philosophy of Religion: Biblical Fundamentalism, Terrible Solutions to a Horrible Problem, and Hearing God. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 48 (2):89-119.score: 15.0
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  47. Rosamond Rhodes (2002). Reading Rawls and Hearing Hobbes. Philosophical Forum 33 (4):393–412.score: 15.0
  48. Casey O'Callaghan (2011). Hearing Properties, Effects or Parts? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):375-405.score: 15.0
    Sounds are audible, and sound sources are audible. What is the audible relation between audible sounds and audible sources? Common talk and philosophy suggest three candidates. The first is that sounds audibly are properties instantiated by their sources. I argue that sounds are audible individuals and thus are not audibly instantiated by audible sources. The second is that sounds audibly are effects of their sources. I argue that auditory experience presents no compelling evidence that sounds audibly are causally related to (...)
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  49. Bernhard Waldenfels (1994). Hearing Oneself Speak: Derrida's Recording of the Phenomenological Voice. Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (S1):65-77.score: 15.0
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  50. Rob van Gerwen (2012). Hearing Musicians Making Music: A Critique of Roger Scruton on Acousmatic Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):223-230.score: 15.0
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