Search results for 'Heat' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Gray (2013). What Do Our Experiences of Heat and Cold Represent? Philosophical Studies 166 (1):131-151.
    Our experiences of heat and cold are usually thought to represent states of things: their hotness and coldness. I propose a novel account according to which their contents are not states of things but processes, more specifically, the opposite processes of thermal energy being transmitted to and from the body, respectively. I call this account the Heat Exchange Model of heat perception. Having set out the evidence in support of the proposal, I conclude by showing how it (...)
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  2. Richard Gray (2003). Tye's Representationalism: Feeling the Heat? Philosophical Studies 115 (3):245-256.
    According to Tye's PANIC theory of consciousness, perceptual states of creatures which are related to a disjunction of external contents will fail to represent sensorily, and thereby fail to be conscious states. In this paper I argue that heat perception, a form of perception neglected in the recent literature, serves as a counterexample to Tye's radical externalist claim. Having laid out Tye's absent qualia scenario, the PANIC theory from which it derives and the case of heat perception as (...)
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  3.  91
    Tarja Knuuttila & Mieke Boon (2011). How Do Models Give Us Knowledge? The Case of Carnot's Ideal Heat Engine. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):309-334.
    Our concern is in explaining how and why models give us useful knowledge. We argue that if we are to understand how models function in the actual scientific practice the representational approach to models proves either misleading or too minimal. We propose turning from the representational approach to the artefactual, which implies also a new unit of analysis: the activity of modelling. Modelling, we suggest, could be approached as a specific practice in which concrete artefacts, i.e., models, are constructed with (...)
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  4.  23
    Ramandeep S. Johal, Renuka Rai & Günter Mahler (2015). Reversible Heat Engines: Bounds on Estimated Efficiency From Inference. Foundations of Physics 45 (2):158-170.
    We consider work extraction from two finite reservoirs with constant heat capacity, when the thermodynamic coordinates of the process are not fully specified, i.e., are described by probabilities only. Incomplete information refers to both the specific value of the temperature as well as the label of the reservoir to which it is assigned. Based on the concept of inference, we characterize the reduced performance resulting from this lack of control. Indeed, the estimates for the average efficiency reveal that uncertainty (...)
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  5.  84
    Frank Jackson (1980). A Note on Physicalism and Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (March):26-34.
  6.  32
    Norman Malcolm (1980). Kripke on Heat and Sensations of Heat. Philosophical Investigations 3 (1):12-20.
  7.  28
    David M. Armstrong (1963). Vesey on Sensations of Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (December):359-362.
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  8.  8
    Earl Prinsloo, Mokgadi M. Setati, Victoria M. Longshaw & Gregory L. Blatch (2009). Chaperoning Stem Cells: A Role for Heat Shock Proteins in the Modulation of Stem Cell Self‐Renewal and Differentiation? Bioessays 31 (4):370-377.
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  9.  21
    Godfrey N. A. Vesey (1963). Armstrong on Sensations of Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (August):250-254.
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  10.  6
    C. R. Bell & K. A. Provins (1963). Relations Between Physiological Responses to Environmental Heat and Time Judgments. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (6):572.
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  11.  10
    C. Strang (1961). The Perception of Heat. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 61:239-252.
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  12.  5
    James E. Birren, Roland C. Casperson & Jack Botwinick (1951). Pain Measurement by the Radiant Heat Method: Individual Differences in Pain Sensitivity, the Effects of Skin Temperature, and Stimulus Duration. Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (6):419.
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  13.  3
    Frank C. Leeming (1968). Response Rate as a Function of Magnitude and Schedule of Heat Reinforcement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (1p1):74.
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  14.  4
    E. C. Poulton & R. S. Edwards (1974). Interactions and Range Effects in Experiments on Pairs of Stresses: Mild Heat and Low-Frequency Noise. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (4):621.
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  15.  4
    A. H. Sullivan & D. J. Verda (1930). The Experiential Fusion of Warmth and Cold in Heat. Journal of Experimental Psychology 13 (2):208.
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  16. Ernst Mach & Brian Mcguinness (1986). Principles of the Theory of Heat Historically and Critically Elucidated. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  17.  2
    Warren H. Teichner (1957). Cutaneous Discrimination of Radiant Heat. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (6):438.
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  18.  2
    K. A. Provins & C. R. Bell (1970). Effects of Heat Stress on the Performance of Two Tasks Running Concurrently. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):40.
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  19. G. J. Goodfield (1975). The Growth of Scientific Physiology Physiological Method and the Mechanist-Vitalist Controversy, Illustrated by the Problems of Respiration and Animal Heat.
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  20.  91
    Peter L. Kellerman (1980). Heat Flow in Relativistic Equilibrium Thermodynamics. Foundations of Physics 10 (1-2):163-173.
    An attempt is made to clarify a thought experiment introduced by P. T. Landsberg concerning the relativistic heat flow between bodies in relative motion. It is shown that if the problem is analyzed within the covariant thermodynamics developed by R. Balescu, supplemented by the second law of thermodynamics as proposed here, then such heat flow considerations do not fix the transformation of temperature as Landsberg contends. Instead, the transformation of temperature is left as being purely a matter of (...)
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  21.  78
    O. Costa de Beauregard (1989). The Computer and the Heat Engine. Foundations of Physics 19 (6):725-727.
    Brillouin sees order as generated by tapping negentropy sources existing upstream, while Prigogine sees it as generated by dumping entropy downstream. Joining both ideas yields a picture of the computer closely paralleling that of Carnot's heat engine. The difference is that the one delivers information and the other, work. In either case the irretrievable (that is, by definition) loss occurs at the last step. Bennett and Landauer very rightly emphasize this, but their fixation on the condenser blinds them to (...)
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  22.  20
    Nicholas W. Best (2016). Lavoisier’s “Reflections on Phlogiston” II: On the Nature of Heat. Foundations of Chemistry 18 (1):3-13.
    Having refuted the phlogiston theory, Lavoisier uses this second portion of his essay to expound his new theory of combustion, based on the oxygen principle. He gives a mechanistic account of thermodynamic phenomena in terms of a subtle fluid and its ability to penetrate porous bodies. He uses this hypothetical fluid to explain volume changes, heat capacity and latent heat. Beyond the three types of combustion that he distinguishes and defines, Lavoisier also explains other chemical sources of (...), such as the heat of solution. (shrink)
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  23.  1
    Donald A. Brown & Tim Weiskel (2002). American Heat: Ethical Problems with the United States' Response to Global Warming. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In American Heat, Donald Brown critically analyzes the U.S. response to global warming, inviting readers to examine the implicit morality of the U.S position, and ultimately to help lead the world toward an equitable sharing of the burdens and benefits of protecting the global environment. In short, Brown argues that an ethical focus on global environmental matters is the key to achieving a globally acceptable solution.
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  24. D. Wade Hands (1992). More Light and Less Heat Mirowski on Economics and the Energy Metaphor. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 22 (1):97-111.
    Review Article on Mirowski's More Heat Than Light (1989).
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  25.  34
    Stathis Psillos (1994). A Philosophical Study of the Transition From the Caloric Theory of Heat to Thermodynamics: Resisting the Pessimistic Meta-Induction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (2):159-190.
    I began this study with Laudan's argument from the pessimistic induction and I promised to show that the caloric theory of heat cannot be used to support the premisses of the meta-induction on past scientific theories. I tried to show that the laws of experimental calorimetry, adiabatic change and Carnot's theory of the motive power of heat were (i) independent of the assumption that heat is a material substance, (ii) approximately true, (iii) deducible and accounted for within (...)
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  26.  61
    Isabelle Peschard & Michel Bitbol (2008). Heat, Temperature and Phenomenal Concepts. In Edmond Wright (ed.), The Case for Qualia. MIT Press 155.
    The reduction of the concept of heat to that of molecular kinetic energy is recurrently presented as lending analogical support to the project of reduction of phenomenal concepts to physical concepts. The claimed analogy draws on the way the use of the concept of heat is attached to the experience in first person of a certain sensation. The reduction of this concept seems to prove the possibility to reduce discourse involving phenomenal concepts to a scientific description of neural (...)
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  27. Chris Pincock, Conditions on the Use of the One-Dimensional Heat Equation.
    This paper explores the conditions under which scientists are warranted in adding the one-dimensional heat equation to their theories and then using the equation to describe particular physical situations. Summarizing these derivation and application conditions motivates an account of idealized scientific representation that relates the use of mathematics in science to interpretative questions about scientific theories.
     
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  28.  1
    Martin Hilbert (2010). Herschel's Investigation of the Nature of Radiant Heat: The Limitations of Experiment. Annals of Science 56 (4):357-378.
    Herschel's experiments on radiant heat are analysed to see how he understood the role of experiment and how he handled potential difficulties in measurement. He believed that experiments could answer essential questions about nature and was willing to change his mind in light of evidence. Potential problems with data did not shake his confidence in the results of his experiments. Herschel's critic, Leslie, had even less patience with experimental results that did not fit his theory. His harsh condemnations of (...)
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  29.  21
    Griet Galle (2003). Scholastic Explanations of Why Local Motion Generates Heat. Early Science and Medicine 8 (4):336-370.
    Several medieval commentators on De caelo II, 7 investigate the question of whether local motion causes heat. I analyse the theories of Averroes, Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Peter of Auvergne, John of Jandun, John Buridan and Nicole Oresme and two anonymous theories. Although all of these authors agree that local motion generates heat, each of them presents his own explanation of the heating effect of motion. Averroes, Thomas Aquinas, John of Jandun and John Buridan argue that motion (...)
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  30.  31
    Ioannis Votsis, Heat in Inter-Theory Relations.
    In scientific realist eyes we are only warranted to assert that a theory is true or approximately true if that theory enjoys considerable explanatory and predictive success. The most well known challenge to this claim, the pessimistic meta-induction, holds that the history of science is replete with successful theories that are now considered false. In effect, this challenge raises doubts about the reliability of inferences from explanatory and predictive success to (approximate) truth. The main realist reaction has been to argue (...)
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  31.  84
    Gad Freudenthal (1995). Aristotle's Theory of Material Substance: Heat and Pneuma, Form and Soul. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers an original new account of one of Aristotle's central doctrines. Freudenthal He recreates from Aristotle's writings a more complete theory of material substance which is able to explain the problematical areas of the way matter organizes itself and the persistence of matter, to show that the hitherto ignored concept of vital heat is as central in explaining material substance as soul or form.
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  32.  5
    Joyce Carol Oates (1987). Soul at the White Heat: The Romance of Emily Dickinson's Poetry. Critical Inquiry 13 (4):806-824.
    Emily Dickinson is the most paradoxical of poets: the very poet of paradox. By way of voluminous biographical material, not to mention the extraordinary intimacy of her poetry, it would seem that we know everything about her; yet the common experience of reading her work, particularly if the poems are read sequentially, is that we come away seeming to know nothing. We could recognize her inimitable voice anywhere—in the “prose” of her letters no less than in her poetry—yet it is (...)
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  33.  4
    Victor Boantza (2008). The Phlogistic Role of Heat in the Chemical Revolution and the Origins of Kirwan's 'Ingenious Modifications… Into the Theory of Phlogiston'. Annals of Science 65 (3):309-338.
    Summary Contrary to common belief, Lavoisier's greatest phlogistic rival was not Joseph Priestley but Richard Kirwan, a fact that was firmly recognized by both the Lavoisians as well as Priestley himself. During the 1780s, which saw the unprecedented rise of the chemistry of air(s), Kirwan's ?ingenious modifications?into the theory of phlogiston?, in Mme. Lavoisier's words, became the most dominant alternative to the revisionist pneumatic interpretations of the French. A genealogical contextualization of Kirwan's phlogistic contributions, the circumstances of their emergence and (...)
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  34.  1
    Stephen Brush (1970). The Wave Theory of Heat: A Forgotten Stage in the Transition From the Caloric Theory to Thermodynamics. British Journal for the History of Science 5 (2):145-167.
    Research on thermal “black-body” radiation played an essential role in the origin of the quantum theory at the beginning of the twentieth century. This is a well-known fact, but historians of science up to now have not generally recognized that studies of radiant heat were also important in an earlier episode in the development of modern physics: the transition from caloric theory to thermodynamics. During the period 1830–50, many physicists were led by these studies to accept a “wave theory (...)
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  35.  8
    Giulio Casati (1986). Energy Transport and the Fourier Heat Law in Classical Systems. Foundations of Physics 16 (1):51-61.
    The energy transport in one-dimensional nonlinear systems is discussed. By numerically studying a model system, we verify the Fourier heat law on purely dynamical grounds and we compute the coefficient of thermal conductivity K. The same value ofK is independently obtained by use of the Green-Kubo formalism.
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  36.  12
    Bruce Clarke (2011). Victorian Bodies in Heat. Metascience 20 (2):325-328.
    Victorian bodies in heat Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9489-x Authors Bruce Clarke, Department of English, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-3091, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  37.  2
    Cheryl C. Macpherson & Muge Akpinar-Elci (2015). Caribbean Heat Threatens Health, Well-Being and the Future of Humanity. Public Health Ethics 8 (2):196-208.
    Climate change has substantial impacts on public health and safety, disease risks and the provision of health care, with the poor being particularly disadvantaged. Management of the associated health risks and changing health service requirements requires adequate responses at local levels. Health-care providers are central to these responses. While climate change raises ethical questions about its causes, impacts and social justice, medicine and bioethics typically focus on individual patients and research participants rather than these broader issues. We broaden this focus (...)
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  38.  11
    Tjard Cock Buning (1985). Qualitative and Quantitative Explanation of the Forms of Heat Sensitive Organs in Snakes. Acta Biotheoretica 34 (2-4).
    Heat sensitive pit organs in different species of snakes show various shapes. The relation between form characters and functions were analysed by means of two different research programs. This paper presents the methodological steps involved in these research programs. The first approach is called a qualitative explanation because it connects experimental data by means of qualitative statements in order to give a functional morphological explanation for the construction of the pits in respect to the behaviour of the snake. The (...)
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  39.  9
    J. Viret, L. Tela, F. Canini & L. Bourdon (2000). Hydrodynamic Model of Heat Stroke. Acta Biotheoretica 48 (3-4):259-272.
    This work presents an hydrodynamical model of heat stroke, which is a physiopathological state of stress, due to an exposure of animals to an ambient temperature of approximatively 40°C during two hours. The evolution of body temperature during this stress process is characterised by three phases. A first phase of increase is followed by a plateau which occurs before a second phase of increase which can be lethal. The model is based on the analogy of a boat progressively caught (...)
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  40.  2
    Chen Xiaoya (1998). Perspective on the "Old Three Classes Culture Heat". Contemporary Chinese Thought 29 (4):50-62.
    With the advent of the 1990s, a "Mao Zedong Heat" emerged spectacularly on the Chinese mainland. And when this heat current apparently lost momentum, another trend followed in its wake: the "Old Three Classes Culture Heat," which has quietly risen in recent years.
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  41.  3
    D. L. Simms (2004). Newton's Contribution to the Science of Heat. Annals of Science 61 (1):33-77.
    The contents of Scala Graduum Caloris are described, supplemented by unpublished material. Both temperature measurements by his linseed oil thermometer and those based upon his law of cooling are shown to be reasonably accurate to 300°C, but above that value they are much too low. The apparent agreement and the deviation are explained by the differences between the assumptions that Newton made in deriving his law of cooling and the conditions in which he used it. Newton's attempts to link terrestrial (...)
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  42.  3
    Luciano Boschiero (2010). Natural Philosophical Contention Inside the Accademia Del Cimento: The Properties and Effects of Heat and Cold. Annals of Science 60 (4):329-349.
    Although historians have often believed that the Accademia del Cimento was as an exemplar of early modern experimental science, study of its unpublished letters and manuscripts reveals a different story. Instead of devoting themselves to the practice of an experimental method, the Cimento academicians seemed dedicated only to constructing experiments that could be interpreted in favour of their natural philosophical aims and interests. For example, their experiments pertaining to the properties and effects of heat and cold show an institution (...)
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  43.  2
    M. D. Kirby (1986). AIDS Legislation--Turning Up the Heat? Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (4):187-194.
    This paper is not about the medical condition of AIDS. Nor is it about the history of the condition since it was first reported in Atlanta, Georgia in 1981. It looks rather, at the catalogue of legislative and other legal responses to the spread of AIDS. The paper analyses the AIDS condition in its historical context. The hysteria accompanying the outbreak of AIDS is contrasted with the similar hysteria associated with other previous epidemics experienced in Australia over the past two (...)
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  44.  1
    E. L. Scott (2006). Richard Kirwan, J. H. De Magellan, and the Early History of Specific Heat. Annals of Science 38 (2):141-153.
    In the spring of 1780 there appeared a short work by J. H. de Magellan, published in London but written in French, which contained the first table of specific heats to appear in print. Magellan attributed the table to Richard Kirwan, but in none of his published works does Kirwan refer to it, so that the circumstances of its compilation are obscure. Kirwan's correspondence, however, provides evidence both of his association with Magellan and of his long concern with theories of (...)
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  45. Gad Freudenthal (1999). Aristotle's Theory of Material Substance: Heat and Pneuma, Form and Soul. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Gad Freudenthal offers an original new account of one of Aristotle's central doctrines, his theory of material substance. Freudenthal argues that Aristotle's concept of heat is a crucial but hitherto ignored part of this account. Aristotle's 'canonical', four-element theory of matter fails to explain the coming-to-be of material substances and their persistence. Interpreters have highlighted Aristotle's claim that soul is the active cause of the coming-to-be and persistence of living beings. On the basis of dispersed remarks in Aristotle's writings (...)
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  46. Alexander V. Evteev, Elena V. Levchenko, Irina V. Belova & Graeme E. Murch (2015). Two-Fluid Nature of Phonon Heat Conduction in a Monatomic Lattice. Philosophical Magazine 95 (23):2571-2595.
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  47. Elena V. Levchenko, Alexander V. Evteev, Leila Momenzadeh, Irina V. Belova & Graeme E. Murch (2015). Phonon-Mediated Heat Dissipation in a Monatomic Lattice: Case Study on Ni. Philosophical Magazine 95 (32):3640-3673.
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  48.  46
    Ameur Dhahri (2009). Low Density Limit and the Quantum Langevin Equation for the Heat Bath. In Institute of Physics Krzysztof Stefanski (ed.), Open Systems and Information Dynamics. World Scientific Publishing Company 16--04.
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  49.  38
    Bruno Carazza & Helge Kragh (1989). Adolfo Bartoli and the Problem of Radiant Heat. Annals of Science 46 (2):183-194.
    In 1876 the Italian physicist and physical chemist Adolfo Bartoli discussed a thought experiment in which he connected the second law of thermodynamics with the hypothetical pressure of radiation. Bartoli's work, published in Italian, exerted some influence on the subsequent development of black-body theory and light pressure research. This influence was mainly due to Boltzmann, who came to the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law via a reworking of Bartoli's thought experiment. However, contrary to what is usually assumed, Bartoli was himself reluctant to (...)
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  50.  41
    Heinz Otto Sibum (1995). Reworking the Mechanical Value of Heat: Instruments of Precision and Gestures of Accuracy in Early Victorian England. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (1):73-106.
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