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  1. Heather J. Gert, Linda Radzik & and Michael Hand (2004). Hampton on the Expressive Power of Punishment. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1):79–90.
    In her later writings Jean Hampton develops an expressive theory of punishment she takes to be retributivist. Unlike Feinberg, Hampton claims wrongdoings as well as punishments are expressive. Wrongdoings assert that the victim is less valuable than victimizer. On her view we are obligated to punish because we are obligated to respond to this false assertion. Punishment expresses the moral truth that victim and wrongdoer are equally valuable. We argue that Hampton's argument would work only if she held that exerting (...)
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  2. Heather J. Gert, Linda Radzik & Michael Hand (2004). Hampton on the Expressive Power of Punishment. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1):79-90.
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  3. Heather J. Gert (2003). Review: Wittgenstein's Copernican Revolution: The Question of Linguistic Idealism. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (447):526-528.
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  4. Heather J. Gert (2002). Avoiding Surprises: A Model for Informing Patients. Hastings Center Report 32 (5):23-32.
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  5. Heather J. Gert (2002). The Standard Meter by Any Name is Still a Meter Long. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):50-68.
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  6. Keith Burgess‐Jackson, Cheshire Calhoun, Susan Finsen, Chad W. Flanders, Heather J. Gert, Peter G. Heckman, John Kelsay, Michael Lavin, Michelle Y. Little, Lionel K. McPherson, Alfred Nordmann, Kirk Pillow, Ruth J. Sample, Edward D. Sherline, Hans O. Tiefel, Thomas S. Tomlinson, Steven Walt, Patricia H. Werhane, Edward C. Wingebach & Christopher F. Zurn (2001). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (1):189-201.
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  7. Heather J. Gert (2001). Two Ways to Teach Premedical Students the Ethical Value of Discussion and Information Gathering. Teaching Philosophy 24 (3):233-240.
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  8. Heather J. Gert (2000). The Contiguity of Wittgenstein's Thought. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):240-242.
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  9. Heather J. Gert (1999). The Death Penalty and Victims' Rights: Legal Advance Directives. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (4):457-473.
  10. Heather J. Gert (1998). Coming to Our Senses. Philosophical Review 107 (1):123-125.
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  11. Heather J. Gert (1998). Anger and Chess. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):249-265.
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  12. Heather J. Gert (1997). Wittgenstein on Description. Philosophical Studies 88 (3):221-243.
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  13. Heather J. Gert (1995). Alternative Analyses. Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):31-37.
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  14. Heather J. Gert (1995). Family Resemblances and Criteria. Synthese 105 (2):177-190.
    In §66 ofPhilosophical Investigations Wittgenstein looks for something common to various games and finds only an interconnecting network of resemblances. These are family resemblances. Sympathetic as well as unsympathetic readers have interpreted him as claiming that games form a family in virtue of these resemblances. This assumes Wittgenstein inverted the relation between being a member of a family and bearing family resemblances to others of that family. (The Churchills bear family resemblances to one another because they belong to the same (...)
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  15. Heather J. Gert (1995). Souren Teghrarian, Ed., Wittgenstein and Contemporary Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (4):294-296.
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  16. Heather J. Gert (1995). Viability. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 3 (1):133 – 142.
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  17. Heather J. Gert (1990). Rights and Rights Violators: A New Approach to the Nature of Rights. Journal of Philosophy 87 (12):688-694.
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