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  1. Darrel Moellendorf & Heather Widdows (forthcoming). Global Ethics: A Short Reflection on Then and Now. Journal of Global Ethics:1-7.
    Ten years on from the first issue of the Journal of Global Ethics, Darrel Moellendorf and Heather Widdows reflect on the current state of research in global ethics. To do this, they summarise a recent comprehensive road map of the field and provide a map of research by delineating the topics and approaches of leading scholars of global ethics collected together in the recently published Routledge Handbook of Global Ethics which they have co-edited. Topics fall under issues of war, conflict (...)
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  2. Darrel Moellendorf & Heather Widdows (eds.) (forthcoming). Handbook of Global Ethics.
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  3. Herjeet Marway, Sarah-Louise Johnson & Heather Widdows, Commodification of Human Tissue. Handbook of Global Bioethics.
    Commodification is a broad and crosscutting issue that spans debates in ethics (from prostitution to global market practices) and bioethics (from the sale of body parts to genetic enhancement). There has been disagreement, however, over what constitutes commodification, whether it is happening, and whether it is of ethical import. This chapter focuses on one area of the discussion in bioethics – the commodification of human tissue – and addresses these questions – about the characteristics of commodification, its pervasiveness, and ethical (...)
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  4. Darrel Moellendorf & Heather Widdows (eds.) (2014). The Routledge Handbook of Global Ethics. Routledge.
    Global ethics focuses on the most pressing contemporary ethical issues - poverty, global trade, terrorism, torture, pollution, climate change and the management of scarce recourses. It draws on moral and political philosophy, political and social science, empirical research, and real world policy and activism. The Routledge Handbook of Global Ethics brings together leading international scholars to present concise and authoritative overviews of the most significant issues and ideas in global ethics. The essays are structured into six key topics: normative theory; (...)
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  5. Heather Widdows (2013). The Connected Self: The Ethics and Governance of the Genetic Individual. Cambridge University Press.
    The individual self and its critics -- The individualist assumptions of bioethical frameworks -- The genetic self is the connected self -- The failures of individual ethics in the genetic era -- The communal turn -- Developing alternatives: benefit sharing -- Developing alternatives: trust -- The ethical toolbox part one: recognising goods and harms -- The ethical toolbox part two: applying appropriate practices -- Possible futures.
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  6. Heather Widdows & Peter G. N. West-Oram (2013). Revising Global Theories of Justice to Include Public Goods. Journal of Global Ethics 9 (2):227 - 243.
    Our aim in this paper is to suggest that most current theories of global justice fail to adequately recognise the importance of global public goods. Broadly speaking, this failing can be attributed at least in part to the complexity of the global context, the individualistic focus of most theories of justice, and the localised nature of the theoretical foundations of most theories of global justice. We argue ? using examples (particularly that of protecting antibiotic efficacy) ? that any truly effective (...)
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  7. Peter Gn West-Oram & Heather Widdows, Global Population and Global Justice: Equitable Distribution of Resources Among Countries. The Electronic Library of Science.
    Analysing the demands of global justice for the distribution of resources is a complex task and requires consideration of a broad range of issues. Of particular relevance is the effect that different distributions will have on global population growth and individual welfare. Since changes in the consumption and distribution of resources can have major effects on the welfare of the global population, and the rate at which it increases, it is important to establish meaningful principles to ensure a just distribution (...)
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  8. Lisa Bortolotti & Heather Widdows (2011). The Right Not to Know: The Case of Psychiatric Disorders. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):673-676.
    This paper will consider the right not to know in the context of psychiatric disorders. It will outline the arguments for and against acquiring knowledge about the results of genetic testing for conditions such as breast cancer and Huntington’s disease, and examine whether similar considerations apply to disclosing to clients the results of genetic testing for psychiatric disorders such as depression and Alzheimer’s disease. The right not to know will also be examined in the context of the diagnosis of psychiatric (...)
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  9. Heather Widdows (2011). Localized Past, Globalized Future: Towards an Effective Bioethical Framework Using Examples From Population Genetics and Medical Tourism. Bioethics 25 (2):83-91.
    This paper suggests that many of the pressing dilemmas of bioethics are global and structural in nature. Accordingly, global ethical frameworks are required which recognize the ethically significant factors of all global actors. To this end, ethical frameworks must recognize the rights and interests of both individuals and groups (and the interrelation of these). The paper suggests that the current dominant bioethical framework is inadequate to this task as it is over-individualist and therefore unable to give significant weight to the (...)
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  10. Heather Widdows (2011). Western and Eastern Principles and Globalised Bioethics. Asian Bioethics Review 3 (1):14-22.
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  11. Heather Widdows & Sean Cordell (2011). The Ethics of Biobanking: Key Issues and Controversies. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (3):207-219.
    The ethics of biobanking is one of the most controversial issues in current bioethics and public health debates. For some, biobanks offer the possibility of unprecedented advances which will revolutionise research and improve the health of future generations. For others they are worrying repositories of personal information and tissue which will be used without sufficient respect for those from whom they came. Wherever one stands on this spectrum, from an ethics perspective biobanks are revolutionary. Traditional ethical safeguards of informed consent (...)
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  12. Sean Cordell & Heather Widdows (2010). En Busca de Un Marco Efectivo Para Los Biobancos. Dilemata 4 (2):15-31.
    This paper is about the actual and potential development of an ethics that is appropriate to the practices and institutions of biobanking, the question being how best to develop a framework within which the relevant ethical questions are first identified and then addressed in the right ways. It begins with ways in which a standard approach in bioethics – namely upholding a principle of indivi-dual autonomy via the practice of gaining donors’ informed consent – is an inadequate ethical framework for (...)
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  13. Heather Widdows & Sean Cordell (2010). En Busca de Un Marco Efectivo Para Los Biobancos. Dilemata 4.
    This paper is about the actual and potential development of an ethics that is appropriate to the practices and institutions of biobanking, the question being how best to develop a framework within which the relevant ethical questions are first identified and then addressed in the right ways. It begins with ways in which a standard approach in bioethics – namely upholding a principle of indivi-dual autonomy via the practice of gaining donors’ informed consent – is an inadequate ethical framework for (...)
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  14. Heather Widdows (2009). Border Disputes Across Bodies: Exploitation in Trafficking for Prostitution and Egg Sale for Stem Cell Research. Ijfab 2 (1):5--24.
    In recent decades, debates about exploitation have tended to be subsumed by debates about choice and autonomy. This phenomenon has affected international feminism adversely, creating polarized debates over such issues as prostitution. Equally grave is the more recent tendency, even among some feminists, to assume that a woman's free choice to accept payment for egg ``donation'' in somatic cell nuclear transfer stem cell research absolves researchers of any charge of exploitation or abuse of research subjects. This paper suggests that much (...)
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  15. Heather Widdows (2009). Murdochian Evil and Striving to Be Good. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  16. Heather Widdows (2009). Persons and Their Parts: New Reproductive Technologies and Risks of Commodification. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 17 (1):36-46.
    This paper explores one aspect of the social implications of new reproductive technologies, namely, the impact such technologies have on our understandings of family structures and our expectations of children. In particular it considers whether the possibilities afforded by such technologies result in a more contractual and commodified understanding of children. To do this the paper outlines the possibilities afforded by NRTs and their commodificatory tendencies; second, it explores the commodification debate using the somewhat parallel example of commodification of organs; (...)
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  17. Iain Law & Heather Widdows (2008). Conceptualising Health: Insights From the Capability Approach. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):303-314.
    This paper suggests the adoption of a ‘capability approach’ to key concepts in healthcare. Recent developments in theoretical approaches to concepts such as ‘health’ and ‘disease’ are discussed, and a trend identified of thinking of health as a matter of having the capability to cope with life’s demands. This approach is contrasted with the WHO definition of health and Boorse’s biostatistical account. We outline the ‘capability approach’, which has become standard in development ethics and economics, and show how existing work (...)
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  18. Christien van den Anker, Sirkku Hellsten & Heather Widdows (2007). First Page Preview. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (3).
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  19. Heather Widdows (2007). Conceptualising the Self in the Genetic Era. Health Care Analysis 15 (1):5-12.
    This paper addresses the impact of genetic advances and understandings on our concept of the self and the individual. In particular it focuses on conceptions of the ‘autonomous individual’ in the post-Enlightenment tradition and in bioethics. It considers the ascendancy of the autonomous individual as the model of the self and describes the erosion of substantial concepts of the self and the reduction of the self to “the will”—with the accompanying values of freedom, choice and autonomy. This conception of the (...)
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  20. Heather Widdows (2007). Is Global Ethics Moral Neo-Colonialism? An Investigation of the Issue in the Context of Bioethics. Bioethics 21 (6):305–315.
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  21. Heather Widdows (2005). Global Ethics, American Foreign Policy and the Academic as Activist: An Interview with Noam Chomsky. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):197 – 205.
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  22. Heather Widdows (2004). Religion as a Moral Source: Can Religion Function as a Shared Source of Moral Authority and Values in a Liberal Democracy? Heythrop Journal 45 (2):197–208.
  23. Heather Widdows, Donna Dickenson & Sirkku Hellsten (2003). Global Bioethics. New Review of Bioethics 1 (1):101-116.
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