Search results for 'Hebrew language Roots' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David Patterson (2005). Hebrew Language and Jewish Thought. Routledgecurzon.score: 131.0
    What makes Jewish thought Jewish? This book proceeds from a view of the Hebrew language as the holy tongue; such a view of Hebrew is, indeed, a distinctively Jewish view as determined by the Jewish religious tradition. Because language shapes thought and Hebrew is the foundational language of Jewish texts, this book explores the idea that Jewish thought is distinguished by concepts and categories rooted in Hebrew. Drawing on more than 300 Hebrew (...)
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  2. David Patterson (2012). Genocide in Jewish Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    1. Introduction: a name, not an essence -- 2. Why Jewish thought and what makes it Jewish? -- 3. Deadly philosophical abstraction -- 4. The stranger in your midst -- 5. Nefesh: the soul as flesh and blood -- 6. The environmentalist contribution to genocide -- 7. Torture -- 8. Hunger and homelessness -- 9. Philosophy, religion, and genocide -- 10. A concluding reflection on body and soul.
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  3. John Spackman (2006). The Tiantai Roots of Dōgen's Philosophy of Language and Thought. Philosophy East and West 56 (3):428-450.score: 48.0
    : Many recent studies of Dōgen have rightly emphasized that for Dōgen language and thought are capable of expressing the buddha dharma. But they have not recognized that this positive assessment of language rests on an underlying critique of the prevalent commonsense view that language functions by representing an independent reality. Focusing on Dōgen's use of apparently paradoxical language, it is suggested that in order to understand this critique we need to trace it back to its (...)
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  4. Frank Schalow (1998). Language and the Social Roots of Conscience: Heidegger's Less Traveled Path. [REVIEW] Human Studies 21 (2):141-156.score: 48.0
    This paper develops a new interpretation of Heidegger's concept of conscience in order to show to what extent his thought establishes the possibility of civil disobedience. The origin of conscience lies in the self's appropriation of language as inviting a reciprocal response of the other (person). By developing the social dimension of dialogue, it is showsn that conscience reveals the self in its capacity for dissent, free speech, and civil disobedience. By developing the social roots of conscience, a (...)
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  5. Douglas J. Glick (2012). Language Contextualization in a Hebrew Language Television Interview: Lessons From a Semiotic Return to Context. Semiotica 2012 (192).score: 42.0
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  6. Brian L. Lancaster (2000). On the Relationship Between Cognitive Models and Spiritual Maps. Evidence From Hebrew Language Mysticism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):11-12.score: 42.0
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  7. Enrico Lucca (2013). " On the Edge of the Abyss": Scholem and Rosenzweig on the Hebrew Language. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 68 (2):305-320.score: 42.0
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  8. Michael Tomasello (1996). The Cultural Roots of Language. In B. Velichkovsky & Duane M. Rumbaugh (eds.), Communicating Meaning: The Evolution and Development of Language. Hillsdale, Nj: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 275--307.score: 39.0
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  9. Karl A. Kottman (1975). Fray Luis de León and the Universality of Hebrew: An Aspect of 16th and 17th Century Language Theory. Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (3):297-310.score: 36.0
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  10. Kathleen Wermke & Werner Mende (2006). Melody as a Primordial Legacy From Early Roots of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):300-300.score: 36.0
    The stormy development of vocal production during the first postnatal weeks is generally underestimated. Our longitudinal studies revealed an amazingly fast unfolding and combinatorial complexification of pre-speech melodies. We argue that relying on “melody” could provide for the immature brain a kind of filter to extract life-relevant information from the complex speech stream.
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  11. Shaul Katz (2004). Berlin Roots Zionist Incarnation: The Ethos of Pure Mathematics and the Beginnings of the Einstein Institute of Mathematics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Science in Context 17 (1-2):199-234.score: 36.0
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  12. Gisela Shaw (1978). Heidegger's Philosophy of Language in 'Being and Time' and Its Philosophical-Theological Roots. Philosophy and History 11 (2):174-174.score: 36.0
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  13. Mark Aronoff, Irit Meir, Carol Padden & Wendy Sandler (2008). The Roots of Linguistic Organization in a New Language. Interaction Studies 9 (1):133.score: 36.0
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  14. Naomi S. Baron (1985). The Roots of Language. New Vico Studies 3:220-226.score: 36.0
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  15. Iris Berent, Vered Vaknin & Gary F. Marcus (2007). Roots, Stems, and the Universality of Lexical Representations: Evidence From Hebrew. Cognition 104 (2):254-286.score: 36.0
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  16. L. Lotito (1993). The Romantic Roots of Weininger, Otto Symbolic Language. Filosofia 44 (3):433-455.score: 36.0
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  17. John Myhill (1997). What is Universal and What is Language-Specific in Emotion Words?: Evidence From Biblical Hebrew. Pragmatics and Cognition 5 (1):79-129.score: 36.0
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  18. Jordi Redondo (forthcoming). The Greek Literary Language of the Hebrew Historian Josephus. Hermes.score: 36.0
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  19. Eyal Chowers (2011). The Political Philosophy of Zionism: Trading Jewish Words for an Hebraic Land. Cambridge University Press.score: 31.0
    Jews and the temporal imaginations of modernity -- The Zionist temporal revolution -- The End of building -- Hebrew and politics.
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  20. Eleazar ben Judah (2004). Sefer Sode Razaya: ʻarukh Me-Ḥadash ʻa. P. Kit. Y. ... ; Sefer Ha-Shem. Mekhon "Sode Razaya".score: 28.0
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  21. Eleazar ben Judah (2004). Sefer Sode Razaya: ʻarukh Me-Ḥadash ʻa. Mekhon "Sode Razaya".score: 28.0
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  22. Simḥah[from old catalog] Raz (1973). Ben Adam La-Ḥavero.score: 28.0
     
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  23. Mostyn W. Jones (1994). The Roots of Imagination. Dissertation, The University of Manchesterscore: 27.0
    This work presents a new theory of imagination which tries to overcome the overly narrow perpectives that current theories take upon this enigmatic, multi-faceted phenomenon. Current theories are narrowly preoccupied with images and imagery. This creates problems in explaining (1) what imagination is, (2) how it works, and (3) what its strengths and limitations are. (1) Ordinary language identifies imagination with both imaging (image-making) and creativity, but most current theories identify imagination narrowly with imaging while neglecting creativity. Yet imaging (...)
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  24. Marcello Barbieri (2010). On the Origin of Language. Biosemiotics 3 (2):201-223.score: 27.0
    Thomas Sebeok and Noam Chomsky are the acknowledged founding fathers of two research fields which are known respectively as Biosemiotics and Biolinguistics and which have been developed in parallel during the past 50 years. Both fields claim that language has biological roots and must be studied as a natural phenomenon, thus bringing to an end the old divide between nature and culture. In addition to this common goal, there are many other important similarities between them. Their definitions of (...)
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  25. Avner Baz (2012). When Words Are Called For: A Defense of Ordinary Language Philosophy. Harvard University Press.score: 27.0
    The basic conflict: an initial characterization -- The main arguments against ordinary language philosophy -- Must philosophers rely on intuitions? -- Contextualism and the burden of knowledge -- Contextualism, anti-contextualism, and knowing as being in a position to give assurance -- Conclusion: skepticism and the dialectic of (semantically pure) "knowledge" -- Epilogue: ordinary language philosophy, Kant, and the roots of antinomial thinking.
     
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  26. Masami Ito & Gerhard Lischke (2007). Corrigendum to “Generalized Periodicity and Primitivity for Words”. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 53 (6):642-643.score: 25.3
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  27. Mark Schroeder (2012). Philosophy of Language for Metaethics. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Metaethics is the study of metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language, insofar as they relate to the subject matter of moral or, more broadly, normative discourse – the subject matter of what is good, bad, right or wrong, just, reasonable, rational, what we must or ought to do, or otherwise. But out of these four ‘core’ areas of philosophy, it is plausibly the philosophy of language that is most central to metaethics – and (...)
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  28. Peter Carruthers (1998). Conscious Thinking: Language or Elimination? Mind and Language 13 (4):457-476.score: 21.0
    Do we conduct our conscious propositional thinking in natural language? Or is such language only peripherally related to human conscious thought-processes? In this paper I shall present a partial defence of the former view, by arguing that the only real alternative is eliminativism about conscious propositional thinking. Following some introductory remarks, I shall state the argument for this conclusion, and show how that conclusion can be true. Thereafter I shall defend each of the three main premises in turn.
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  29. Barry C. Smith (2006). What I Know When I Know a Language. In Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    EVERY speaker of a language knows a bewildering variety of linguistic facts, and will come to know many more. It is knowledge that connects sound and meaning. Questions about the nature of this knowledge cannot be separated from fundamental questions about the nature of language. The conception of language we should adopt depends on the part it plays in explaining our knowledge of language. This chapter explores options in accounting for language, and our knowledge of (...)
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  30. Mark Lance & Rebecca Kukla, Perception, Language, and the First Person.score: 21.0
    Pragmatism has enjoyed a major resurgence in Anglo-American philosophy over the course of the last decade or two, and Robert Brandom’s work – particularly his 1994 tome Making it Explicit (MIE) – has been at the vanguard of this resurgence (Brandom 1994).2 But pragmatism comes in several surprisingly distinct flavours. Authors such as Hubert Dreyfus find their roots in certain parts of Heidegger and in phenomenologists such as Merleau-Ponty, and they privilege embodied, preconceptual skills as opposed to discursive practices (...)
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  31. Christopher D. Viger (2005). Learning to Think: A Response to the Language of Thought Argument for Innateness. Mind and Language 20 (3):313-25.score: 21.0
    Jerry Fodor's argument for an innate language of thought continues to be a hurdle for researchers arguing that natural languages provide us with richer conceptual systems than our innate cognitive resources. I argue that because the logical/formal terms of natural languages are given a usetheory of meaning, unlike predicates, logical/formal terms might be learned without a mediating internal representation. In that case, our innate representational system might have less logical structure than a natural language, making it possible that (...)
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  32. Roger Foster (2007). Adorno and Heidegger on Language and the Inexpressible. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (2):187-204.score: 21.0
    I argue that the reflections on language in Adorno and Heidegger have their common root in a modernist problematic that dissected experience into ordinary experience, and transfiguring experiences that are beyond the capacity for expression of our language. I argue that Adorno’s solution to this problem is the more resolutely “modernist” one, in that Adorno is more rigorous about preserving the distinction between what can be said, and what strives for expression in language. After outlining the definitive (...)
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  33. Roger M. White (2009). Talking About God: The Concept of Analogy and the Problem of Religious Language. Ashgate Pub. Ltd..score: 21.0
    Introduction -- The mathematical roots of the concept of analogy -- Aristotle : the uses of analogy -- Aristotle : analogy and language -- Thomas Aquinas -- Immanuel Kant -- Karl Barth -- Final reflections.
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  34. Eugen Fischer (2014). Verbal Fallacies and Philosophical Intuitions: The Continuing Relevance of Ordinary Language Analysis. In Brian Garvey (ed.), Austin on Language. Palgrave Macmillan. 124-140.score: 21.0
    The paper builds on a methodological idea from experimental philosophy and on findings from psycholinguistics, to develop and defend ordinary language analysis (OLA) as practiced in J.L. Austin’s Sense and Sensibilia. That attack on sense-datum theories of perception focuses on the argument from illusion. Through a case-study on this paradoxical argument, the present paper argues for a form of OLA which is psychologically informed, seeks to expose epistemic, rather than semantic, defects in paradoxical arguments, and is immune to the (...)
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  35. Holger Andreas (2010). Semantic Holism in Scientific Language. Philosophy of Science 77 (4):524-543.score: 21.0
    Whether meaning is compositional has been a major issue in linguistics and formal philosophy of language for the last 2 decades. Semantic holism is widely and plausibly considered as an objection to the principle of semantic compositionality therein. It comes as a surprise that the holistic peculiarities of scientific language have been rarely addressed in formal accounts so far, given that semantic holism has its roots in the philosophy of science. For this reason, a model-theoretic approach to (...)
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  36. Willard V. Quine (1997). The Flowering of Thought in Language. In John M. Preston (ed.), Thought and Language. New York: Cambridge University Press. 171-.score: 21.0
    PHILOSOPHY Supplement: 42 Pages: 171-176 Published: 1997 Conference: Annual Conference of the Royal-Institute-of-Philosophy Location: UNIV READING, READING, ENGLAND Date: SEP , 1996 Sponsor(s): Royal Inst Philos Accession Number: WOS:000071935500009 Document Type: Article; Proceedings Paper Language: English Reprint Address: Quine, WV (reprint author), Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Addresses: 1. Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 40 WEST 20TH STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10011-4211 USA Web of Science Category: Philosophy Subject Category: Philosophy IDS Number: YW440 (...)
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  37. Machiel Keestra & Stephen Cowley (2009). Foundationalism and Neuroscience; Silence and Language. Language Sciences 31:531-552.score: 21.0
    Neuroscience offers more than new empirical evidence about the details of cognitive functions such as language, perception and action. Since it also shows many functions to be highly distributed, interconnected and dependent on mechanisms at different levels of processing, it challenges concepts that are traditionally used to describe these functions. The question is how to accommodate these concepts to the recent evidence. A recent proposal, made in Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience (2003) by Bennett and Hacker, is that concepts play (...)
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  38. Jaroslav Peregrin (2011). The Use-Theory of Meaning and the Rules of Our Language Games. In K. Turner (ed.), Making semantics pragmatic. Emerald.score: 21.0
    While most theoreticians of meaning in the first half of the twentieth century subscribed to a representational theory (viewing meanings as entities stood for by the expressions), the second half of the century was marked by the rise of various versions of use-theories of meaning. The roots of this ‘pragmatist turn’ are detectable in the writings of the later Wittgenstein, the Oxford speech act theorists (Austin, Grice) and the American neopragmatists (Quine, Sellars). Though it is now rather popular (and (...)
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  39. Peter Ives (2005). Language, Agency and Hegemony: A Gramscian Response to Post‐Marxism. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (4):455-468.score: 21.0
    Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe have attempted to save the concept of ?hegemony? from its economistic and essentialist Marxist roots by incorporating the linguistic influences of post?structuralist theory. Their major Marxist detractors criticise their trajectory as a ?descent into discourse? ? a decay from well?grounded, material reality into the idealistic and problematic realm of language and discourse. Both sides of the debate seem to agree on one thing: the line from Marxism to post?Marxism is the line from the (...)
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  40. Nicholas F. Gier & Johnson Petta (2007). Hebrew and Buddhist Selves: A Constructive Postmodern Study. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):47 – 64.score: 21.0
    Our task will be to demonstrate that there are instructive parallels between Hebrew and Buddhist concepts of self. There are at least five main constituents (skandhas in Sanskrit) of the Hebrew self: (1) nepe as living being; (2) rah as indwelling spirit; (3) lb as heart-mind; (4) bāār as flesh; and (5) dām as blood. We will compare these with the five Buddhist skandhas: disposition (samskāra), consciousness (vijñāna), feeling (vedanā), perception (samjñā), and body (rpa). Generally, what we will (...)
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  41. Y. Tzvi Langermann (1996). Arabic Writings in Hebrew Manuscripts: A Preliminary Relisting. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 6 (01):137-.score: 21.0
    For many centuries Jews in Arabic-speaking lands have transcribed books written by non-Jews into the Hebrew alphabet; the language remains Arabic, but the writing is Hebrew. This was done mainly for the benefit of those who knew the Arabic language but not the script. The majority of these transcriptions are scientific or philosophical texts. Transcriptions are of value to scholars for two reasons. Some entire texts, or more complete or accurate versions of texts, are preserved only (...)
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  42. John L. Bradshaw (2003). Gesture in Language Evolution: Could I but Raise My Hand to It! Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):213-214.score: 21.0
    An intervening gestural stage in language evolution, though seductive, is ultimately redundant, and is not necessarily supported by modern human or chimp behaviour. The findings and arguments offered from mirror neurones, anatomy, and lateralization are capable of other interpretations, and the manipulative dextrality of chimps is under-recognized. While language certainly possesses certain unique properties, its roots are ancient.
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  43. Ian Pratt-Hartmann (2004). Fragments of Language. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 13 (2):207-223.score: 21.0
    By a fragment of a natural language we mean a subset of thatlanguage equipped with semantics which translate its sentences intosome formal system such as first-order logic. The familiar conceptsof satisfiability and entailment can be defined for anysuch fragment in a natural way. The question therefore arises, for anygiven fragment of a natural language, as to the computational complexityof determining satisfiability and entailment within that fragment. Wepresent a series of fragments of English for which the satisfiabilityproblem is polynomial, (...)
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  44. Miklós Erdélyi-Szabó, László Kálmán & Agi Kurucz (2008). Towards a Natural Language Semantics Without Functors and Operands. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (1):1-17.score: 21.0
    The paper sets out to offer an alternative to the function/argument approach to the most essential aspects of natural language meanings. That is, we question the assumption that semantic completeness (of, e.g., propositions) or incompleteness (of, e.g., predicates) exactly replicate the corresponding grammatical concepts (of, e.g., sentences and verbs, respectively). We argue that even if one gives up this assumption, it is still possible to keep the compositionality of the semantic interpretation of simple predicate/argument structures. In our opinion, compositionality (...)
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  45. Laura Lakusta & Barbara Landau (2012). Language and Memory for Motion Events: Origins of the Asymmetry Between Source and Goal Paths. Cognitive Science 36 (3):517-544.score: 21.0
    When people describe motion events, their path expressions are biased toward inclusion of goal paths (e.g., into the house) and omission of source paths (e.g., out of the house). In this paper, we explored whether this asymmetry has its origins in people’s non-linguistic representations of events. In three experiments, 4-year-old children and adults described or remembered manner of motion events that represented animate/intentional and physical events. The results suggest that the linguistic asymmetry between goals and sources is not fully rooted (...)
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  46. Michael J. Pendlebury (2002). Thought and Language. South African Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):200-218.score: 21.0
    This article defends the view that nonlinguistic animals could be capable of thought (in the sense in which the mere possession of beliefs and desires is sufficient for thought). It is easy to identify flaws in Davidson's arguments for the thesis that thought depends upon language if one is open to the idea that some nonlinguistic animals have beliefs. It is, however, necessary to do more than this if one wishes to engage with the deeper challenge underlying Davidson's reasoning, (...)
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  47. Raymond L. Weiss (1971). Language and Ethics: Reflections on Maimonides' "Ethics". Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (4):425-433.score: 21.0
    The author considers maimonides' ethics in the context of the following problem: how can concepts be transmitted from one language to a radically different language? he examines how maimonides conveyed as well as transformed key greek moral concepts within rabbinic hebrew, Which has no words to translate literally such terms as 'virtue,' 'passion,' 'happiness,' or even 'ethics.' the one word found to be indispensable is that for 'ethics' in the original greek sense, I.E., 'character traits.' the author (...)
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  48. Johan van Benthem (forthcoming). Natural Language and Logic of Agency. Journal of Logic, Language and Information:1-16.score: 21.0
    This light piece reflects on analogies between two often disjoint streams of research: the logical semantics and pragmatics of natural language and dynamic logics of general information-driven agency. The two areas show significant overlap in themes and tools, and yet, the focus seems subtly different in each, defying a simple comparison. We discuss some unusual questions that emerge when the two are put side by side, without any pretense at covering the whole literature or at reaching definitive conclusions.
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  49. Walter Horn (2013). The Roots of Representationism: An Introduction to Everett Hall. LAP Lambert.score: 21.0
    American philosopher Everett W. Hall (1901-1960) was among the first epistemologists writing in English to have promoted “representationism,” a currently popular explanation of cognition. According to this school, there are no private sense-data or qualia, because the ascription (representation) of public properties that are exemplified in the world of common sense is believed to be sufficient to explain mental content. In this timely volume, Walter Horn, perhaps the foremost living expert on Hall’s philosophy, not only provides copious excerpts from Hall’s (...)
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  50. Jon Williamson (2003). Bayesianism and Language Change. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 12 (1):53-97.score: 21.0
    Bayesian probability is normally defined over a fixed language or eventspace. But in practice language is susceptible to change, and thequestion naturally arises as to how Bayesian degrees of belief shouldchange as language changes. I argue here that this question poses aserious challenge to Bayesianism. The Bayesian may be able to meet thischallenge however, and I outline a practical method for changing degreesof belief over changes in finite propositional languages.
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